Topic 7: Women and Depression {by 11/8}

Our first presentation – Depression – will be this coming week (11/8).  There is also one assigned reading that is due – “The ‘Self-in-Relation’: Implications for Depression in Women.”  Address the following  discussion point:  (1) Simply identify at least two significant messages (i.e., what resonated with you) that you got out of this reading with regard to depression and women.  Your original post should be posted by 11/8.  Have your two replies no later than 11/10.  *Please remember to click the “reply” button when posting a reply.  This makes it easier for the reader to follow the blog postings.

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39 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Anna Kenny
    Nov 06, 2012 @ 19:32:47

    This reading on the implications for depression in women was very sad. I have always thought of depression as more of a biological problem or something that stemmed from traumatic events. The “vulnerability to loss” section was one aspect that really resonated with me. I know many females who are considered “needy” or “dependent” because of the way they try to maintain relationships, especially with men. This insinuates that a women’s self worth is bound by her ability to maintain relational ties. This article is saying that women fear that following what they truly want to do or say may break this relational ties. This conflicting thoughts lead to low self-esteem and low self-worth. An example of this is a woman feeling as if she is to blame for a failed relationship. The example in the reading about the woman who did not want to disappoint her boss really stood out to me. She knew that she should be out pursuing her other talents and interests, but her job did not allow her the time or energy. It was not a well paying job and she did not enjoy it but she felt it would reflect her own weakness as an individual if she were to let her boss down. I keep bringing up our culture, and representations in the media but it seems to be a huge underlying factor in depression in women. Even in children’s fairy tales women are portrayed as being of value only if they are physically attractive and have found love. When this cannot be attained in reality it is easy to understand why so many women feel as if they are weak and not of great value.

    Reply

    • Kathy Wilbur
      Nov 07, 2012 @ 21:34:50

      I agree completely Anna. I, too, mostly have thought of depression as a biological problem and this view was a much sadder approach to the topic, though I understand why it should also be examined this way. I thought it was interesting that you mentioned fairy tale characters at the end of your post; I think that women in fairy tales and Disney movies are portrayed that way largely, though it is changing little by little. But as someone who grew up on Disney movies with characters like that, I think I disagree with the many people out there who blame these types of representations for women’s problems as they never affected me at all.

      Reply

    • Morgan Long
      Nov 08, 2012 @ 14:30:10

      I agree with all of the points you have made. I also like how you mentioned the media. It is understandable that so many women feel depressed and hopeless when the media portrays them as something that is nearly impossible to live up to. The article talked a lot about how depressed women think that negative things that happen are a reflection of themselves. They also feel guilty if they are not pleasing everyone else around them. This results in women striving to be someone that they’re not and attempting to please everyone besides themselves.

      Reply

      • Gianna Paolini
        Nov 12, 2012 @ 16:13:15

        I also liked how you mentioned the media. I feel that there is a huge pressure on women which helps with their depression because of the stress that they are under to live up to the ideals of a perfect women.

        Reply

  2. Eddaliz Correa
    Nov 07, 2012 @ 12:11:48

    This article gives its readers a very different way of looking at depression. Right away we are given a definition of depression which is different than what we normal think of it as. We tend to see it as someone who is always sad and does not see joy in every day tasks and life itself. Yet we read in this article how it also has to do with people wanting to please others and blame themselves for things that happen. I found it interesting to see how the author gave us another example of the description of depression using “he” instead of man or woman. Later in the article the author replaces the word “he” with she and we see that the description fits with both males and females but the way we visualize their depression may be different. Twice as many women undergo depressive episodes than men which is a large difference. It seems that men tend to express their frustrations and problems outward by going out with friends while women tend to internalize them and wonder what they did wrong instead of questioning what others did wrong. The author believes that women struggle because they have an exaggeration of the normative state of being a female in Western society. This can be how women are affected negatively by the media and their expectations are far different than the norm. The biggest key element of depression many of us see that plays a factor is the experience of loss. When anyone becomes attached to a certain person and they leave or pass away it has a big affect in their lives. Some people are able to over come it with time while others blame themselves for making them go, not being there before the death, or do not know how to function again without that person so they go into a deep depression. It is something many people struggle with and it is scary to know that many people hide their depression and struggle worse than people who express it.

    Reply

    • Chris Bozarjian
      Nov 08, 2012 @ 15:11:13

      I agree with everything you pointed out from the reading and how its important to understanding depression. Depression is just a chemical imbalance in the brain but is caused by women trying to please other or feel like there aren’t good enough. I find that really sad and it’s unfortuante that many women go throuhg depression because of that. All these examples tie into having a low self of steem which is signaled throughout the article.

      Reply

    • Avnee Patel
      Nov 08, 2012 @ 18:57:53

      I agree with you and think that men express their anger and frustrations openly with friends, while women tend to internalize their anger. I feel women question themselves more than men in certain situations. When there is a failed relationship, the woman blames herself for the reason the relationship failed while men would not think it was their fault. I also think that women are not supposed to show their frustration and anger as much as men do.

      Reply

    • Morgan McCallum
      Nov 10, 2012 @ 18:39:56

      Hey, Eddaliz, I really like what you have to say! I think it’s interesting how both men and women can have similar characteristics correlating to depression but how they respond to it is very different. I wonder if there wasn’t a social stigma attached to men having to be tough, if we’d see more men being emotional, crying, and talking through their depression with friends. I think that the part about losing someone you explained well, and I think that both females and males are similar when it comes to losing someone, more so than they are different.

      Reply

      • Gianna Paolini
        Nov 12, 2012 @ 16:15:52

        I also like the correlation that you made between men and women. Even though I feel the article that we read favored women it is interesting to point out the differnces that en show depression from anger and things like that.

        Reply

  3. Avnee Patel
    Nov 07, 2012 @ 15:30:47

    The article gave an interesting incite on depression. I found it sad to see that some women with depression encounter. I found it interesting that the author listed four key elements of depression which include the experience of loss, the inhibition of anger and aggression, inhibition of action or assertiveness and low self-esteem which contributed to depression found in women. I didn’t know that women who are depressed are aware of and in touch with their feelings of anger. “The fears of consequence of this anger are severe because these women experience their anger not as a valid sign of strength but rather as a confirmation of their bad and worthless selves”. I found this sad because they try to keep their anger and frustration in but when they express anger, the women blame themselves. The article also talked about how women inhibit their own striving and actions so as to preserve relational ties emerges over again. The article showed an example of a woman who works and her boss urges the employees to devote much more time than necessary to their work. The woman is grieved by the fear of letting her boss down. It’s sad to see how depressed women are fearful of certain situations were non-depressed women would not find fearful.

    Reply

    • Alyssa DelMonaco
      Nov 07, 2012 @ 23:33:19

      I also found the anger part of this article interesting. While reading it, I kept thinking about how men would act in this situation, and I feel like it would be completely different for most men. They would most likely let their anger out on other things, rather than blame and take it out on themselves like women do.

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    • Morgan Long
      Nov 08, 2012 @ 14:35:29

      I also find the inhibition of anger very troubling. Repressed anger can be an issue all on its own nevermind having it be only a portion of a mood disorder. It really is not healthy to internalize all of your feelings. I think that is why depression has so many symptoms that effect people physically. There comes a point where the stresses of life and not self advocating becomes exhausting. Being emotionally and physically exhasted takes a toll on every aspect of a person’s life.

      Reply

    • Anna Kenny
      Nov 08, 2012 @ 15:28:54

      Avnee, I thought your groups presentation today was a good example of the effects stated in this article. Sylvia Plath has a multitude of factors in her life that would easily predispose her to depression. Her father’s parenting style and life choices set her up for an unhappy life, especially since the loss of her father had left her with no solid parental figure. Also, the fact that her work was never published or acknowledged damaged her self esteem.

      Reply

  4. Alyssa DelMonaco
    Nov 07, 2012 @ 20:42:28

    One thing that I found interesting within the article was how the author names four key elements of depression. They were the experience of loss, the inhibition of anger and aggression, the inhibition of action or assertiveness, and low self-esteem. Another thing I found interesting was how the author changed the description of depression by saying “she” rather than “he” in the definition. It points out the fact that not only could this be a description of depression, but also a description of one aspect of the experience of being a woman in today’s society. The definition consisted of needing to please others and act in accordance to their expectations, which causes someone to lose touch with themselves. It results in doing things only for others and not for you, which has further consequences of feelings of unhappiness, futility, and unfulfillment. The authors made the point that this is not only a description of depression, but a description of women as well. I also found it interesting how the author described the vulnerability to loss. She said it is more than “object loss;” it is “the loss of confirmation of their core self-structure as one that can facilitate reciprocity and affective connection in relationships.” I thought this was an interesting way to view depression and the vulnerability to loss.

    Reply

    • Kathy Wilbur
      Nov 07, 2012 @ 21:30:15

      Alyssa, I agree that the author’s take on the vulnerability to loss was especially interesting. It seemed to me that he was saying that the effect of loss is devastating not for the loss itself but for what the loss does to one’s self image and worth, and I thought that was an extremely unique perspective that definitely had some truth to it.

      Reply

    • Eddaliz Correa
      Nov 09, 2012 @ 19:39:45

      I agree that women tend to try to please others and if they do something wrong they take it out on themselves. It is much easier for women to be controlled than for men. Especially if it an abusive boyfriend or spouse etc., they try so hard to be perfect and conform. They depend on that person to tell them what to do and look for their judgement. This causes many women depression and even after they leave that partner it seems that they keep going in that cycle of obeying their spouse too much and keep looking at themselves at being the reason why they are unhappy.

      Reply

  5. Kathy Wilbur
    Nov 07, 2012 @ 21:14:03

    Right away, I was struck by this paper’s different approach to analyzing depression. “Indeed, the frequency of depression in women suggests that depression may not be an “illness” superimposed on an alien or indifferent personality structure, but rather may be a distortion- an exaggeration of the normative state of being female in Western society.” This sentence left a bad taste in my mouth, as I personally believe depression to be a mostly biological disease, but the rest of the reading did admittedly have some interesting insights into the type of person who usually falls victim to depression. In the “Inhibition of Action and Assertion” section, I realized I know many women who do blame themselves for relational failures, often asserting that they could have “been better.” I am not sure why men do not have this tendency as much, but perhaps there is a correlation between behaviors like this and depression, as men don’t have depression as much, either. If we could teach women early on and more vehemently that relationships rarely fail due to THEIR exclusive personal failure, maybe they could be more realistic in assessing such things and thus prevent themselves from falling into the traps that lead down a depressive road. The second significant message that I took from this reading was more general. It seemed to me that most of this reading focused on the emotionality of women and how that led them to acquire depression. I thought the tone of the whole thing may be a little unfairly slanted, not only in virtually ignoring the biological causes as I mentioned earlier, but in failing to equally emphasize the people who cause such emotionality in women- the men who abuse them, the parents who neglect them, the society that puts endless pressure on them, etc. If these things could be explored so in depth, maybe they would stop and there would be less to write about regarding women’s emotions and low self-esteem.

    Reply

    • Morgan
      Nov 09, 2012 @ 13:22:40

      Hey, Kathy, I really like what you had to say! It think it’s crucial to think about depression in terms of location, and culture, so I liked that you mentioned our Western culture. We have talked recently about how eating disorders aren’t as prevelant in the east, and it’s really a side effect of our culture, etc. I definitely think we need to help girls realize that relationships involve two people; both of whom are responsible for aspects of the relationship. I also know friends who tend to internalize blame for bad things that happen in a relationship, or a failed relationship. It’s really sad to watch. There are some females who are chronically depressed and have a fight/breakup with their significant other (in this case-male) and feel like it was their fault, they could have done something differently, etc., and there are also girls who don’t identify with depression, who experience relationship trouble and have a depressive episode; it is a lot for each individual to handle, but that’s a really heavy load for the already depressed female. Either way, fair that they engage in self-blame, or “what-if?” I wonder what this is like with lesbian couples; if two people are internalizing blame and feeling they alone have made things bad. Interesting stuff.

      Reply

    • Eddaliz Correa
      Nov 09, 2012 @ 18:28:39

      I agree that it seems like it is easier for women to fall into depression because of the effects of biology, society and because they tend to blame themselves a lot more than men. Instead of looking at other reasons as to why they failed they think of only reasons to blame themselves even if it was obviously not their fault such as a family death. I also agree that the article focused mainly on the emotional aspects of it and did not go into reasons why they are lead into that path.

      Reply

  6. Nicole Boris
    Nov 07, 2012 @ 21:33:32

    One significant message that really stuck with me after the reading is the section about the key elements of depression. The section on the experience of loss really helped me realize how depression in women can begin. I never really thought of the loss of a sifnigicant other or family member could lead to depression. I have been fortuante enough to never lose someone so close to me so i cannot relate personally to any of this. When I think of depression I think of someone just not being happy with their lives for whatever reason, i never associated death to be involved.
    This other significant message that really stuck with me after the reading was the section on inhibition of action and assertion. This states that when women experience failure or frustration with their attempts to connect with others they take responsibility for the failure. When more failures happen the woman will continue to beat herself up over the situation. These actions can lead to the woman developing depression. I personally have never experienced this and after reading this found it strange that woman think in this way. Just because a relationship doesn’t work does not mean that it is all their fault and that they shoudl beat themselves up so much that they go into depression.

    Reply

    • Alyssa DelMonaco
      Nov 07, 2012 @ 23:38:37

      When I read the part about inhibition of action and assertion, I was not really surprised. I feel like it is common for a lot of women to blame themselves for failing to connect with others. I feel like women take things more personally than men do, and therefore put more pressure and blame on themselves. I feel like I have seen similiar situations with women in my life.

      Reply

      • Meghan Surette
        Nov 08, 2012 @ 10:39:01

        I don’t think it’s fair to say that women “take things more personally” than men do as if women are more sensitive and men are simply cold. I think if we’re talking stereotpes then yes, women are stereotyped as much more sensitve and emotional than men are. But we also talked a little bit in class about how women are just more open with their feelings than men are when we talked about how mouch more acceptable it is for women to cry (show their sensitivity) than men. This would make them seem more sensitive or emotional but not necessarily actually be the gender with more sensitive or emotional feelings. Everyone has different outlets of expression.

        Reply

      • Mallory Ozycz
        Nov 10, 2012 @ 22:29:39

        Alyssa, I agree I feel women are a lot harder on themselves then men are and take failure and relationship going wrong more personally. Its sad that they always feel the need to please others. I also feel when men are faced with failure they tend to blame others rather than taking responsibility or full responsibility like women do.

        Reply

    • Anna Kenny
      Nov 08, 2012 @ 15:31:52

      The fact that women feel as if they are at fault for a failed relationship stood out to me to. This was not something I had ever considered but after reading it, the notion makes perfect sense. I feel as if this is something all women experience, but they usually do not consciously understand that it is occurring. Looking back, I think I have experienced this before. When a friendship or relationship doesn’t work out, I usually blame myself, thinking it was something I had done. I feel that this is quite common and very sad.

      Reply

    • Avnee Patel
      Nov 08, 2012 @ 20:08:26

      Depression can be caused by stressful events in life that occur such as, death or divorce. I feel had losing a loved one who has a major impact on your life can cause depression. The presentation today had a good example on how losing a loved one can lead to depression. A part of Sylvia Plath’s depression had to do with losing her father whom she was very close to. She shared a bond with him and when he died, she felt alone. I think losing a loved one brings sadness and emptiness to the person.

      Reply

  7. Meghan Surette
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 11:03:00

    From the assigned atricle, there were a lot of really interesting points. I think the author did a good job in keeping my attention throughout as the reader.
    It was incredibly interesting to read about the various underlying causes and effects of women who suffer from depression. The experience of a loss section was really interesting in that it talked about poor coping skills and reliance on others, but it addressed breakups and romantic relationship problems before it talked about the physical loss of a death. Although a minor detail and certainly the order of the discussion is not the point of the article but I still found this incredibly interesting. I would think that the first thing to say or mention in this section about loss would be the most detrimental of a loss to a depressant so it seemed, to me, to make much more sense to talk about the effects of death first. When the authors started talking about relationship breakups as losses I wrongly assumed death was somehow mentioned in another section of the article.
    Further along in that same section, the authors talked about the effect the parental relationship has on the mental and emotional health of the depressant. After reading this, however, I realized that it doesn’t really matter which aspect of a loss the author mentions first because dependant on the relationship with the family as well as personality of the depressant, the loss of a partner could very well be more harmful to their psychological well-being than the loss of a grandparent or other relative.

    Reply

  8. Nicole Gaviola
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 11:37:35

    “The Self in-Relation” article offers a different and relatively sad view on women’s depression. Depression is often though of as a biological phenomenon but perhaps women experience depression for different reasons. What resonated with me in this article was women’s “vulnerability to loss.” Some of the characteristics described are indicative of certain behaviors I have seen in some of my friends and family. Women who are depressed often define themselves in terms of the relationship they are in. They tend to devalue the importance of their own endeavors. Depressed women are often in a constant state of felt loss due to the loss of their self. Another thing that resonated with me in this article was depressed women will often think if they were “better” they would not have such problems in their lives such as failed relationships. They base their self-worth on the relationships they are able to maintain and if they do not succeed, there is a continuous cycle of self-blame. I think it’s really sad that depressed women experience this pain and perhaps as a society, should understand what has lead women to define themselves and their self-worth in terms of others.

    Reply

    • Gina Holick
      Nov 12, 2012 @ 18:58:13

      I do agree about the depression in terms of loss because that happens quite often, like you had stated. It is very sad that people are so immensed in their depression that they can’t seem to find their way out of it. That is why I had stated in my response that these people need to seek some sort of therapy immediately.

      Reply

  9. Gina Holick
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 12:01:08

    I felt that the very beginning of the article was important with the message it gave. The first quote talked about the boy who experiences depression and how he feels that he is blamed for his feelings of unhappiness. The quote makes you think a lot. The boy feels like he has to always please everyone around him which therefore makes him feel inferior. He essentially feels out of touch with reality. The beginning of the article states to us that more women than men have this disoder. I had known that before.

    On page one there is a quote that I should point out. It refers to a key point in the article It reads, “Salzman (1975), for example, suggests that “the underlying personality in which a depressive episode occurs may be the key issue” (The Self-in-Relation”: Implications for Depression in Women). What I got out of his theory would be saying that there are some underlying personality factors that need to be delved into. I wonder if you could think of it as an unconscious factor that people need to seek out therapy in order to understand. Chodoff (1994) says that it could actually be predisposing personality factors. What we need to do is find ways to test different hypotheses.

    The article also mentions some key elements of depression. One of them being The experience of loss. It mentions Freud’s pyschoanlysis in which most feminists do not like because it is very bias against women. It more so today refers to the ego psychology. I felt that this was an interesting connection with depression because it mentions how emotional loss can be linked to depression. Aaron Beck and Seligman proposed this theory in 1975. I feel as if I agree with this proposed theory because when someone is feeling anguished with feelings of unhappiness everyday, it can most definitely be linked to another source such as losing a loved one. I also feel that other factors could cause depression as well, not just one single source. Though, feelings of unhappiness due to the loss of someone can be overwhelming and take over your mind. This is when that person should seek out help. The feelings could then get worse and may lead to the person feeling suicidal. That would be an extreme case I am sure, but should be mentioned. This theory is a behavioral theory because it shows how our thoughts and behaviors can be linked to a certain source.

    Reply

  10. Nichole Ronan
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 12:02:39

    Right as I began reading the article, the definition of the depression stood out to me. I always thought depression was simply just constantly feeling sad and down. I never knew how complex it actually was, for example the definition states that people who are depress have the necessity to please others. I also thought depression was more of a biological disease so the section on the four key elements of depression really interested me. The key elements are experience of loss, the inhibition of anger and aggression, the inhibition of action or assertiveness, and low self-esteem. It’s interesting to see where depression can actually stem from. In the inhibition of action or assertiveness section I realized in my life I’ve seen a lot of women blame themselves for their relationship failures and say if they were better it would’ve worked out, when in reality most of the times this is not the case. Overall I think the reading was really sad seeing as I was under the impression that depression was more of a biological thing, rather than it being something a woman can fall victim to.

    Reply

    • Mallory Ozycz
      Nov 10, 2012 @ 22:09:07

      Nichole, I agree with your statement that a lot of girls feel as though they are to blame for every failed relationship in their life. Its sad to see that most of the time it is not the girls fault and they feel the need to ask themselves if they did something different would the relationship work out.

      Reply

  11. Morgan Long
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 12:25:11

    This article made me look at depression in a totally different way. Before reading this, I understood depression to be a chemical inbalance in the brain. However, there are a lot of other factors that contribute to it. I found it interesting that the key elements of depression all lead back to low self-esteem. Feelings of anger and agression are internalized and in turn are an attack on the self. The inability to take action and decreased motivation relects ones behavior. Earlier in the year we discussed how women generally have a lower self-esteem than men. This could be a factor as to why depression is mostly found in women.
    In researching depression on my own, I have found information saying that loosing someone close to you is high on the list of the most traumatic events that can happen in life. It was not surprising to me to read that the vulnerability to loss is one of the key elements of depression. The article also stresses the importance of connections in life. People that have strong connections with their family and friends do not realize how important it really is. Depressed women feel a strong need to have those connections in life. If they do not have those connections they feel as though it is a reflection on themselves. However, there could be other factors to failed relationships. That is something that is not easy for a depressed women to accept. Everything is a reflection on them.

    Reply

    • Chris Bozarjian
      Nov 08, 2012 @ 15:07:22

      This article also made me look at depression in a different way. A key point that really stuck out to me and you pointed it out is how women hold in their anger and express it through sadness and basicaly hold in their anger and eventually blame themselves. I found that to be an interesting factor in depression.

      Reply

  12. Emily Stewart
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 12:44:27

    This short article about depressed women versus depressed men taught me a lot of interesting things that I had never known before. First off, I believe that depression amongst women is much different than depression amongst a male. As stated in the article, women are often more needy, insecure, and have low self-esteem, thus they are more prone to suffer from depression. Feelings of helplessness and worthlessness occur more with insecure and depressed women. I believe that this is main reason why they experience “feelings of grave injury.” This is sad, yet interesting to me because there are so many women who have no self-esteem but who’s to say they are depressed? Men can also have low self-esteem, however, females show it more. Eventually, the result of low self-esteem amongst women can cause them to not recognize their own impulses. Secondly, self-in-relation theory is something I have never heard of before. This theory states that women develop depression when they experience a relational loss, such as a breakup. However, females feel a sense of failure in themselves which makes them more depressed, even if they did not do anything wrong. Since woman become very dependent on one person, losing that person makes us ask ourselves “what did I do wrong?” As a result, we blame ourselves and feel a state of “felt loss.” What I did not know however, we also feel more of a “loss of confirmation of core self-structure.” I now can understand that depression is not only extreme sadness on the outside, but it is also internally affects a women to a greater extent than a male.

    Reply

  13. Morgan McCallum
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 12:46:23

    “What is striking about these examples is that these women not only feel diminished in self-esteem by relatively minor actions, but come in time not to trust, or even be able to recognize, their own impulses, which then feeds into the inhibition of action discussed above, (Kaplan, 60.” I liked this quote by Kaplan because it made me think about something I learned lately; that women tend to be depressed not because of major events, but because of consistent events, that add up. I think that when women have a low self-esteem and internalize blame, they really do get worked up over relatively minor things, sometimes, which are caused by external means, and are out of their control.
    “While both of these personalities are oriented to a search for love, the paths that they take are diametrically opposed. For the first [female], the search occurs within a relation process with the feelings and self of the person altered and shaped so as to preserve connectedness for which the person holds herself responsible. For the second, the search occurs via the path of self-aggrandizement, which secondarily may promote connection with others. Others should love the person, for what he has done for himself, which his own actions reflect no contribution to building connection, nor does his self-esteem lie in his capacities to forge this connection, (Kaplan 8).” I found this whole passage crucial, and interesting, in regards to how females and males may attempt to gain a connection. Female’s can be seen as “people pleasers” in this text, whom seeks validation in what she does for others, rather than the male in this passage, who attempts to be beloved for what he has done for himself; his independence, his strengths, his self-worth.

    Reply

  14. Chris Bozarjian
    Nov 08, 2012 @ 15:05:18

    The two signifcant messages I got from this article are pretty similar. What I understood from this article was that obviously depression is found mostly in women. However it seemed like the article got into detail on how its situational and depends on the person and there characteristics and also the situation they are in. The main thing I understood was that it usually depends on the persons characteristics. If they have low self esteem for example they are probably going to be depressed at one point or are going through depression.
    Someones personality traits and the way they handle things play a huge role in depression. Maybe the individual could be timid, afraid, self concious, all these factors could lead to depression. The reason I believe women are mainly linked with depression is because most women are steretyped to have these characteristics. Overall what I got from this article is there are genetic, biological, and environmental factors that could all lead to depression. Also learned that there isn’t much of a difference between depression in men and women, it just hints towards women more.

    Reply

  15. Gianna Paolini
    Nov 09, 2012 @ 00:06:47

    I found this article very interesting. I liked how it varied between men and women. It obviously favored women however it was interesting to see what they said about the traits of each person. It was also interesting to see how they talked about the coping methods of a depressed person. It is natural to lean on somone or go to a person for help. I feel that a women’s emotions has a lot to do with if a women becomes depressed.

    Reply

    • Meghan Surette
      Nov 09, 2012 @ 17:46:03

      I agree Gianna, I liked that this article gave two contrasting point of views in regards to men and women and their depression tendencies. Throughout this course, the main focus has always been solely on women so it was interesting to see the contrast and the overlapping aspects this article discussed. I also agree with you Gianna, when you say that “it is natural to lean on someone” and I feel like that applies to both men and women but the differences in coping when that person leaves is so interesting as well.

      Reply

  16. Mallory Ozycz
    Nov 09, 2012 @ 22:44:21

    I found it interesting that the author broke depression down into four different key elements. The first one was experience of loss which could either do with loss of someone through death or through the experience of an emotional connection.The second element was the inhibition of anger and aggression, when relational losses cause a person to turn their anger towards a failed relationship back on themselves. I found this element to be interesting when it came to concentrating on women. Women tend to depend on relationships and blame themselves when things go wrong in that relationship, depressed women define themselves through the relationship or man they are with and when he is not around anymore it is more than an “object loss”, but “the loss of confirmation of their own self-structure”. The next element, Inhibition of action of assertiveness, is explained as a “powerless ego state” this is found a lot in women when experiencing failure. The depressed women assumes if they were better they would not have such problems, leaving them with no hopes for the future and a fear to try again. I find this to be very upsetting knowing that a women could be so depressed that she doesn’t even try to have relationships anymore with the fear that she wont be good enough. The last element was low self-esteem which is the end effect to the other three conditions. Even though low self esteem is a big component in men authors say it more often found in women.

    Reply

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Adam M. Volungis, PhD, LMHC

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