Topic 7: Core Beliefs {by 10/22}

[Automatic Thoughts] – After our last class (10/8) you were asked to complete your own Negative Automatic Thought Record. (1) Did the NATR help you “see” the relationship between event, negative automatic thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and outcomes?  Explain.  (2) What did you find the most helpful in completing the AFTER portion of the NATR?  For example, was a particular Socratic technique or developing an alternative thought helpful?

 

[Core Beliefs] – Watch MDD-16: Core Beliefs – Identifying 2 – Core Belief Flowchart-Part A.  Answer the following: (1) In what way was the CBF-A effective in understanding how the clients’ core belief developed? (2) What additional historical information could have been obtained to understand the development of the client’s core belief?

 

Your original post should be posted by the beginning of class 10/22.  Have your two replies posted no later than 10/24.  *Please remember to click the “reply” button when posting a reply.  This makes it easier for the reader to follow the blog postings.

31 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Francesca DePergola
    Oct 14, 2020 @ 13:15:52

    Automatic Thoughts
    (1) The NATR did help me “see” the relationship between events, negative automatic thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and outcomes. It seems like it all had this butterfly effect on one another and depending on what I did or how I reacted, I could see a difference. I think this can be very beneficial for all clients to utilize as it helps understand and see the connection between events, negative automatic thoughts, and so on. Learning a little about my experience I know that in the future I react better using certain techniques to shift these negative automatic thoughts to more adaptive ones.
    (2) What did you find the most helpful in completing the AFTER portion of the NATR? For example, was a particular Socratic technique or developing an alternative thought helpful?
    I found it most helpful to fill in the alternative thoughts section in the AFTER portion of the NATR. I thought it was helpful for me to think of different ways I could think about the situation instead of my first initial thought. It also was very helpful in choosing a specific Socratic technique like examining the evidence since that could be very helpful in my situation. There was little validity to my negative automatic thought which, while reminding myself of that in the future among using other techniques, will better help me think less negatively.

    Core Beliefs
    (1) The core belief flowchart A is effective in understanding how the clients’ core belief developed because it is concerned with historical events and present patterns. This flowchart also provided a list of domains to assess the core beliefs such as category and lens, significant individuals, significant life events, and others. Overall, assessing these domains while also tracing negative automatic thoughts helps the client gain awareness of some of their core beliefs. It does take practice, but like anything, it can become more natural to recognize them, write them down, and identify the domains.
    (2) Maybe some additional historical information that could have been obtained to understand the development of the client’s core belief could include religious background, past significant individuals, and maybe some parts of family ideals, values, and thoughts. Although some domains may include parts of the family, it would be interesting to see how they think about things and how that affects the client. I mention past significant relationships because the domain of “significant relationships,” may convey to the client only current ones, but maybe the client had a girlfriend and that girlfriend played a big role in how he views himself. I also mentioned a religious background because religious ideals may play a big role in how they view the world, others, and themselves.

    Reply

    • Allie Supernor
      Oct 18, 2020 @ 09:42:00

      Francesca, I appreciated that you valued the after section of the NATR the most! In my post I discussed the significance of the before section. For example, with my negative automatic thought, I experienced flushed cheeks, quicken heart rate, itchy skin and sweaty palms. Although it makes sense that these bodily sensations followed an anxious thought, I was never this aware of my physiological reaction to anxiety before this exercise. However, in your discussion you helped me see the significance of looking for alternative thoughts.

      Reply

    • Madi
      Oct 18, 2020 @ 10:02:41

      Hi Francesca,
      I had a similar experience with the NATR and agree with you completely about the benefit of the “after” section. I also thought the flowchart was effective and definitely helped Mark. I would push you to think further about the other historical information and what the client and therapist would gain from diving deeper about these topics.

      Reply

    • Haley Scola
      Oct 21, 2020 @ 14:08:49

      Hi Francesca,

      I also found that the NATR was helpful and provides a lot of insight for clients and therapists. I also used examine the evidence as my Socratic technique and I after I did that I realized my thoughts were pretty catastrophic and I jumped to conclusions due to ambiguity. I think completing this honestly will help in the future because seeing how the outcome could have been different once I did the AFTER I think ill be more likely to remember to utilize this skill. Additionally, I like how you mentioned to focus on religion because that did not cross my mind immediately but I think has potential for a lot of insight.

      Reply

    • Christopher LePage
      Oct 22, 2020 @ 19:15:51

      Hi Francesca,
      I really liked your explanation about why alternative thoughts was so helpful to you. I think that it is really important to understand that with this technique you do not have to keep ruminating about your initial thoughts, as this may not be helpful to the individual. For clients it may benefit them more to think about other thoughts or courses of action they may have regarding a particular situation. This may be helpful because the next time the situation occurs, they may handle it with one of these alternative choices that they have already assessed for themselves.

      Reply

  2. Allie Supernor
    Oct 18, 2020 @ 09:39:37

    Part One (NATR)
    (1). When completing my own negative automatic thought record, I genuinely saw the relationship between event, negative automatic thoughts, emotions/behaviors and outcomes. For me, this relationship was most illustrated in the before section. For example, with my negative automatic thought, I experienced flushed cheeks, quicken heart rate, itchy skin and sweaty palms. Although it makes sense that these bodily sensations followed an anxious thought, I was never this aware of my physiological reaction to anxiety before this exercise. The negative automatic thought record forced me to be more aware of both my physiological reaction and emotional response the original belief. Additionally, I also really enjoyed the intensity and believability ratings. This allowed me to put focus on modifying specific parts of the negative automatic thought. (2). The Socratic technique that I used was ‘examine the evidence.’ This allowed me to really determine the validity of each thought. I enjoyed using this technique and can see that this technique helps identify a secondary modification approach. I could see using this Socratic technique helps identify which thoughts are valid and invalid, and what should be used next for the invalid thoughts. A second Socratic technique I found to be particularly helpful for my unique negative automatic thought was the ‘separate self from negative automatic thought.’ It can be so hard to be objective when it happens to ourselves. Therefore, posing the scenario with a different individual may be helpful. What would you say if this happened to a co-worker? This allowed me to recognize an alternative interpretation of the experience that was more adaptive and relevant, that I wouldn’t have been able to see.
    Part Two (CBF-A)
    (1). There are other exercises that do not provide enough clarity in identifying specific core believes. For example, the negative automatic thought record can provide some insight to possible patterns that could be linked to specific core beliefs. However, it is not as clear. A great visual that can help fill in the gaps that previous exercise leave is the core belief flowchart. To complete this flowchart obtaining some historical individuals, events and contextual factors may provide some insight to the development of core beliefs. The core belief flowchart can help explain this concept because it allows you to focus on a client-specific personal example and how it leads to the development of a view on the self, world and others. The core belief flowchart’s focus is on modifying the negative core belief after relevant historical information ahs been gathered and can apply related thinking patterns. For example, Mark talks about his lack of friends (‘not popular’) and his parents parenting style (‘being too hard on him’) lead to us ‘unlikeable’ and ‘worthlessness’ core belief as an adult. (2). I think some other historical information that would be helpful would be contributing sociocultural factors. For example, it may be helpful to know and understand the religion a client was raised in. Similarly, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, socioeconomic status, or immigration status can be really telling on how an individual views the world.

    Reply

    • Madi
      Oct 18, 2020 @ 10:06:16

      Hi Allie,
      I found it interesting that you noticed body sensations, whereas for me that was not the prominent part of the “before” section. I really enjoyed your response to the NATR because you had a different experience than me which was interesting to read about. I also agree with you about the flow chart and how it helps explore the path of the core belief. I did not think about sociocultural factors when thinking about other historical information but I feel that would be important information to have.

      Reply

    • Francesca DePergola
      Oct 21, 2020 @ 16:37:03

      Hi Allie,
      I also chose to examine the evidence as the Socratic technique. I thought by deciding what I believed to be valid or invalid through past experiences and such led to immediate relief and I could tell it was pretty invalid. I am not saying it was completely invalid because there was some truth to my thinking and behavioral patterns, but I could see where it was getting a little extreme. I also agree with your statements about the other Socratic technique that you chose. It is definitely hard to be objective when it comes to yourself, so I can see the benefits that would have too.

      Reply

    • Eileen Kinnane
      Oct 21, 2020 @ 18:38:47

      Hi Allie, I also had a similar reaction to the before section. I have had this particular NAT for a while and always thought I knew that my following behavior was to practice a mindfulness exercise. However, it wasn’t until the NATR that I realized there were behaviors I participated in between the thought and the mindfulness exercise that were enforcing my belief in the NAT.

      Reply

    • Selene Anaya
      Oct 22, 2020 @ 15:29:40

      Hey Allie!
      I completely agree with you that this exercise really made me more aware of my physiological reaction and put meaning to it. Not only that, but I was able to give it more attention and figure out ways I could help the physiological reaction like deep breathing or something else that relaxed me. I didn’t choose the Socratic technique of separating self from negative automatic thought, but I can definitely see how seeing the situation from another perspective can be helpful when interpreting the situation a different way. I also like how you explained the core belief flowchart as an exercise to fill in the gaps. I have always known the importance of viewing situations holistically and I think there is some good information that can be obtained through the use of this exercise!

      Reply

  3. Madi
    Oct 18, 2020 @ 09:58:14

    1. Automatic thoughts
    a. The NATR allowed me to see clearly the relationship between event, negative automatic thought, emotions, behaviors and outcomes. While in my day to day living I see all five of these constantly, but it was very interesting to see it written down. Even though I knew about them and how they impact my daily life, it was interesting to see it written down.
    b. I believe that the therapeutic part of the NATR comes from the “After” sections. While it is good to do the “before” section and understand those five elements, I believe that it is the “after” section that is the main focus of the worksheet. For the “after” section looks to modify the thoughts and behaviors. By starting to think of other thoughts and behaviors one can then begin to make the necessary changes.
    2. Core beliefs
    a. The flow chart allows for the client to see how his core belief has developed. By developing a understanding of how the core belief has developed then the therapist and the client can see how best to modify the core belief. I found the flow chart to be very clear and methodical which I found helpful. The work sheet takes the difficult and complex of core beliefs and makes it digestible.
    b. Additional historical information that could have been obtained to understand the development of the client’s core beliefs would be a family background. Mark jumped to high school and college, there is a time gap there. The core beliefs could have originated in his childhood. Mark did not talk about his up brining or childhood experiences. I would also want to know more about his interpersonal relationships in childhood, high school, and college. I would want to know how his core beliefs have impacted his relationships in the past.

    Reply

    • Allie Supernor
      Oct 19, 2020 @ 14:07:09

      Hi Madi, I appreciate how you noted the time gap in Mark’s video, from high school to college. That is not something I picked up on but can understand the importance of holding that information when thinking about the development of core beliefs. So much learning and growing takes place in adolescence and later adulthood and I appreciate that you’d need more information during that time period.

      Reply

    • Haley Scola
      Oct 21, 2020 @ 14:13:39

      Hi Madi,

      I liked how you pointed out the visualization of the worksheet was very helpful because I thought the same thing. We can think about these things throughout the day but when it comes time to write them down it brings a new level of awareness. I also liked how you found the worksheet to be methodological and clear because I pointed that out in my blog as well. It was very concrete and helpful to both the client and therapist, I think. Lastly, I agree with your point that childhood experiences should have been focused on more as well because that leaves a huge gap of time when our perceptions and understanding of others and life start to come alive.

      Reply

    • Francesca DePergola
      Oct 21, 2020 @ 16:32:36

      Hi Madi.
      I felt similarly to you with the NATR before and after sections. I too thought that the after section was the most helpful since it focused on modifying the thoughts and behaviors. Just imagining the alternatives to what was originally thought or done was therapeutic in it of itself. I think you are right about additional information containing some family background. I think that would be interesting to know a little more about Mark’s situation.

      Reply

    • Alison Kahn
      Oct 21, 2020 @ 23:10:58

      Madi,

      I also highlighted how informative it was to actually write down and see on paper the impact of events on my thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. It really helped to better understand the “play-by-play” of external and internal processes in a more solidified way.

      Reply

  4. Haley Scola
    Oct 21, 2020 @ 14:01:26

    Automatic Thoughts:

    1. I think the NATR helped me notice a relationship between a negative event, my automatic thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and outcomes for the reason that because I knew I had to fill this out I was aware of my emotions and negative automatic thoughts more than usual. It helped me take a second to become aware of any physical sensations the distress caused me and how my reaction may not have been the best choice to make a better outcome. When I was in the moment my heart started racing, I became unable to focus on anything else other than my negative automatic thoughts and I was starting to ruminate. Doing the “after” and applying a Socratic technique allowed me to physically and emotionally calm down and notice how those negative automatic thoughts begin to spiral out of control without me even “noticing”. If I tried a Socratic technique before I reacted, the outcome would have most likely been a lot different and I wouldn’t have allowed a few hours of my day to be ruined by my own thoughts.

    2. The Socratic technique I used was “examine the evidence”. My distressing event was that my best friend didn’t answer my text of me asking her to hangout until the next day. I was able to examine the evidence that she has been my best friend for over 5 years, texts me all the time, and asks me to hangout frequently. I began to have automatic thoughts that she doesn’t like me anymore because we went from seeing each other every day in undergrad to seeing each other maybe once a month if were lucky since our schedules don’t match up anymore. My negative automatic thoughts seemed to spiral, and I ‘convinced’ myself that we must not even be friends anymore. My ‘before’ reaction was to text her a few more times which led to me sitting by my phone and withdrawing from my girlfriend who I was with at the time. When I examined the evidence, I was able to ‘fill in the gaps’ since she didn’t answer, with “she must be really busy today because we are as close as family”. After this, my heart rate went down, and I was able to be more present in the moment with my girlfriend and go back to spending quality time with her.

    Core Beliefs:

    1. I personally found the CBF-A to be very effective in understanding how the clients’ core belief developed through its concrete and easy to follow steps. Because it focuses on historical events and significant individuals, it allows for both the client and therapist to explore those past experiences, find the “root” of the problem (when the core belief originated from) and notice any present patterns. Once that has become aware, additional information such as coping skills that may add to the distress are evaluated. Additionally, the CBF-A doesn’t simply focus on getting rid of the distressing core belief but works to collaboratively modify it into one that is beneficial to the client in the future.

    2. Additional historical information that could have been obtained to understand the development of the clients core belied would be more information of significant individuals rather than just events. I think this because the negative experiences must happen multiple times for it to become a core belief and individuals usually who give one reason to feel, for example, worthless has most likely done this several times based on the relationship. Lastly, family history could have been examined more in depth and relationships between Mark and members of the family to dissect even further.

    Reply

    • Trey Powers
      Oct 24, 2020 @ 19:15:22

      Hi Haley!

      It sounds like the NATR helped you a good deal. Experiencing things like negative thoughts in the moment can be overwhelming for a lot of people. Having a resource like the NATR I think is a good way of encouraging people to not only notice their thoughts and feelings, but also begin to take a step back from the situation itself and examine things more objectively. Over time, hopefully people will be better equipped to engage in this process on their own so that they don’t experience such an intense reaction to certain situations.

      Reply

  5. Eileen Kinnane
    Oct 21, 2020 @ 19:01:59

    Automatic Thoughts
    (1)The NATR definitely helped me to “see” the relationship between event, negative automatic thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and outcomes. At first, it took me some time to realize what the event was. I spent a lot of time focusing on the thought itself, that when I was reflecting on the thought, I almost forgot what had triggered it. I also struggled with realizing the behaviors that followed the event, but spending time on the NATR and reflecting on exactly what happened afterwards really helped me to understand my response to the Negative Automatic thought. Now that I have recognized some things that I had not recognized initially, I am able to have a better understanding of the Negative Automatic thought the next time I think it.

    (2) I found it most helpful reflecting on the Socratic Techniques in the AFTER portion of the NATR. For me, reflecting on supporting and opposing evidence to my thought helped the most. When identifying a Negative Automatic Thought, it’s easy for me to say “that’s irrational” and tell myself that my thought it “wrong.” However, reflecting on what evidence there was to support my thought made me feel less “crazy” and actually helped me feel more confidence in my ability to alter and adapt my Negative Automatic Thought.
     
    Core Beliefs
    (1) The CBF-A is elective in understanding how the clients’ core belief developed because is offers a visual into the development of the core belief. Since it focuses on historical events and significant individuals, it opens up the opportunity for the client and therapist to dig down to the root of the presenting core belief. In Mark’s case, he discusses the trouble he had in high school dealing with feelings of being left out by his friends. This can correlate to current events that he is dealing with, which offers a trail leading up to his belief of unlikeability.

    (2) Some additional historical information to obtain that could be beneficial in understanding Mark’s Core Belief a little more could be in his religious practices. Religion can often hold high expectations for an individual and if Mark is someone who has “failed” to meet those expectations at times, it could be reinforcing his Core Beliefs. I know Mark touched upon his parents being “too hard on him,” but I would want to explore that a little more. I would want to know if Mark had siblings, and if his parents had similar expectations for them. If his parents appeared to “favor” his siblings over him, this is another aspect that could be reinforcing Mark’s Core Belief.

    Reply

    • Alison Kahn
      Oct 21, 2020 @ 23:04:35

      Eileen,

      I also was interested in delving deeper into the client’s relationship/historical experiences with his parents. I think that this would have been super helpful in determining the origins of his core belief. I really like how you mentioned religious beliefs. That was not something I considered but I think would be extremely informative when explored.

      Reply

    • Allie Supernor
      Oct 22, 2020 @ 11:05:59

      Hi Eileen, I had a very similar experience as you. I genuinely saw the relationship between event, negative automatic thoughts, emotions/behaviors and outcomes. For me, this relationship was most illustrated in the before section, too! Whenever I get embarrassed or anxious I feel it in my body. The NATR allowed me to link those sensations to a specific negative automatic thought instead of an overall feeling/experience.

      Reply

  6. Alison Kahn
    Oct 21, 2020 @ 23:01:10

    Automatic Thoughts:
    (1) The NATR helped me to understand the relationship between events, negative automatic thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and outcomes because it provided me with a visual of cause and effect. That is, I was able to write out the events and responses so that I could actually see the way the event and my reaction unfolded on paper, and I could also identify patterns of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors as I recorded different events. I think noticing these patterns (i.e., when x happens, my response is y”) helped me to better understand the impact of the specific negative automatic thought, which will ultimately be helpful in modifying it. It also was really interesting to contemplate body sensations as a result of events and the impact physiological symptoms have on my behavioral response.

    (2) I found the most helpful part of the after portion of the NATR to be the alternative outcomes section. I found it really relieving to see how positive the alternative outcomes were when I was able to “review” the event and my responses from a different perspective. Physically and emotionally re-experiencing the event after engaging in Socratic techniques helped me to see that I am able to experience the same potentially distressing event in a much more positive and adaptive way.

    Core Beliefs:
    (1) The CBF-A is an effective method for understanding how the client’s core beliefs developed because it helps the client to explore past events, circumstances, and interpersonal interactions that may have contributed to the development or reinforcement of the core belief. Specifically, the client is able to recall social interactions, relationships with others, and thoughts related to those experiences. This provides insight to the clinician regarding the origins of the core belief and the subsequent events that followed which may have further reinforced the belief. It helps the clinician to identify specific individuals that may have shaped the core belief.

    (2) I think obtaining more historical information as it relates to the client’s relationship with his parents and the experience of their divorce would have been useful to better understand the development of the client’s core belief. The client spoke a lot about his experiences with peers in high-school and college, but I would have been interested to hear more about his childhood and his relationship with his mother, father, and relevant family members. I would also be interested to learn about the client’s past romantic relationships.

    Reply

    • Selene Anaya
      Oct 22, 2020 @ 15:55:36

      Hi Alison! I really like how you said that identifying patterns in our negative automatic thought can help us to understand them better and more importantly helpful in modifying the thought. Noticing and understanding my bodily sensations coming from my thought was also very eye-opening for me. I also thought it was insightful that the alternative outcomes section of the NATR allowed you to see that the same distressing event can be experienced in a more adaptive way. You worded that really well. I also mentioned that it is possible that some events have reinforced Mark’s belief of being unliked and that I would have liked to learn more about Mark’s childhood and his relationship with his parents to better understand that experience.

      Reply

    • Christopher LePage
      Oct 22, 2020 @ 19:20:15

      Hi Alison,
      I liked how you mentioned that you felt that the NATR was beneficial to you understanding the relationship between the various concepts mentioned above, as you were able to unfold the situation as you went along. This could be so helpful for some clients, as this may be an option for clients to practice themselves for them to understand the situation better. I also liked how you included in the Core Belief Flowchart that you would have liked to add the individuals’ childhood as well. This was something that I had included as well, because a large part of the development of how we view ourselves is within our childhood, and it should be something that is looked at with regard to core beliefs.

      Reply

  7. Christopher LePage
    Oct 22, 2020 @ 14:42:11

    1) The NATR did in fact help me “see” the relationship between event, negative automatic thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and outcomes. I think the reason that it helped me, because you had to be self-aware of the situation/event that you were in. In life, I think sometimes we just go through the motions without stopping to understand what is going on. For instance, if we did not have to record these negative automatic thoughts, I would have just carried on with my day, and potentially allow those thoughts to carry on into the next situation/event. By forcing myself to become more self-aware I was able to take a second to look at the situation as a whole, thus understanding the situation more.
    2) The Socratic method that helped me was alternative thoughts. For me I thought this was the most helpful, because often your initial thoughts may not accurately represent the situation. Sometimes when presented new information we can have a quick, negative, kneejerk reaction without really understanding the situation as a whole. That is why I found the alternative thoughts to be most helpful, as it can provide alternative outcomes.
    3) I think the CBF-A is an effective way of understanding how an individual’s core beliefs are developed. What is so helpful with the chart, is the fact that it focuses on the past, historical events and how the interact and influence behavioral patterns today. This is accomplished through gathering information about your client through sessions concerning their past, and any major-life events. Once you get an understanding of how these things influence how the client views themselves you can apply these concepts to specific examples. For instance, when a client brings up a situation you can look at said situation, and make the connection that these thoughts are stemming from their core beliefs.
    4) Some things that I think would be beneficial to add are past relationships/figures in the client’s life. Sometimes individuals can have major implications as to why a person feels the way they do about themselves. I would also like to look at the family upbringing, and the different dynamics within the family as these things are crucial in the development of an individual.

    Reply

  8. Selene Anaya
    Oct 22, 2020 @ 15:17:20

    [Automatic Thoughts] –

    (1) The Negative Automatic Thought Record definitely helped me to see the relationship between event, negative automatic thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and outcomes. It encouraged me to think of the little pieces that I think a lot of us tend to skip over when trying to identify the reason for the thought. It also allowed me to think of ways I can cope with and help myself in each step itself. For example, I noticed that I had specific emotions and physiological sensations that happened because of the thought. Instead of saying I will just change my thought, I thought of ways to cope with the physiological sensations I was feeling such as deep breathing or doing something that would relax me and take away those intense bodily sensations. Even writing down my feelings and thoughts alone was helpful in taking some of the intense feelings away.

    (2) I believe thinking through the Socratic techniques was the most helpful in completing the “after” portion of the NATR. I feel this way because even just reading through the possible techniques, I found myself believing my automatic thought less. Through answering the two techniques that I chose, I was able to bring to mind a lot that contradicted or made the negative automatic thought less valid. I chose to answer the fourth Socratic technique which was exploring the outcome of believing my thought and what could be the outcome of changing my thought. This made me think that it was possible believing this thought would make me perform even worse, which was probably the overarching worry. Therefore, I put more effort into trying to see how I could help myself and not let the negative outcome occur. I also was able to realize the steps that I have already taken to help myself through my situation which I had forgotten about originally when I was examining my negative thought.

    [Core Beliefs] –

    (1) The CBF-A is effective in understanding how the clients’ core beliefs developed because it allows the client and therapist to explore together where the belief could have stemmed from. In Mark’s case, it seems as though there are a few specific instances where his core belief of him being unliked came from. The first instance was in high school and then I believe the core belief was reinforced when a similar situation occurred shortly after during his second semester of college with his roommate. With this information, we can then use techniques to examine past situations and understand the situations better in hopes of modifying the core belief in the end. It is helpful in taking one step closer to the goal of modifying the core belief.

    (2) I would have liked to go more in-depth about his relationship with his parents. We know that he is an only child, and he said that his parents had high expectations for him, but I’m curious how Mark would classify his relationship with them. It is a long stretch, but it could be possible that something regarding attention or validation could have been scarce in his relationship with his parents and he turned to seek validation from his peers. I would have also liked to know more about his positive relationships that he still seems to have and see if there are ever any of these thoughts in those relationships as well.

    Reply

    • Trey Powers
      Oct 24, 2020 @ 19:20:25

      Hey Selene!

      I also thought that looking more into Mark’s relationship with his parents would be beneficial. Significant relationships, like between parents and children, can have a lasting impact on an individual, for better or for worse. Even decades later, Mark may still be holding on to some internalized beliefs about himself as a result of his upbringing. I think that exploring this possibility would potentially open the door to additional things that may need to be worked on in order for Mark to not be as self-critical.

      Reply

    • Brigitte Manseau
      Oct 24, 2020 @ 23:15:48

      Hi Selene,
      I like that you mentioned how you also focused on coping with the physiological sensations. With this exercise, I found myself increasingly aware of my body sensations. I coped by doing a deep breathing exercise as well. Coping with the body sensations and quieting down my mind allowed me to later focus on the Socratic techniques. I agree with you, the Socratic techniques section was the most beneficial part of the after section of the NATR. Examining the evidence for and against my thought helped me see how silly it was.

      Reply

  9. Trey Powers
    Oct 22, 2020 @ 15:41:41

    Automatic Thoughts
    1.
    I found that completing the NATR was an interesting experience. I generally do not pay much attention to the random thoughts that are going through my mind, whether positive or negative. Most of the time, they simply dart in and out of my mind. Forcing myself to actively consider my automatic thoughts therefore brought a great deal more attention to them, and I was able to have a better understanding of what was going on in my mind as the day went on. Although it was sometimes unpleasant to put so much focus on the negative automatic thoughts, I think that overall it is beneficial for understanding one’s own thought processes and tendencies to go down certain paths while thinking about a situation.
    2.
    I think that the most useful technique that was used afterward was examining the evidence. I realize that I have a tendency to automatically accept certain thoughts, or believe certain assumptions that I make throughout the day, without really taking an objective look at them. By documenting these thoughts and then questioning them as to their legitimacy based on how much evidence there was both for and against the thoughts, it becomes easier to disprove the negative thoughts.

    Core Beliefs
    1.
    The CBF-A is a useful way of helping to determine how an individual’s core beliefs were originally formed. Because core beliefs are deeply engrained, generally accepted to be true, and seen as simply “the way things are,” they can be difficult to identify to begin with, let alone to determine when and how they were formed. By using historical information from the individual’s past, the CBF-A allows the client and counselor to identify moments in the client’s past that may have let to the formation of the client’s negative core beliefs, and provide information on how to go about modifying these beliefs to be more accurate or positive.
    2.
    I would have liked to gather more information on Mark’s family in order to facilitate the process even more. Family members, and especially parents, are often the first individuals that we have contact with, and have an extreme amount of influence on our development throughout our upbringing. Although Mark briefly mentions his parents’ high expectations potentially being linked to his self-critical nature, I would have liked to dwell on those experiences more to gain additional information about how else his parents may have impacted him, as well as how the divorce may have affected him.

    Reply

    • Brigitte Manseau
      Oct 24, 2020 @ 22:49:08

      Hi Trey,
      I found examining the evidence to be the most helpful Socratic technique as well. I thought of more things that contradicted my negative automatic thought than things that supported it. Reading over the longer list of things written against my negative automatic thought helped invalidate the thought and gave me a sense of relief. Regarding part 2 of your post, it would be helpful to further explore the family dynamics Mark grew up with. I agree, his parents and other family members have contributed to his negative core belief. Therefore, it is important to understand exactly how they have shaped Mark’s negative core belief.

      Reply

  10. Brigitte Manseau
    Oct 22, 2020 @ 15:47:45

    1a The Negative Automatic Thought Record helped me realize the relationship between the event, my negative automatic thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and outcomes. The emotions section of the NATR helped me the most. If we had not previously talked about how upset is not an emotion I would have just put that down. Using a couple emotions to describe what upset meant to me in that moment helped pinpoint exactly what I was feeling. Also, I was able to make the connection between a few body sensations that seemed to perpetuate my negative thoughts which heightened my emotional response.
    b. The Socratic techniques I used were “examine the evidence” and “explore possible alternative explanations.” When I examined the evidence, I thought of only a couple things that supported my thought whereas I thought of several things that contradicted my thought. Once I read over the contradictions I had written down it was easier to see that my thought was not valid. Also, exploring a possible alternative explanation helped me. I figured out the pandemic was a contributing factor to the actual event.

    2a There are several ways that the Core Belief Flowchart— Part A is effective in understanding how clients’ core beliefs develop. By asking questions relating to the client’s past, the client and the clinician are able to get a better understanding of what experiences/factors contributed to the client’s negative core belief. Exploring certain past experiences with the client will allow the clinician to get a better idea of how to modify the client’s negative core beliefs. .
    b. There is additional historical information that I would want to obtain from Mark. He briefly mentioned his parents’ divorce during the video. I would want to know about his relationship with each of his parents before and after the divorce. I’d ask about his childhood (before adolescence) to see if he could remember any times he felt unlikable. Also, I would be interested in knowing about his past romantic partners, childhood friends, and other family members he grew up with

    Reply

    • Eileen Kinnane
      Oct 23, 2020 @ 17:37:13

      Hi Brigitte! I also used “examine the evidence” as a technique. For me, finding evidence that supported my thought was exceptionally helpful because while my thought was negative and hurtful to an extent, validating my thought made me feel less “crazy” and in turn, made me feel more motivated to adapt it.

      Reply

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Adam M. Volungis, PhD, LMHC

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