Topic 11b: CBT Competence [Part 2] {by 4/27}

For this discussion, share at least two main thoughts: (1) Can you think of any other ways, beyond those noted in the chapter, to maintain your competence as a CBT therapist?  (2) What are some possible negative outcomes if you do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills?

 

Your original post should be posted by 4/27.  Have your two replies posted no later than 4/29.  *Please remember to click the “reply” button when posting a reply.  This makes it easier for the reader to follow the blog postings.

38 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Ashley Foster
    Apr 17, 2020 @ 08:06:25

    1. When looking at ways to maintain competence as a CBT therapist, there are many tasks and techniques professional can use to uphold their skills. One way that was not mentioned it talking to collogues in the field who are up to date and practicing. This approach can help not only clarify skills, but therapist can gain insight by bouncing ideas of skills and how other professionals utilize different CBT tools. Another thought is therapists can utilize these skills by practicing these techniques until they know them in full. This may mean each week; therapist learn a new skill or technique and implement It in their practice. This way, the therapist can have not only time and experience with the skill, but also manipulate it in finding what works for them and their style.

    2. If therapist do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills, there may be negative outcomes to follow. First, there clients do not get what they could be getting when coming in. This hurts the clients as we should be giving them the highest possible chance of being successful based on the skills we pass on. If we are not up to date, they will be missing out on skills and that effect could be detrimental. Also, if therapist do not practice these skills and knowledge, they could miss information or even pass on skills that are being done incorrectly. This again hurts the client as these practices are meant to be used in full to embody the greatest effect of treatment outcomes.

    Reply

    • Jess Costello
      Apr 17, 2020 @ 11:19:00

      Hi Ashley! I agree with your ideas about bouncing ideas off of colleagues and other clinicians to maintain skills. You also made a good point about manipulating basic skills to fit individual clinical styles, and I think this is also an important facet to remember. We do not want our therapy sessions to feel like we are following a point-by-point manual.

      I also agree that poor maintenance of clinical skills could result in harm to the clients we serve. We have to keep up to date with new practices in our field in order to best help the population we serve get the progress they need out of therapy.

      Reply

    • Taylor O'Rourke
      Apr 21, 2020 @ 12:25:02

      Hi Ashley!

      You make a really good point that it could be potentially harmful to continue to treat clients with outdated skills/techniques. It is our duty as therapists the provide our client with the most up to date and scientifically based techniques that will provide them with a better quality of life and the skills to eventually become their own therapists. If therapists are choosing to use outdated techniques, this could certainly hold the client back from receiving a better treatment option that could help them in the short- and long-term, more so than an outdated treatment would.

      Reply

    • Renee Gaumond
      Apr 23, 2020 @ 17:51:27

      Hi Ashley,
      I agree with you when you said that talking to colleagues would help improve competence. I think talking to colleagues with a variety of experience levels would be helpful to gain competence as a CBT practitioner. It would allow you to be exposed to many different ideas and versions of techniques. Talking to experience colleagues would allow you to get advice on how to reach expertise. Also talking to colleagues that are around your experience level would open you up to new ways of handling challenges within therapy.

      Reply

  2. Jess Costello
    Apr 17, 2020 @ 10:50:37

    1. I think the biggest resource therapists can use in maintaining CBT skills, especially early in their careers, is consulting with colleagues about specific practices as well as updates and new ideas in the field. This way we can help each other stay current and monitor how we are doing.

    2. If therapists do not stay up to date with current CBT trends, knowledge, and empirical findings, they will not be able to offer their clients the best services or eventual outcomes of treatment. Worse than receiving subpar treatment, lapses in clinical skills could also result in clients being harmed or experiencing even more distress than what they had started with.

    Reply

    • Melanie Sergel
      Apr 19, 2020 @ 16:44:07

      Hi Jess! I also think that consulting with colleagues is a useful way to maintain CBT skills and knowledge. We can learn from others and gain insight from them when it is needed. I agree with you that if we do not stay up to date with current CBT trends, knowledge, and empirical findings, then we will not be providing the best services to our clients. They also will not receive proper treatment leading them to possibly be harmed, like you said. Great job!

      Reply

    • Erin Wilbur
      Apr 20, 2020 @ 09:18:47

      Hi Jess,
      You make a good point that not keeping up to date with news and empirical findings in the field can possibly even cause the client more distress. If a client enters therapy and it seems like their therapist doesn’t know how to do effective therapy, or struggles to help the client, it can be very off-putting. If the therapist continues to be unhelpful, or the client can tell that they aren’t receiving the care they should be, not only will they want to terminate therapy, it may prevent them from trying again and returning to therapy even if they need it. If there is a possibility of this type of negative outcome happening as a result of therapists not keeping up to date with CBT news and skills, there should be no excuse for these therapists to continue practicing without doing this.

      Reply

    • Taylor O'Rourke
      Apr 21, 2020 @ 12:31:26

      Hi Jess!

      You make an interesting point that we should take advantage of talking with our colleagues who may have more CBT experience than us to be able to learn new techniques and check in to be sure you are using them correctly. Of course expertise with therapy develops over time with practice, so this is why using colleagues or even a supervisor at the training level is a great resource. Although there is the issue of confidentiality and sharing information from clients, therapists do have the right to discuss their concerns about their clients with their colleagues and supervisor if they have one.

      Reply

    • Renee Gaumond
      Apr 23, 2020 @ 18:06:00

      Hi Jess,
      I like your point that therapists who don’t keep up with the current knowledge of cognitive behavioral therapy would be doing a disservice to the clients. In a sense they would be using outdated techniques instead of newer, more empirical based ones. It’s always best to be updated in the field since our clients are vulnerable to the techniques and knowledge that we decide to use within the sessions. Using outdated knowledge and techniques could cause more distress to the client.

      Reply

  3. Jenna Nikolopoulos
    Apr 17, 2020 @ 16:04:02

    1. One of the ways to maintain your competence as a CBT therapist is to continuously practice your skills, especially the ones that you don’t use as often, to make sure that you are confident in your abilities to utilize them and know how to implement them properly and effectively. Even for the most basic skills that we use all the time, it’s always important to practice the basics because those are the skills we should be most experienced in using. Another way to maintain your competence is by making sure to keep up to date on the newest ideas in the field by reading articles, watching videos, or even participating in training sessions. Lastly, interacting with colleagues helps maintain competency because you are can discuss certain practices and receive clarification on skills to help you better your skillset, which will help you provide better treatments to your clients.

    2. One possible negative outcome is that you could be doing more harm to your clients than good because you’re lacking the skills and knowledge needed to effectively and properly implement CBT techniques that would benefit your clients, which could also lead you to teach these techniques incorrectly to your clients. Trying to practice these techniques without the skills or knowledge to do and teaching your clients the incorrect way to do these techniques could cause them to become more distressed. This could also lead you to give inferior services to your clients, which could lead to poor treatment outcomes and cause your clients to lose hope and motivation for change, ultimately causing them to drop out of therapy and not seek out other services for help.

    Reply

    • Jess Costello
      Apr 17, 2020 @ 16:46:24

      Hey Jenna! You made a good point about focusing practice on the skills we don’t use as often in therapy sessions. I feel that we may think we don’t need to use those skills as often as the more basic ones, so we don’t keep them strong. But we never know the kinds of interventions future clients will need, so in the interest of providing the best services, we should try to stay up to date on all the CBT techniques we could be using.

      I also agree that you could harm your clients if you’re not effectively using appropriate techniques. It would also damage the reputation of the mental health field in general if clients were not getting any better and did not see the point or value of continuing treatment. Kind of a negative note to end on, but good job with your post!

      Reply

    • Monica K Teeven
      Apr 19, 2020 @ 15:53:12

      Hey Jenna! You made a great point about how if a CBT therapist tries to practice their CBT skills without up to date knowledge about these skills, they can unintentionally perform these skills incorrectly. This could lead the therapist to actually cause more harm than good to their client and could even increase their client’s level of distress even more. This is the exact opposite of what a therapist is supposed to do and this will increase the chances of the client ending therapy and never trying counseling again even though they would greatly benefit receiving effective therapy. Great job on your blog post Jenna!

      Reply

    • Melanie Sergel
      Apr 19, 2020 @ 16:41:14

      HI Jenna! I like that you say that reading articles, watching videos, or even participating in training sessions will help maintain CBT competence. This is important to help maintain our competence because articles are always being written and up to date. This way we can keep up with the newest information about CBT. I also like that you said watching videos because watching videos can be very helpful tool to learn from. Lastly, I also said that training sessions would be a useful way to maintain our competence in CBT. Great job!

      Reply

  4. Melanie Sergel
    Apr 19, 2020 @ 14:59:45

    1. One way that I can maintain my competence as a CBT therapist is by continuing to practice my skills. Also, going to workshops and further CBT trainings will help me maintain my competence as a CBT therapist. Another way is to talk with colleagues and other professionals. Talking with colleagues and other professionals can help maintain my competence by providing me with help in me the areas I need a refresher or more training. Whenever I feel like there is an area where I’m lacking confidence, I can work on improving my skills by practicing techniques with colleagues. There will also be colleagues that can provide me new information in the field that I may not know.

    2. A possible negative outcome if I do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills is that I will not provide high quality CBT that my client needs. Not being up to date with the knowledge and skills of CBT could lead to me not properly executing techniques. This will significantly impact the treatment for the client. It could impact the client by harming them and treatment will not be beneficial for them. The client will then not improve and they may leave, which may result in them not giving counseling another chance due to a bad experience.

    Reply

    • Monica K Teeven
      Apr 19, 2020 @ 15:39:12

      Hey Mel! You made a great point about how not providing the best quality treatment may cause the client to leave therapy and never give counseling another chance again. I have heard of this happening to multiple people I know and it infuriates me because they could really benefit getting therapy! CBT therapists who provide poor quality therapy, does not only hurt their clients chances of receiving effective treatment, it also hurts the reputation of other CBT therapists in the field. Good job on your post Mel!

      Reply

    • Ashley Foster
      Apr 22, 2020 @ 16:48:39

      Hi Mel!
      I agree that one way we can improve and stay up to date with our skills is attending workshops. This can keep us up to date on what is new or emerging into the field, but also it gives us the opportunity to meet other colleagues in the field. By meeting these other individuals, we can learn other skill or other ways to implement skills that have been successful for them into our own sessions. We can also become more informed through these relationships while utilizing them as resources if we come across a road block with a client or need a question answered.
      Great job with the post!

      Reply

  5. Monica K Teeven
    Apr 19, 2020 @ 17:33:35

    1. Another way to maintain competence as a CBT therapist is by talking to other CBT therapists about their experiences with CBT techniques. Discuss which ones have been more helpful than others with regard to certain characteristics of the client. In addition, comparing CBT therapists’ client worksheets could be beneficial because a colleague may have designed a worksheet differently or have an additional feature on the worksheet that you may want to add to your client’s worksheet because it may benefit your client.

    2. One possible outcome would be if you do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge, you may unintentionally be providing CBT treatment that is outdated and has been found to be less effective than it was originally thought to be. This means you were not providing your client with quality therapy. Another possible outcome would be that because you are not up to date with new research on CBT treatments, you would not have known that providing a certain technique can increase the chances of a client having successful results sooner in their treatment process. As a mental health professional we should provide the treatments that are most effective and the shorter the time period required in order for the treatment to be successful the better.

    Reply

    • Erin Wilbur
      Apr 20, 2020 @ 08:55:34

      Hi Monica,
      I like your idea to compare client worksheets with other CBT therapists to see the differences or if they have ideas that make the techniques more effective with their clients. This is a smart way to keep up on things that other professionals are doing, especially if you’re not interested in attending large conferences, or aren’t able to.

      Reply

    • Jenna Nikolopoulos
      Apr 20, 2020 @ 10:28:33

      Hi Monica!! I liked your point on comparing CBT therapists’ client worksheets to maintain competence as a CBT therapist. There is not a universal worksheet that CBT therapists give to their clients to record their automatic thoughts or potential core beliefs core beliefs; there are different versions of client worksheets that are used for the same purpose. I think comparing CBT therapists’ client worksheets would be a great way to see if there is anything missing from your worksheet that you feel you should add to benefit your client. I think comparing worksheets could also help you view the concept in a new perspective and give you new ideas of what you could do to further explore certain problem area with your client.

      Reply

    • Shelby Piekarczyk
      Apr 21, 2020 @ 08:53:20

      Hi Monica,

      I agree that discussing with your colleagues about CBT techniques could help you maintain competence as a CBT therapist. Collaborating with other CBT therapists can help to strengthen your understanding of each technique and also help in areas that may seem a bit fuzzy. Additionally, gaining insight to how your colleague may view a specific technique or ways that they have found to successfully implement it can help you in your future sessions with clients. This will help you to become a competent CBT therapist, and give each client the best treatment. Great job!

      Reply

    • Mariah Fraser
      Apr 30, 2020 @ 18:42:11

      Hi Monica!

      I liked the idea you suggested of comparing CBT worksheets as a way to learn more beneficial and effective ways of formatting them or even adding other worksheets to supplement the ones in current use. This is a great way to expand knowledge in a simple fashion that encourages consultation with colleagues.

      Reply

  6. Erin Wilbur
    Apr 20, 2020 @ 08:32:58

    (1) Can you think of any other ways, beyond those noted in the chapter, to maintain your competence as a CBT therapist? (2) What are some possible negative outcomes if you do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills?

    1. One way to maintain my competence as a CBT therapist is by keeping up to date with new research and techniques in the CBT field so that I can continue to practice them in session. I think continuing to use the skills I’ve learned in session with my clients and discussing these techniques with my colleagues would be an effective way to maintain my competence as a CBT therapist. Getting feedback and discussing challenges with other mental health professionals will help me to continue to be an effective therapist.
    2. Some negative outcomes if I don’t stay up to date with CBT skills are looking unprofessional, both in session with clients and with other professionals in the field. I also won’t be as effective in therapy with clients, which impacts their development of adaptive coping skills and independence. I may also do techniques wrong or start to forget certain aspects of treatment if I don’t keep up with trainings and new information in the field, which will harm my clients and slow their progress.

    Reply

    • Jenna Nikolopoulos
      Apr 20, 2020 @ 10:42:51

      Hi Erin! I totally agree with your thoughts on the possible negative outcomes that can occur if you don’t stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills. I think looking unprofessional is one of the main outcomes that can occur. As therapists, we’re supposed to have the knowledge and skillset to help clients learn the skills needed to change their thoughts, emotions, and behaviors after therapy is terminated. If we’re not keeping informed about new knowledge in the field, we look incompetent to our colleagues, which could cause them to question our judgement and practices with clients. And, as you said, our inadequate knowledge will affect our clients because we won’t be giving them the best quality of treatment they deserve, which will only harm their progress.

      Reply

    • Shelby Piekarczyk
      Apr 21, 2020 @ 08:51:04

      Hi Erin,

      I agree that keeping up with research and the field itself will help you maintain your competence as a CBT therapist. I also agree that the continuation of practice with these skills will help to maintain competence in CBT and help your confidence when implementing each technique. Practicing each skill will ultimately help you gain confidence as a CBT therapist and help you to continue to learn and improve on each skill. I agree that practicing is a key component in maintaining your competence as a CBT therapist. Lastly, I agree completely that by not staying up to date with your CBT skills that you could look unprofessional. If you do not feel confident or secure with your skills this will show to your client and harm the therapeutic relationship. Great job!

      Reply

    • Mariah Fraser
      Apr 30, 2020 @ 18:43:53

      Hi Erin!

      I agree with what you said about looking unprofessional to colleagues and clients if you fail to stay up to date with the most recent techniques that are more effective. It would not only damage your reputation, but it would also be a disservice to clients because you are unable to provide them the best quality of care.

      Reply

  7. Shelby Piekarczyk
    Apr 21, 2020 @ 08:47:31

    1. There are many ways that one can maintain their competence as a CBT therapist. The first way would be continuing to practice the skills you have learned throughout your education. By practicing your skills, it will help keep you current and can also help to continue the learning process. Practicing your skills can also help you to continue to improve, becoming more comfortable with each technique. By continuing to practice your skills it will also help you become more confident in yourself and as a professional. Another way to maintain your skills is collaborating with other professionals and learning from their knowledge/experiences.

    2. A negative outcome if I do not stay up to date on these techniques is not being entirely confident in implementing them. If I am not confident in myself to accurately practice these skills it will show in the therapy sessions. This not only will harm the quality of CBT treatment I am giving, but also impact my client as well. The client can ultimately sense my incompetence, which can lead to them doubting therapy and harming the therapeutic relationship. This could also impact my future as a CBT therapist because my confidence may always be lacking, having a sense of being behind.

    Reply

    • Ashley Foster
      Apr 22, 2020 @ 16:40:24

      Hi Shelby!
      I agree that without staying out to date and not practicing techniques of CBT we can loose our confidence in implementing them. This not only make us as a therapist not look desirable to work with but this also takes away from the client in treatment. Not staying up to date does not make us competent therapist, rather we open the opportunities for our clients to not be as successful as they could be. Staying up to date, we can implement newer and possibly more effective tools and techniques to our clients to promote their success.
      Great job with the post.

      Reply

    • Madison Armstrong
      Apr 25, 2020 @ 13:19:00

      Hi Shelby,

      You made a great point about losing confidence in implementing techniques if we do not stay up to date. This could potentially show your client that you are incompetent if they are picking up on your outdated techniques. The client may lose motivation for change if they are sensing your incompetence. This could be damaging to the client because they will not be receiving the most beneficial treatment.

      Reply

  8. Taylor O'Rourke
    Apr 21, 2020 @ 12:09:04

    1. Can you think of any other ways, beyond those noted in the chapter, to maintain your competence as a CBT therapist?

    I think one of the best ways to maintain competence as a CBT therapist is to observe other master clinicians in the field. There are many videos available on YouTube such as ones we have watched in class in our CBT program that exhibit big names in the field like Aaron Beck conducting a session with a client. These are great resources to use to help develop your own CBT skills because there is no one better to learn from than the founders of CBT and those who have truly made an impact in the field. There is easy access to these types of resources, so along with observing therapists in real life as the chapter described, I think it is also useful to watch some of the best examples on YouTube and other video sources.

    2. What are some possible negative outcomes if you do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills?

    If you do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills, you run the risk of not providing the best, most effective therapy to clients. It is important for therapists to participate in continuing education post-graduation; this way, they can learn the most up to date and effective CBT skills and techniques to use with their clients. If therapists who have practiced for many years post-graduation continued to use the same skills and techniques, these may no longer be the best available options for the client. Clients deserve to have treatment that is effective and based on science. Without staying up to date, therapists could possibly be providing treatment that no longer has empirical support undermining it.

    Reply

    • Tim Keir
      Apr 29, 2020 @ 21:28:26

      Hey Taylor!

      I absolutely agree that learning from the best can only make us better. As the saying goes, it is perfect practice that makes perfect. I still think there is value in watching those clinicians who are still learning like us, however; seeing a mistake in someone else can be informative on what to avoid in our own practice. Youtube is a great resource for both.

      We absolutely have to maintain our connection to the cutting edge of psychological science! Otherwise we may miss knowledge that allows us to better treat our clients. Knowledge is absolutely power in this domain.

      Reply

  9. Madison Armstrong
    Apr 24, 2020 @ 15:38:24

    (1) Can you think of any other ways, beyond those noted in the chapter, to maintain your competence as a CBT therapist?

    I think that one way I can maintain my competence as a CBT therapist is to establish connections with other professionals who also practice CBT. It would be a great resource to be able to discuss certain techniques and new findings with others in the field. This will expand my knowledge base by sharing with others what we learn and what we find to work with certain populations of clients. As noted in the chapter, the techniques we practice today will be much different 15 years from now so it would be important to stay up to date with literature and empirically supported techniques. With new techniques means the need to practice them before using them with clients. We should always be practicing on ourselves as well as with others before using them with clients.

    (2) What are some possible negative outcomes if you do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills?

    One potential negative outcome if I do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills is becoming outdated in the practice of these skills. If I am only using the techniques that I have learned in graduate school far into the future, then I will appear incompetent to other professionals and clients. Providing client with outdated techniques would cause unnecessary harm to them, especially if there are new techniques established that would be more beneficial.

    Reply

    • Tim Keir
      Apr 29, 2020 @ 21:33:16

      Hey Madison!

      Keeping healthy connections with fellow psychologists is absolutely vital – great point! I like your point that we must continue practicing on ourselves as well. We should always be comfortable with our practices and ourselves – applying CBT skills to our own concerns is the most efficient way to do both.

      Incompetence is truly a concern of mine – I don’t want to be the psychologist still practicing the next Rorschach after the field has moved to more empirical approaches. Staying abreast of the latest information is the most surefire way to maintain professional skill. Let’s strive to be the best we can be!

      Reply

  10. Robert Salvucci
    Apr 24, 2020 @ 18:50:16

    1. Maintaining competence will require a combination of continued practice, learning, and openness to being flexible with our approach to therapy. We can hone our skills by continuing to practice them with clients and reading literature and writing by professionals in the field. We can consult with our colleagues to strengthen our knowledge and bounce ideas off one another. Continuing to practice the techniques on ourselves will also keep us feeling confident with CBT and growing personally. An attitude of openness/flexibility will allow us to change our techniques if needed as new research comes out, as well as adopting new techniques. Finding outlets to teach CBT based skills can keep us sharp and responsible for providing quality information. Lastly, practicing skills that strengthen our ability to conduct therapy effectively in general allows us to be more helpful, compassionate, and objective with clients. This includes taking care of ourselves, being mindful of our biases, consulting with colleagues, staying up to date with the field, practicing attentive listening, etc..

    2. Falling out of practice with CBT knowledge and skills will slowly make our practice as a therapist less effective. This will lead to poor outcomes for our clients. It is our responsibility as mental health professionals to keep our skills and knowledge reasonably sharp. Practicing skills more effectively directly translates to improved quality of life for the many people we work with. We may also miss out on the opportunity to learn novel techniques that are shown to be effective.

    Reply

    • Madison Armstrong
      Apr 25, 2020 @ 13:25:12

      Hi Bobby,

      I like that you mentioned that having an open and flexible attitude is one way that we can maintain competence as a CBT therapist. I think that our attitude towards learning new skills and willingness to practice these skills will definitely contribute to our continued competence in this field. If we were unwilling to be flexible, we would continue to practice the techniques that could eventually become outdated and could cause potential harm to clients. Our clients deserve to have treatment that is backed by research so being open to learning new techniques and expanding our knowledge is essential.

      Reply

  11. Tim Keir
    Apr 27, 2020 @ 21:52:58

    1. Can you think of other ways to maintain your competence as a CBT therapist?

    All of the most obvious routes of extra classes, readings, observations and supervisions were already mentioned. A great way to hone skills would be to continue doing roleplays! Practicing different therapeutic techniques with whoever is willing to sit down and pretend to be a cleint is a great way to practice CBT skills in a way similar to actual sessions. Furthermore, adding in different aspects of particularly challenging cases (with enough information changed to not be an ethical violation) could help a clinician work through novel ways to deal with the presenting problems.

    2. What are some possible negative outcomes if you do not stay up to date with CBT knowledge and skills?

    There is a great phrase I heard the other day about work stagnation: you either have 5 years of experience, or 1 year of experience 5 times. Not continuing your education in CBT and keeping abreast of changes in the theory will ensure that your own professional skills stagnate. Even worse than simply staying in place, it is likely that one’s CBT skills would in fact regress and become sloppy over time. Without some form of supervision or refresher on skills, professionals gradually forget the minutiae of their skills until only a crude remnant remains. It is only ethical that a professional psychologist practices what is known to be the most effective strategies in whatever form of case they are working with. Anything less is negligence.

    Reply

    • Robert Salvucci
      Apr 30, 2020 @ 23:47:35

      Hey Tim!

      Roleplays would definitely be helpful moving forward. Highlighting challenging components of cases could also be particularly useful in honing skills and brainstorming how to approach difficult scenarios. Practicing skills can also have parallels with how we process information ourselves and how we converse with others.

      I love the getting one year of experience five times phrase. Skills can certainly stagnate when they are not refreshed.

      Reply

  12. Mariah Fraser
    Apr 28, 2020 @ 01:47:00

    1. Therapists can maintain competence in CBT by continuously practicing skills and techniques on themselves and others. It’s important to feel comfortable implementing the skills that are necessary for effective CBT within sessions. Talking with other therapists may also be helpful in maintaining competence because there could be something that is taken from those conversations that wasn’t known or considered before. Additionally, keeping up to date with research regarding new techniques is important because there are always new and better ways of achieving the same goals. Just because something was learned in through formal training doesn’t mean that there won’t be other ways of doing CBT that are shown to be just as effective in less time. Just as talking with other therapists can be helpful in learning something new, it can also serve as a way to get constructive feedback or professional consultation that will only help to improve the effectiveness of the therapist.

    2. If therapists do not stay up to date, they risk doing a disservice to their clients because the quality of care that should be provided is not happening as a result of a lack of knowledge. Being stuck in the same ways as a result of failing to stay updated on the latest techniques and knowledge causes unnecessary harm to clients, and it also damages the reputation and credibility of the therapist. This impedes the progression through therapy as well as derails the ultimate goal of treatment, which is to teach clients the skills that are shown to be most helpful for people who face similar problems.

    Reply

    • Robert Salvucci
      Apr 30, 2020 @ 23:55:34

      Hey Mariah!

      Being more comfortable with techniques definitely leads to being able to implement them more effectively and improve on them more easily. Skills can also be refined as new research comes out, and be made more effective and efficient. Constructive criticism and integrating different perspectives can help build skills. As you noted, allowing skills to slip can damage our reputation and make teaching techniques more difficult.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Adam M. Volungis, PhD, LMHC

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 58 other followers

%d bloggers like this: