Topic 10b: CBT Myths [Part 2] (by 4/20)

For this discussion, share at least two main thoughts: (1) What negative effects can such myths have on the mental health field and quality of care provided to clients?  (2) What can you do to help dispel some of these myths?

 

Your original post should be posted by 4/20.  Have your two replies posted no later than 4/22.  *Please remember to click the “reply” button when posting a reply.  This makes it easier for the reader to follow the blog postings.

40 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Robert Salvucci
    Apr 10, 2020 @ 20:16:21

    1. These myths can create unfounded stigma around certain evidence-based approaches. This can lead to a distrust of techniques within the professional community and potentially from clients. When unfounded or poorly argued criticisms become prominent, it can make it more difficult for practitioners to make informed decisions regarding treatment. Shying away from effective CBT techniques based on misconceptions can result in the revival of or continued use of approaches that have substantial evidence suggesting they are ineffective. This can lead to a development of distrust towards mental health professionals and an unnecessary continuation of symptoms for clients that could have been effectively treated.

    2. It’s important to be vocal while being respectful; particularly if we hear myths being presented that we are confident to be untrue and we can speak intelligently to refute. It is also important that we do not become overly cocky and we remain humble entering the field. We will likely have more influence and be respected more by our colleagues if we don’t overstep our knowledge or approach conversations with an antagonistic attitude. It is unwise to be snobby about our own convictions or talk down to those who we disagree with. We all have some responsibility to stay educated and speak to what we have been extensively trained in. We can also utilize a variety of online platforms or other educational mediums to educate the public and spark conversation within the field.

    Reply

    • Jess Costello
      Apr 13, 2020 @ 12:23:53

      Hi Bobby! You made a good point about these myths causing widespread distrust both within the mental health profession and with our clients. If clinicians offer treatments that have little empirical support, they will probably have ineffective outcomes and clients will continue to experience the same problems they had when they started. This decreases the reputation of mental health care as a worthy endeavor.

      I also liked your point about not talking down to clinicians who may come from different backgrounds. Sparking conversation is better than appearing too antagonistic. Good job with your post!

      Reply

    • Renee Gaumond
      Apr 14, 2020 @ 10:30:43

      Hi Bobby,
      I really agree with your second point. People will respect us in the field more if we are humble rather than elitist to CBT. Respecting other approaches will gain us respect. Advocating for our practice is definitely different from being cocky about it.

      Reply

    • Ashley Foster
      Apr 15, 2020 @ 21:37:23

      Hey Bobby! I like the point that you mentioned about distrust of the techniques within the professional community and for our clients. As report building is one of the hardest and most important aspects of the therapeutic relationship, these negative effects from these myths only make it that much harder. Ask the therapist, is our job to reel in our clients so they can do the work that is needed to pull them out of their distress or dysregulation. If we cannot get our clients in the door or get our clients to trust us do too misinformation, and that leaves our clients with less options and less potential of success. Great job with the posts!

      Reply

  2. Jess Costello
    Apr 11, 2020 @ 18:21:07

    1. Myths about CBT can create misconceptions about our practices both within the broader counseling field in colleagues of other orientations, and among clients and potential clients. If clients fear CBT’s reputation or opt for a treatment with less empirical support, they may be doing themselves a disservice by choosing a technique that is less likely to bring about relief from their problems by just treating symptoms. Sadly, if clients shy away from CBT, not only will they experience longer and more debilitating distress, but these unfounded myths will continue to persist because clients are not gaining appropriate experiences to refute them.

    2. Just as in treatment when we validate our clients’ emotions and thoughts before beginning the process of changing them, I think that we have to start by validating the parts of these myths that may be grounded in reality. For example, the idea that CBT is too rigid, structured, or scientific and inappropriate for people without high levels of functioning may be a dramatic distortion of the truth that CBT relies on empirical evidence to inform treatments. We cannot change minds or improve CBT’s reputation by insisting that people who are simply not as educated about CBT’s effectiveness and do not share our training are wrong and misinformed. In order to dispel some of these myths, we have to adopt a mindset that is welcoming and educational rather than antagonistic and demeaning towards other approaches.

    Reply

    • Monica K Teeven
      Apr 13, 2020 @ 11:01:18

      Hi Jess! An important factor that you mentioned in your response to question 1, is that clients who are more reluctant to try CBT may increase their chances of experiencing their negative symptoms longer and their level of distress can continue to debilitate them. This is an important factor because these myths can obstruct from providing quality and affective care treatments to individuals who are suffering. In addition, in your response to the 2nd question, you state that we need “to adopt a mindset that is welcoming” in order to help dispel some of these myths about CBT. I did not mention this in my blog post, but this is a huge factor in increasing other peoples thoughts and beliefs about CBT. Great job on your post Jess!

      Reply

    • Renee Gaumond
      Apr 14, 2020 @ 10:59:50

      Hi Jess,
      I like how you mention that we can start with the myth by addressing what part is grounded in reality. Validation is a good way to start with change. It allows the other side to open up to the conversation when you validate their thoughts. If someone were to go into a debate by saying how wrong the other person is, then that other person is likely to stand their ground and not be as open to the conversation. I think that when validating some parts that are grounded in reality is a good way to show that we’re open to the conversation as well.

      Reply

    • Melanie Sergel
      Apr 14, 2020 @ 13:27:48

      HI Jess! I really like that you point out that validating the parts of the myths that may be grounded in reality while also explaining what is incorrect about them can help dispel some of these myths. By doing so, the individual does not feel a sense that they are completing wrong but that only some of what they believed is invalid. I also like that you make the point that we cannot improve the reputation of CBT by just insisting that the individuals are just wrong. In order to create a good reputation, we have to be welcoming and that is a great point you made. Good job!

      Reply

  3. Monica K Teeven
    Apr 13, 2020 @ 10:33:06

    1.These myths can have negative effects on the mental health field because they can cause ignorance about CBT to persist which could lower the quality of care that is being given to clients. If there are people in the mental health field who believe the CBT myths, even though there is plenty of CBT empirical research to the contrary, this means that they are not basing their mental health practice on heavily supported empirical research. Clients should receive therapy that is based on evidence based therapeutic approaches supported by empirical research. When therapists do no provide evidence based approaches to their clients it is considered unethical because it gives their clients false assumptions about the treatments’ effectiveness. This is especially true since there are many evidence based approaches that have been empirically found to be effective in treatment.

    2. One of the ways I can dispel some of these myths is by allowing colleagues to observe some of my therapy sessions to show them how effective CBT is because demonstrating CBT’s effectiveness would be more meaningful than simply trying to explain its effectiveness. Another way to help dispel some of these myths is by educating your clients and colleagues about what CBT truly is and how effective this therapy is by interacting and participating in trainings with them.

    Reply

    • Jess Costello
      Apr 13, 2020 @ 12:18:08

      Hi Monica! You made a great point about clinicians who believe the myths about CBT not offering the “best”/most empirically supported treatments to their clients, which obviously and sadly impacts negatively the quality of care their clients receive. I think it would also give clients false expectations about both the treatment they receive instead and false biases towards CBT. Clients may not care about the evidence for other approaches or may not believe it’s an important factor in their care.

      I also like the idea of allowing colleagues to observe your sessions–showing is always more effective than telling! Great work.

      Reply

    • Melanie Sergel
      Apr 14, 2020 @ 13:22:41

      Hi Monica! I like that you said that you could dispel some of these myths by allowing colleagues to observe some of your therapy sessions to show them how effective CBT is. I think this would be really beneficial and help dispel some of these myths because the individual can see for themselves how it works. Also, like you said it would be more meaningful than trying to explain it. I think educating clients and colleagues is also important to dispel some of these myths. If the individual does not receive that education or the correction to that myth, then they will continue to believe the myth.

      Reply

    • Taylor O'Rourke
      Apr 14, 2020 @ 14:20:05

      Hi Monica!

      I really like how you brought up ethics in your blog post. I agree that in a way, it is unethical to provide clients treatment that we know either does not work or has a better alternative. Because clients typically do not have the background in mental health counseling that we do and trained therapists do, it is unfair to them to be receiving treatment they think will work well for them when in fact, science and facts show us that these other treatments are not effective. There are many different evidence-based treatments available as you mentioned, so it is important that we give clients a fair chance to be treated with these and nothing else.

      Reply

    • Mariah Fraser
      Apr 14, 2020 @ 22:05:50

      Hi Monica!

      I wrote a similar comment in my post about offering to demonstrate effectiveness by having colleagues observe me conducting sessions because it gives an opportunity for them to learn something new, which would increase their understanding and disprove the myths. I liked that you made the clear distinction that if CBT is not being utilized based off of false information, then clients are receiving treatment that is not based on evidence-based approaches, and thus are not receiving the highest level of quality care.

      Reply

  4. Renee Gaumond
    Apr 14, 2020 @ 09:34:21

    (1)
    These myths can perpetuate the stigma of therapy. Clients may decide therapy isn’t for them based on untrue myths. This leads to people who would benefit from CBT not reaching out for help. They would then try to fix their distress on their own or assume that they are “being too sensitive” or need to “toughen up”. Some clients may also decide on a style of therapy that might not be helpful to them based on the CBT myths. Styles that aren’t as empirically based might not help the client, which could influence the client to cease therapy all together. This would create more stigma about therapy because then clients will think all therapy is like that and is not helpful.

    (2)
    Psychoeducation is one way to help dispel some myths. If people were more aware of the theories behind CBT, then some of the myths that contradict the facts would become less believable. Also providing high quality CBT to clients will increase a positive message about it. If clients make progress and see it from first hand experience, then their opinions of it will improve. They may even advise others in their life to try it too. Making sure that each client is treated well and receives what they need will help the stigma of CBT decrease.

    Reply

    • Mariah Fraser
      Apr 14, 2020 @ 22:05:29

      Hi Renee!

      I thought you made a good point that if other therapies don’t seem like they will help a person who is interested in getting help, then they may be missing out on an opportunity to have a CBT therapist that could accommodate their needs. This could lead people who are experiencing significant distress to attempt to cope on their own (in ways that may only maintain their distress). Further, if they do try therapy and it doesn’t work for one reason or another, then they are less likely to give CBT a try due to the myths surrounding it.

      Reply

  5. Monica K Teeven
    Apr 14, 2020 @ 10:57:50

    Hi Renee! In your response to question 1, you made a great point about clients may decide to go to a therapist whose theoretical orientation is not based on empirical evidence because of the myths about CBT. In addition, you mention that if the client goes to a therapist who offers a theoretical orientation that is not empirically based, and the therapy is unsuccessful, the client may stop going to therapy all together. Therapists who perform therapy and who use a theoretical orientation that lacks in empirical evidence, hurts the mental health field as a whole, not just for therapists who practice CBT. Great job on your post Renee!

    Reply

  6. Melanie Sergel
    Apr 14, 2020 @ 13:19:09

    1.CBT myths can have negative effects on the mental health field and quality of care provided to clients. It can have negative effects because some individuals who are seeking out therapy may be too scared of CBT from hearing these myths from others. Some people will read about what type of therapy they think will work the best for them and if they rely on what they read online it will impact their decision to seek CBT, when in fact, CBT could really benefit them. Also, some individuals may hear the myths of CBT, believe them, then hear further myths of other styles of therapy and will just not go to therapy in general or just try to fix their issues on their own.

    2.I believe there is several things I could do to help dismiss some of these myths. One thing I could do is trying to give someone who believes one or more of these myths the knowledge that I have on that topic. I can also dismiss some of these myths by providing proper CBT to a client and when it helps the client it will show that is beneficial. That client may also go out and share with others that CBT benefited them.

    Reply

    • Taylor O'Rourke
      Apr 14, 2020 @ 14:52:10

      Hi Mel!

      I completely agree with the point you made about these myths scaring people away from CBT treatment. With the myths that are out there like therapists not making connections with their clients, therapists being rigid and not empathic, and CBT therapists not actually helping their clients but instead only make the clients help themselves, this is definitely enough to turn people away from seeking a CBT therapist. I think it is our duty as beginning therapists in training to dispel these myths to promote that CBT is effective and despite these myths, it is a therapy to seek out.

      Reply

    • Shelby Piekarczyk
      Apr 15, 2020 @ 13:14:47

      Hi Mel,

      I think you bring up a great myth, CBT myths will have a large impact on clients seeking out therapists that practice CBT. But myths within the mental health field targeted at every approach can ultimately have an impact on clients seeking out therapy. There is a large stigma around mental health and myths about the approaches within the field are only going to harm clients that truly need help. I agree that sharing our knowledge on CBT myths and our knowledge on myths about other therapy approaches can greatly help individuals within society. By providing evidence on CBT we can help diminish these myths and help clients feel more comfortable about seeking out therapy. Great job!

      Reply

  7. Taylor O'Rourke
    Apr 14, 2020 @ 13:48:47

    1. What negative effects can such myths have on the mental health field and quality of care provided to clients?

    We should care about these myths because CBT therapists represent how others perceive CBT; when we are able, we should address the myths when heard so we can reduce ignorance and increase quality of care provided to clients. In addition, we may be around other mental health providers who use non-evidence-based practices. Decisions made by an agency should be based on fact and science rather than false assumptions and anecdotes. In other words, clients should be receiving therapy based on therapeutic approaches that have a strong empirical basis. Myths should not uphold the therapies that are provided to clients. We should strive to educate other therapists through trainings and interactions in order to refute as many myths as possible. Also, if people hear these myths in the first place, it may keep them away from even attempting therapy in the first place if they do not like what they hear about it.

    2. What can you do to help dispel some of these myths?

    To help dispel some of these myths, therapists can address the myths head on by educating people in order reduce ignorance. Therapists can also provide and attend training sessions to work with individuals who still practice non-evidence-based treatment to teach them ones that are empirically based. Myths can also be dispelled by having people observe CBT therapy sessions. This will help to show its effectiveness, and we know that showing is definitely more effective than simply telling.

    Reply

    • Tim Keir
      Apr 19, 2020 @ 15:58:43

      Hi Taylor!

      I agree, we need to keep mental health as closely connected to scientifically-proven best practices as much as we can. The fear that empirical approaches are not amenable to complex emotions and lead to robotic treatment are of course silly, but are created from those who do not have enough experience with the theory to understand. Proper education should absolutely put a dent in the proliferation of myths from both peers and clients.

      I like to think it should go both ways, and that CBT should have a functional comprehension of a myriad of other psychological theories, much like what we’ve experienced in this program. Broad familiarity of the many theories out there is one of the only ways to counteract misconceptions and stereotypes of other members of our field. The more we understand each other, the better we can promote each other for our respective strengths.

      Reply

  8. Jenna Nikolopoulos
    Apr 14, 2020 @ 17:23:34

    1. Myths can have such negative effects on the mental health field and quality of care provided to clients. One negative effect is that these myths can maintain the stigma that therapy has. If clients believe these untrue myths of CBT, then they will be less likely to reach out for help and try to resolve their problems through other means that may not be helpful at all, which can impact their problems more in the long-run. Additionally, these myths could cause potential clients that would benefit greatly from CBT to seek out other therapeutic styles that wouldn’t help them as much, which could in the end do more harm than good because the client will realize the lack of progress they are making with these techniques, which could cause them to stop therapy. Lastly, these myths could change someone’s mind about trying therapy altogether as they may generalize these myths to other styles thinking that all therapy works in the same way, which can negatively impact their problems long-term if they try fixing their problems on their own instead of seeking out help that engages in evidence-based practices.

    2. One thing I could do to help dispel these myths is by educating other therapists and clients about what CBT truly entails to show how effective these evidence-based practices really are in clients long-term. Another thing I could do to educate my colleagues is by participating in trainings with them. Lastly, I can also demonstrate the effectiveness of CBT by having others observe my therapy sessions, which would help dispel myths as I would be “showing” how effective CBT is instead “telling”.

    Reply

    • Madison Armstrong
      Apr 18, 2020 @ 18:20:13

      Hi Jenna,

      I agree with you that these myths can have a stigma on therapy. Clients who hear these myths and do not know much about therapy will likely generalize them to all therapeutic styles. Many people do not know that there are different approaches to therapy and if they hear this about CBT, they may not try other forms of therapy. This would be a great disservice to potential clients because they would not seek out professional help when they need it. I think that it is a really good idea to demonstrate CBT therapy sessions as a way of educating people. This would even work in a role play situation to show the different stages of treatment and techniques involved with CBT.

      Reply

  9. Mariah Fraser
    Apr 14, 2020 @ 21:50:44

    1. If there is false information being relayed to other professionals, there may not be an opportunity for them to learn how to be more effective in their own therapy sessions. Not only do those myths make CBT look bad, but it also makes CBT therapists look bad as well. It paints them to be therapists who don’t care to build a relationship with their client, they are rigid, cold and mechanical, they disregard the role of emotions, etc. All of these views are not appealing to people seeking help. So instead of receiving empirically-based, effective treatment that aims to help instill independence as soon as possible, clients may be receiving treatment that produces little progress due to ineffective approaches (lack of goals and treatment plan), that leaves them in therapy for months and months and months. That does not help to increase the quality of care for clients.

    2. As well-trained CBT therapists in the field, it is our duty to address these myths as a way to reduce ignorance and increase the quality of care for clients, as mentioned above. Addressing and correcting false information helps to accurately represent how other mental health professionals and clients view CBT.

    Reply

    • Shelby Piekarczyk
      Apr 15, 2020 @ 13:11:01

      Hi Mariah,

      I agree completely that these myths can have a negative effect on the practice of CBT and on CBT therapists. CBT therapists (a myth I have heard) are viewed as ‘harsh’ and ‘cold’ not caring to develop a therapeutic relationship. Because of this clients may steer away from CBT, an effective treatment and end up having ineffective therapy. This ultimately will not help the client and will not relieve them of their symptoms, or teach them tools on how to adaptively cope in stressful situations. This in turn, will put a bad name on the mental health field because it shows that clients do not get better after therapy and that they still have their symptoms after multiple therapy sessions. Great job!

      Reply

    • Jenna Nikolopoulos
      Apr 15, 2020 @ 19:32:06

      Hi Mariah! I completely agree with what you said regarding how these myths can negatively affect the mental health field. As you said, these myths paints CBT therapists in a negative light and make CBT treatment seem ineffective. If CBT therapists were truly rigid, cold, and mechanical, clients wouldn’t be making a lot of progress because we would have such poor therapeutic relationships with them, but that’s not the case. Yes, CBT is a bit more structured, but clients greatly benefit from CBT practices because they start with a good foundation (i.e. good therapeutic relationship), which shows that CBT therapists don’t disregard the role of emotions. However, if people believe what these myths, then, like you said, they’ll seek treatment elsewhere that won’t be as effective where clients make little to no progress.

      Reply

    • Erin Wilbur
      Apr 20, 2020 @ 07:55:45

      Hi Mariah,
      I agree completely that we need to address these myths to reduce the ignorance about CBT that pushes away other mental health professionals as well as clients. We can’t expect good treatment outcomes in therapy that isn’t evidence-based, and you’re correct in saying that our shortened approach to therapy turns off potential clients who have only thought of therapy as something that they’ll be in for the rest of their lives. I think promoting the concept that we want our clients to learn to be independent and “be their own therapists” would be effective in dispelling these myths about CBT.

      Reply

  10. Shelby Piekarczyk
    Apr 15, 2020 @ 13:03:48

    1. There are a multitude of negative effects these myths can have on the mental health field and the quality of care provided to clients. This can first include future therapists to not want to learn CBT and become a CBT therapist. CBT has an abundance of empirical research backing this form of therapy, proving that it is an effective form of treatment. So, instead of practicing CBT, a therapy that evidence has proven its effectiveness, future therapists may decide to learn and study a different approach. This can lead to therapists using approaches that have no empirical research of success but have been proven to be ineffective. Because of this, clients can have poor treatment outcomes because they are not involved in effective therapy. This will harm the mental health field because client’s symptoms will not improve and can lead to being involved in therapy for a long duration. The mental health field is already greatly stigmatized, if we as therapists provide poor treatment this stigma will continue.

    2. The way that we are professionals can dispel some of these myths are by speaking intelligently about CBT and the research that backs it. By providing individuals with evidence that backs CBT and proves it is an effective treatment will ultimately help to diminish current myths. Additionally, within the therapeutic relationship we can discuss with our clients these myths and show the facts against the myths that are making our clients cautious of beginning CBT. By doing this it will hopefully put our clients at ease and ultimately believe in the CBT approach.

    Reply

    • Jenna Nikolopoulos
      Apr 15, 2020 @ 19:45:21

      Hi Shelby! I love what you said about the negative effects these myths can have on the mental health field and the quality of care provided to clients. These myths can definitely prevent people from pursuing a career as a CBT therapist, which only perpetuates these myths further even though there is so much empirical evidence that proves the effectiveness of CBT. As you said, this will only harm future clients because these future therapists will be learning ineffective therapeutic approaches that won’t benefit the client as much as it could if it were an empirically based approach. Therapists should be trying to help their clients improve their symptoms in the best possible way without prolonging therapy for more than is needed. Ineffective approaches, like you said, will cause people to be in therapy for a longer duration and if this is the case, clients are going to lose hope and motivation for change if they aren’t seeing results. The goal is to try and break the stigma around therapy so people feel more comfortable reaching out for help when they need it. But if these myths continue, so will the stigma.

      Reply

    • Ashley Foster
      Apr 15, 2020 @ 21:32:43

      Hi Shelby! I like the point you made about how the effects of these myths can hurt the field with future clinicians and professionals. When making a decision of what area of counseling approach you are going to practice, individuals gather information before making their decisions. With these myths and false information on what CBT practices actually involve, individuals may decide to shy away and look at other theological approaches. I think this is important as there is such a need for good therapist already. Great job with the post!

      Reply

    • Erin Wilbur
      Apr 20, 2020 @ 07:51:51

      Hi Shelby,
      You’re definitely right about these myths causing further stigma for the mental health field. I’ve heard myths that CBT therapists don’t “care” as much as others because it is meant to be time-limited, and we don’t want clients to be in therapy for years if we can help them in a small number of sessions. When myths like this are believed, people are pushed to pursue other types of treatment, even when they may not have empirical support like CBT, which can be dangerous for clients. We want the best for our clients, and having them in treatment that doesn’t improve their symptoms won’t help the stigma the mental health field already faces.

      Reply

  11. Ashley Foster
    Apr 15, 2020 @ 21:27:37

    1. For a client these myths can bring a negative stigma to coming into therapy. First off, these negative myths make the clients lose trust. If a client hears that CBT therapist are cold hearted short and do not go into certain areas, without the right explanation, clients may not turn to CBT for their first choice of treatment. This puts a black mark on therapists who are practicing CBT and are unable to give psychoeducation on what we are actually doing and the purpose of why we hold certain standards. Without this explanation, quiet are only left with the knowledge of these myths and their negative effects on CBT. In other negative in fact of these myths, is that clients or potential clients may hear these and believe them to be true and not only CBT, but other areas of therapy also known as overgeneralization. Going off of what I said before with the trust issues, potential clients may read into what they’ve heard about CBT and turn away from therapy completely as a treatment option. This can be detrimental to our potential clients or clients that are certified into therapy as we need to build that trust even more so than we would have before this myth came about.

    2. One way that we can help dispel some of these myths, as we can practice what we preach. Making sure that we focus on the structure of CBT within our sessions and practicing beneficial treatment. With doing so, we will build raptor with our clients, show them that these myths are not true, and as a result these clients will pass on this knowledge to others they know. another way we can help in dispelling these myths, as we can give proper education and psychoeducation on how CBT base session should be run and the practices that go along with it. This gives the client explanation for why we do what we do and the importance of the manner in which we do complete them.

    Reply

    • Madison Armstrong
      Apr 18, 2020 @ 18:04:37

      Hi Ashley,

      I agree with you that a client might lose trust with therapy upon hearing a CBT myth. I think these myths can put a negative connotation on CBT and even be overgeneralized to other forms of therapy as well. This is why you are right in saying we should practice what we preach. Psychoeducation and positive results from treatment will help to dispel some of these myths. Providing the client with psychoeducation is important for them to understand the theory behind CBT and why we use certain techniques in session. This can also show them the flexibility in CBT as we individualize the treatment to their needs.

      Reply

  12. Madison Armstrong
    Apr 18, 2020 @ 17:57:35

    (1) What negative effects can such myths have on the mental health field and quality of care provided to clients?

    These myths can have negative effects on the mental health field and quality of care provided to clients. Client’s can come into treatment with only knowledge of myths about CBT and may feel less motivated to participate in treatment. They may also search different treatment approaches not knowing that CBT is empirically supported. Clients should receive treatment approaches that are evidence based and if a client is against CBT then they may be receiving treatment that will not lead to lasting changes and may not have the scientific support that CBT does. Other professional’s having these beliefs about CBT can also cause some negative effects. Professional’s that believe in these myths may be less likely to refer a client to someone who practices CBT because they are not educated on CBT. Other professionals also may claim they know CBT when they do not because of the myth that it is easy to learn.

    (2) What can you do to help dispel some of these myths?

    To dispel some of these myths it is important to provide the client with psychoeducation and go over the cognitive-behavioral model with the client in the beginning stages of treatment. Psychoeducation will help clients see the theory behind CBT and why we practice certain techniques and what their treatment goals are and why. Another way to dispel some of these myths is providing people with more knowledge about CBT in the professional community. Offering other professionals in the same practice as you information about CBT is one way that you could do this.

    Reply

    • Tim Keir
      Apr 19, 2020 @ 16:05:43

      Hey Madison,

      It is interesting that such biases could be present against CBT, since so many different theoretical approaches have been adapting CBT strategies over the years. Yet I absolutely agree that myths held by other practitioners could prevent individuals from finding a CBT counselor despite the possible efficacy it could have for their case. I think you raise an interesting point that a professional could believe the myths enough that they pretend to offer CBT but instead offer only a pale substitute. What a horrible possibility!

      I agree that psychoeducation is our best friend in helping to dispel mistaken ideas about CBT in a client. It is unfortunate that such myths may make our attempts at psychoeducation harder. The more knowledgeable we are of the myths floating around CBT, skill.

      Reply

      • Tim Keir
        Apr 19, 2020 @ 16:06:48

        *The more knowledgeable we are of the myths floating around CBT, the better equipped we shall be to refute them when our clients inevitably bring them up to challenge our mastery.

        Sorry, the last sentence got cut off there somehow.

        Reply

  13. Tim Keir
    Apr 19, 2020 @ 15:42:06

    What negative effects can such myths have on the mental health field and quality of care provided to clients?

    Pervasive myths on the efficacy and nature of CBT make properly teaching it to potential clients that much more daunting. It is far easier to learn a new concept than it is to revise an old misconception. It is fortunate that CBT is designed specifically to help clients explore and adapt their old beliefs into more realistic ones, but having a client with a negative view of the process coming in definitely makes the psychoeducation that much more difficult.
    These sorts of myths could be held not only by clients but by other members of the mental health field who work on different theoretical frameworks. I’m not saying that every clinician should be completely familiar with every theory, but it is important that different mental health practitioners at least support other members of their field regardless of style. A psycho-dynamically-inclined counselor may spread old ideas about the robotic nature of CBT, which can lead several outcomes if the client changes to one with a CBT approach. Either the client discovers that CBT is wholly different, and thus doubts all of the insight gained with their former counselor (throwing the baby out with the bathwater as it were), or the client remains skeptical and opposed to the CBT treatment, delaying progress based on their negative expectations. Thus, it benefits all counselors and clients to spread accurate information about the work they and others do, and as a whole promote the field of psychology.

    What can you do to help dispel some of these myths?

    I feel like having a presence on the internet and social media in particular is an important avenue in the pervasive spread of accurate information. While the most logical voices don’t tend to be the loudest, having a variety of media which present basic CBT principles in an approachable and inclusive manner could hopefully change the online discourse from what it currently is. Not two minutes into searching CBT on google, you can find reddit and facebook threads about people discussing the very myths we have been talking about and receiving a large audience and confirmation from others. While actively disputing such claims may not be the most worthwhile endeavor, providing resources and information that is seen before such discussions appear could be beneficial in stemming the tide of coloring people’s first impressions of CBT. Perhaps a youtube series that answers such questions, or an AMA interview with an LMHC would be helpful in dispelling myths and spreading accurate information.

    Reply

    • Robert Salvucci
      Apr 20, 2020 @ 16:59:40

      Hey Tim!

      I agree that it’s very important for mental health professionals to provide mutual support to one another. This can help keep the spirit of a more objective curiosity based on scientific discovery and collaboration rather than orientation vs orientation. I hadn’t thought about the potential confusion that myths can create for clients who have tried different approaches to psychotherapy. I also agree that social media presence is very important. The more qualified voices presenting information the better!

      Reply

  14. Erin Wilbur
    Apr 20, 2020 @ 07:47:04

    (1) What negative effects can such myths have on the mental health field and quality of care provided to clients? (2) What can you do to help dispel some of these myths?

    1. These myths can have negative effects on the field as a whole as well as the quality of care our clients receive because other professionals who believe these myths make it difficult to disprove them. Some agencies may function using other types of therapy, even techniques that are not evidence-based, because they believe these myths about CBT. Due to this, they may not be willing to refer to clients to CBT-based therapy, which means the client suffers because they are not receiving the help they need. It also makes therapy much more difficult if the client has heard these myths about CBT and doesn’t think it will work. They may not be willing to participate, or will think the therapist isn’t a serious mental health professional, which impacts their treatment. It also makes the mental health field as a whole look unprofessional if myths about a certain treatment are widely believed, because it supports the theory that CBT is easy to practice and makes it seem like it isn’t a serious, evidence-based treatment.
    2. To dispel some of these myths, we can first educate our colleagues and be a model of productive CBT, showing other professionals that this method is a serious, evidence-based treatment. We should also do our part to dispute these myths when we hear them, and provide evidence to support the use of CBT in the mental health field. It is also helpful to educate colleagues through participating in trainings and discussing the science behind CBT. Finally, we can also allow other mental health professionals to observe our sessions to see that CBT is an effective treatment that can and should be used with a variety of clients.

    Reply

  15. Robert Salvucci
    Apr 20, 2020 @ 16:53:15

    Hey Erin!

    Good point with clients potentially being skeptical coming in, unfounded myths floating around regarding therapy can make individuals who are already hesitant about therapy lack confidence or even avoid treatment. It’s also the case that the more myths that are being pedaled around CBT and other evidence- based practices, the less legitimate psychology begins to look as a field. Trainings and discussions with other colleagues can help keep us and them informed about CBT and other relevant issues.

    Reply

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Adam M. Volungis, PhD, LMHC

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