Introduction: Say a Little about Yourself! {by 1/14}

Yes, it’s this again!  For most of you this is your second semester of graduate classes and it’s online (again).  Let’s continue to get to know each other.  Please answer the following about yourself (some same, some different): (1) Name?  (2) What college/university did you graduate from?  (3) What has been your most adaptive coping skill during the pandemic?  (4) What was your biggest take-away from your first semester of graduate classes? (5) What are your initial thoughts (or experience) about cognitive-behavioral therapy?!?

 

Your original post should be posted by 1/14.  Post your two replies no later than 1/16.  *Please remember to click the “reply” button when posting a reply.  This makes it easier for the reader to follow the blog postings.

 

*Strong suggestion: Write all your blogs on a separate document.  Then, copy and paste it.  This will make your life easier and less stressful in case something “wacky” happens with technology.

 

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79 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Alexa Berry
    Jan 08, 2021 @ 16:16:49

    Hi everyone,

    I’m Alexa and I graduated from Assumption (College). During the pandemic I have tried to focus on positive psychology and mindfulness tasks like acts of kindness, gratitude, and meditation/breathing exercises. I found these to generally be adaptive coping skills, although I’m still working on mastering the meditation and breathing exercises. Another adaptive coping strategy I’ve used is to take “stress breaks” to focus on things I’m interested in, like reading a book or watching a show I like. If anyone is looking for a good book to read, let me know because I’ve gone through many during the pandemic.

    My biggest take away from my first semester of grad school is it is a lot more work than undergrad was, even though this was expected. Having classes over zoom and doing group work/ exams/ assignments etc. remotely was a big challenge, and it made me appreciate in person learning a lot more. My initial thoughts about CBT are that I like it compared to other methods used in counseling. During my clinical psychology capstone seminar we went through a lot of different approaches, and even then CBT stood out to me. I’m looking forward to learning more about integrating the skills we learned last semester into a CBT framework.

    Reply

    • bibi
      Jan 08, 2021 @ 20:18:02

      Hey girl! I know you said you were looking for book suggestions! I just finished Witch Hunter by Max Seeck and Labyrinth by Catherine Coulter! Both awesome mystery books where you really can’t tell the pot until the very end! Check them out!

      Reply

      • Alexa Berry
        Jan 11, 2021 @ 12:03:11

        I will definitely check those out! If you’re into mystery/suspenseful books I recommend the wife between us by Greer Hendricks (one of the best books I’ve ever read) it has similarities to books like Girl on a Train and Gone Girl

        Reply

    • Beth Martin
      Jan 09, 2021 @ 17:52:05

      Hey Alexa!

      Mindfulness and breathing exercises are massively helpful, but I know some people (myself included!) struggle with shutting off enough to benefit from them/do it properly. Do you have any tips on how you got breathing exercises etc. to work for you?
      I’m also trying to read more, so I’d love some recommendations if you have them! What kind of things are you reading? Like Bibi, I’ve read some great books recently if you’d like their titles too!

      Reply

      • Alexa Berry
        Jan 11, 2021 @ 12:08:42

        Hi! I definitely struggle with the shutting my mind off part. Something that has helped me with the breathing exercises is either using a visual for how long I should inhale/exhale/ hold breaths. I also watched a lot of videos on diaphragmatic breathing. I would love if you would share some book titles with me! Some of my all time favorites are We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, and A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (or generally anything from Reese’s Book Club).

        Reply

    • Brianna Walls
      Jan 12, 2021 @ 15:51:59

      Hi Alexa! I agree with you, online learning has definitely made me appreciate in-person learning a lot more! I miss having in-person interactions with my classmates and classmates. In addition, I also agree with you, group work online is extremely difficult! It is definitely something I still need to get used to.

      Reply

    • Carly Moris
      Jan 16, 2021 @ 19:37:39

      Hey Alexa!

      I agree with you taking stress breaks is super important! I know i try to take at least an hour or two every night before bed to read or watch tv to help me relax. I was also wondering what your favorite genre or book is? My favorite genre is fantasy. If you are looking for something new to read i just finished reading the Codex Alera series by Jim Butcher and i would definitely recommend it!

      Reply

    • Anne Marie Marie Lemieux
      Jan 17, 2021 @ 16:21:25

      Hi Alexa, I have also been working to practice daily gratitude but after 10 months of this, trying to find the positive on the daily can sometimes be challenging. I think it’s great that you are starting to practice meditation. I use the app Insight Timer. It has some amazing guided meditations. Thank you for sharing about yourself. I’m looking forward to this semester too.

      Reply

  2. Bibi
    Jan 08, 2021 @ 20:16:04

    Hi! I’m Bibi. I graduated from Trinity University in San Antonio, Tx (p.s. I still am living in texas while classes are all online). I think my most adaptive coping skill during quarantine is art! I had originally planned on majoring in art and college and loved the ability to get back into it. Also started my own etsy shop to sell my art during the quarantine (shameless plug).
    Something I learned last semester was that taking a break during class is huge to be able to pay attention during online classes! I have a hard time sitting in the online classes for so long so I definitely appreciated it when the professors understood that and gave us a break half way through class! I really like CBT. We learned about a bunch of different branches of therapy in undergrad and I have been practicing ABA therapy since graduation. I have found that the practices and principles of CBT are some of the most practical to me and I really like the skills that are taught through CBT.

    Reply

    • Beth Martin
      Jan 09, 2021 @ 17:54:33

      Hey Bibi,

      Congrats on starting your Etsy shop! I loved those little Christmas gnomes you made last year, so I’m sure your stuff is going to be super cute – I hope it’s all going well! Going back to an old hobby that brought you joy sounds like it’s been great for you through all of this.

      I’ve always been interested in ABA, how are you finding it to use as a practitioner at work?

      Beth

      Reply

    • Alexa Berry
      Jan 11, 2021 @ 12:16:23

      Hi Bibi,

      I always wondered what the time difference was like for those of you in Texas (I think there’s a few). My grandparents live in Arizona and sometimes they’re 3 hours behind and sometimes 2, depending on the time of year. I agree about the breaks during class, that was something I really looked forward to during class time. I was also in ABA for 2 years (up until this week when I retired that part of my career). It’s so interesting how a lot of these principles can be seen across disciplines. I hope to use some of the skills I’ve learned as an RBT in working with children and families. Drop your etsy store name, I’ll check it out!!

      Reply

    • Christina DeMalia
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 11:59:14

      Hi Bibi,

      I definitely noticed the same thing with having difficulty paying attention during online classes. I used to be able to sit in 7 hours of back to back classes with very few breaks in my undergrad, but something about not being in person and having to stare at a computer screen makes it difficult to stay focused. I can’t wait till classes can be in person again, although I do feel bad you’ll have to leave Texas to come deal with MA winters.

      Reply

    • Althea Hermitt- Mcpherson
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 18:09:02

      Hi Bibi, I absolutely love that you are an artist, I can’t draw or anything but I’m a lover of art. It’s really nice that you have been able to get back into art and have been fortunate to own your own business. A direct link to that Etsy shop would have been great. I love to see when people are able to blossom and bloom in what could have been considered a trying time for many. Online class has its perks but I’m looking forward to regular classes. I do agree with you that a break is absolutely important. It sounds like you have high praise for CBT, I’m really looking forward to learning the skills.

      Reply

  3. Beth Martin
    Jan 09, 2021 @ 17:49:46

    Hi all! I’m Beth, and I graduated from Arizona State last summer. I think my most adaptive coping skill during quarantine has been learning to take stock of how I’m actually feeling, and working a plan of action for tackling it into my day-to-day life. I used to be very good at sticking my head in the sand for minor things, but these have naturally been magnified during the lockdowns etc., and I’ve been able to actually assess what’s going on with myself. Instead of just dealing with an issue when it crops up, I’ve been taking steps to keep myself busy and feeling accomplished too, so DIY (we moved into a really old house, it’s been a learning curve for sure) has been great at keeping me sane.

    I think my biggest takeaway from the first semester online is that I don’t hate group work as much as I did in undergrad – which used to genuinely chill me to the bone when I read a syllabus – and that I can adapt pretty well during it. I was also pretty scared I wouldn’t retain as much information as I’d hoped, but I think I’ve remembered a fair bit.

    Regarding CBT, I’ve got nothing but positive things to say about it! I used to work with individuals who were referred to my organization by a special victims unit, and a lot of them engaged in CBT to help with their trauma. I got to see first hand, over a series of weeks, the changes that it made in how they tackled things and their overall affect. Every single one of my clients who had been in therapy previously and hated it said it was a positive experience where they felt like they were actively involved in their healing. I like that CBT has that “homework” aspect to it, allowing a client to feel like they’re participating, not having therapy done to them.

    Reply

    • Nicole Giannetto
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 13:28:06

      Hi Beth! I am happy to hear that group projects have been a positive experience for you (I really enjoyed being able to work on our clinical role play project together!). I also think it’s so great that you have been able to get first-hand experience with CBT through your work. I look forward to working with you in this class!

      Reply

  4. Maya Lopez
    Jan 10, 2021 @ 10:25:05

    Hi! I’m Maya and I graduated from Umass Amherst. I’d say my most adaptive coping skill during the pandemic has been getting really into cooking and baking especially since we can’t go out to eat anymore. I love to watch cooking or baking shows and try to gain inspiration from them. The biggest takeaway from my first semester of graduate school would be that there are not much homework assignments to be graded on, we mostly are just graded on exams and that can be tricky sometimes! My initial thoughts about CBT are that it is very goal-based and aims to change maladaptive thought patterns in individuals with the goal their behaviors will become more adaptive, it also seems to be a very popular theoretical approach in our field.

    Reply

    • Alexa Berry
      Jan 11, 2021 @ 12:12:00

      Hi Maya,

      What baking/cooking shows do you like? I always find myself watching Diners, Drive Ins, and Dives (who doesn’t love Guy Fieri). I’ve also gotten sucked into food Tik Tok. I would love if you would share some of your favorite recipes from quarantine!

      Reply

      • Maya Lopez
        Jan 11, 2021 @ 13:24:27

        Hey Alexa!

        On Netflix I like Zumbo’s Just Desserts (he’s a famous Australian pastry chef), Sugar Rush (they also have a Christmas edition), Crazy Delicious is so funky and different! As for cooking shows, Final Table was really good, and Chef’s table is also interesting but more of a documentary on different amazing chefs and their restaurants. Plus Master Chef and Hells Kitchen on TV are also great! So far I have challenged myself to make a cinnamon butter cake with chocolate espresso ganache, and a Frangelico buttercream in the shape of a covid virus and I decorated it for Christmas like a tree and put little fondant presents around it haha. By far the most challenging thing I’ve made but it was perfect for Christmas eve! I’ve also made cinnamon donuts but I’m planning on trying to make bagels with homemade jam and butter soon. I also experimented with making my own pasta and sauce. What do you like to make? 🙂 and do you prefer cooking or baking?

        Reply

        • Alexa Berry
          Jan 14, 2021 @ 15:53:06

          I don’t think I’ve ever seen Zumbo’s just desserts, I’ll have to check it out. I do love Sugar Rush Christmas!!! Hell’s Kitchen is a classic & I really like kitchen nightmares with Gordon Ramsey too. It sounds like you made a lot of really cool dishes, I don’t know if i would have the patience for that. Let me know how the bagels go, I love bagels! Personally I prefer baking, which turns into me making the desserts for every family event ever. My family has decided my “signature dessert” is s’mores bars. Very boring, but apparently a classic.

          Reply

  5. Abby Robinson
    Jan 10, 2021 @ 12:41:38

    Hi everyone!
    My name is Abby; I graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 2017. This is my second semester in grad school. A big coping skill I adapted during the pandemic is small home projects. I’ve enjoyed redecorating and reorganizing many different areas of the house, which has been a good outlet to keep my mind and body busy. I’ve re-painted many rooms and organized the clutter around the house ☺ My biggest takeaway from my first semester of grad school is it is a great idea to stay on top of all the readings and assignments. In my undergrad I would sometimes procrastinate with work but I’ve realized to produce quality material, I need to stay organized in each class and not wait to complete assignments. This has helped me prioritize tasks that I need to accomplish with schoolwork as well as daily life.

    My initial thoughts about CBT are that it’s widely used in many therapeutic or counseling programs. It has an approachable structure about it that seems to be successful for many people and also works with many different scenarios. I’m excited to be able to integrate learned CBT skills from this class into my future counseling practices!

    Reply

    • Maya Lopez
      Jan 11, 2021 @ 13:36:44

      Hi Abby,

      That’s awesome you have gotten into organization in your home and academic life. It certainly does make a difference when you have a clean room to work in. I also painted my room yellow at the beginning of the quarantine. What rooms have you painted? I also agree with what you said about staying on top of the readings. It can be hard to read so much for all the classes but it does pile up fast if I don’t stay on top of it. I made a chart/spreadsheet for this coming semester in the hopes it will keep me on track for the readings and assignments. I wish you the best of luck this semester! What are you looking forward to most in this class?

      Reply

      • Abby Robinson
        Jan 13, 2021 @ 23:32:57

        Hi Maya! So far I’ve re-painted my living room and the spare room/office! It was super fun picking out colors and using my Pinterest boards to help get some inspiration!
        I’m looking forward to this class! I think the first thing I’d like to focus on is what the foundations of CBT are and how they can be integrated in therapy sessions with clients! I’ve always had some idea of CBT in my mind from undergrad classes and I hear it many times a day with class and readings, but I’m hoping to get a solid foundation of what CBT entails!
        See you in class 🙂

        Reply

    • Michelle McClure
      Jan 12, 2021 @ 15:03:57

      Hi Abby,
      That’s awesome that you have focused this time on making your space more comfortable for you. I am the strangest when it comes to organization myself, I can do it and I can do it well but then it always seems to undo itself and then I have to find a new system and try again, lol. I have been trying to be better at throwing things away, maybe that should be my new years resolution, to organize and de clutter my home. If I have any time between work and school that is, lol. I hope you have a great semester, stay safe and well.

      Reply

    • Lilly Brochu
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 08:52:57

      Hi Abby!

      I totally forgot about how much reorganizing and cleaning I have been doing since the pandemic! Even before the pandemic, cleaning is a coping skill for me (not really sure why, haha), but a lot of my time was spent donating clothes or other things I just did not need anymore. It must have felt good to get home projects done that may have been put off for a while. 😊 Also, I agree that it is important to get readings and assignments done in a timely manner because it can pile up extremely quickly in graduate school. One of the best ways that I have found to stay organized, is to compile all the assignments, readings, due dates, etc. and write them down into a planner. It helps to see an overview of the semester and helps you stay on task. Good luck this semester!!

      Reply

  6. Elizabeth Baker
    Jan 11, 2021 @ 00:54:44

    Hello everyone!
    My name is Elizabeth Baker, and this is my second semester of graduate school. For my undergraduate studies, I graduated from UMASS Lowell with a major in Psychology and a minor in Developmental Disabilities. My last semester as an undergraduate senior up until now has definitely been a difficult academic experience with shifting online; staying motivated and interested has been extremely difficult thus far. I have not been doing much besides continuing to write fictional stories and tapping into my creative side (drawing and singing). With school, I try to practice my therapy skills with classmates and watch related videos to keep me motivated and inspired.

    My biggest take-away from last semester was understanding the difference between what professors in graduate school expect from me and what undergraduate professors expected from me. By that I mean, I finally started to understand the expectations and flow of completing high-quality assignments. I was able to raise my grades and complete assignments more confidently, now that I understand what my professors wanted!

    Lastly, I think CBT is very important in the field of behavior analysis. I feel that analyzing behavior on a cognitive level is the foundation of understanding why negative and positive behavior patterns have developed. Searching deep within life experiences and trying to understand why individuals have developed their behavior patterns feels like a vulnerable and emotional process, and can be extremely beneficial when skills are used effectively and efficiently. I do not have professional experience using CBT, other than practicing the skills we have learned so far with classmates. I am excited to continue learning CBT and executing my skills; that said, I excited to see what this semester has to offer!

    Reply

    • Cassie Miller
      Jan 12, 2021 @ 13:09:44

      Hi Elizabeth!

      I really connect with what you said about figuring out the difference between undergraduate school and graduate school. It was very overwhelming during the first semester as we did not know what was expected quite yet, especially on an online platform. However, I feel much more relieved after getting one semester of graduate school under my belt, since the expectation has been set. I also would have to say that these high-quality assignments that you mentioned feel more interesting because they are relevant to something we are both passionate about now that we have identified a significant interest for clinical counseling.

      As you mentioned, behavior analysis and CBT really do overlap significantly. CBT focuses on exploring these positive/negative thought and behavior patterns that influence how an individual reacts to certain environmental situations. Behavior analysis looks at environmental antecedents, behaviors, and consequences to see what may be provoking the behavior, as well as influencing the continuation of it. I also look forward to learning more about CBT as we advance through the semester!

      Reply

    • Zoe DiPinto
      Jan 12, 2021 @ 15:20:34

      Hi Elizabeth!

      It is so cool that you were able to minor in something so specific like developmental disabilities. That must have been a very interesting and informative experience that gave you an idea of what setting/ population you’d like to work with in the future! I can sympathize with the crazy transition to graduate school during the pandemic. I also feel like I’m still recovering from the shock of finishing undergrad online in a very anti-climactic way.
      I had a minor in creative writing so I’ve also been writing fictional stories! I mainly focus on playwriting, but lately I’ve been attempting prose. I think it’s very helpful to be able to create during this time. Good for the brain and soul! I hope writing and music is fulfilling for you too.

      Reply

      • Elizabeth Baker
        Jan 16, 2021 @ 16:36:48

        Hello Zoe!

        Minoring in developmental disabilities has definitely introduced me to many of my favorite courses in psychology (e.g., Disabilities in Literature, Sociology of Disabilities, etc.). I was also able to volunteer at a middle school and observe in classes that were integrated (with neurotypical and students with cognitive or physical disabilities) as well as LEAP classes (that were specifically for students with cognitive disabilities), and that was such an eye-opening and heartwarming experience. I can truthfully say that the experience helped me understand that I want to work with children/adolescents, and I wish I could go back and volunteer!

        Reply

    • Abby Robinson
      Jan 13, 2021 @ 23:38:45

      Hi Elizabeth!
      I relate so much to what you mentioned about you having a better understanding of class assignments and producing work more confidently now that we’re in graduate school. I totally agree that in graduate school the expectations are more clear and we are able to produce quality work that actually furthers our knowledge and experiences, rather than just going through all the assignments just to get a grade like it was in undergrad. I feel that the assignments are helping me understand the content deeper and I can see myself using that knowledge during real life therapy/counseling situations.
      See you in class!

      Reply

  7. Zoe DiPinto
    Jan 11, 2021 @ 15:33:52

    1. Zoe DiPinto
    2. Clark University (2020)
    3. My most adaptive coping skill during the pandemic has been yoga! I’m a dancer and dance instructor so it’s been difficult not to be able to take/teach classes. But I’ve found a youtube yoga community that is challenging and promotes mindfulness that has helped with big life transitions like graduating, starting grad school, and moving out while filling some exercise and expression holes left by the absence of dance.
    4/5. My biggest take-away from the first semester is that I am in the right place! After a long process of applying to research oriented programs, I’m very happy with my decision to attend a school that is focused on clinical work and CBT. I love learning about the theory of psychology, but I’ve been hesitant in my desire to work directly in a counseling setting. However, after taking classes last semester, my ~self-efficacy~ perception has increased and I’m gaining a big interest in CBT. I’m becoming increasingly interested in the treatment of anxiety, depression, PTSD, and insomnia in adults using CBT. I still do not have a lot of knowledge in what CBT looks like in a counseling session, but I’m looking forward to learning more.

    Reply

    • Cassie Miller
      Jan 12, 2021 @ 12:30:02

      Hi Zoe!

      I think it is so cool that you have been able to get yourself into yoga and have joined a YouTube yoga community. I would love to know what the name of the community is, since I have tried to get myself to do yoga but struggle to commit to it. I have heard it has really great effects on one’s mental health and wellness; there is also no better time to promote mindfulness and yoga than at a time where we are undergoing so many transitions (graduate school, adult life, a pandemic, etc).

      I am happy that you feel confident in your decision to attend this program. CBT is so beneficial and is a really useful tool for working with clients and trying to understand their beliefs and behavior patterns. I am looking forward to figuring out what demographic I want to work with as well, so it is nice to see that you were able to make progress in that area.

      Reply

      • Zoe DiPinto
        Jan 12, 2021 @ 15:12:24

        Hi Cassie! Thanks for your reply, it’s nice to know we are all in the same boat in figuring out what our futures will look like in the psychology world. I enjoyed reading your post about navigating negative patterns in your clinical job. I agree that this program has made me realize the importance of verbally identifying these patterns not only in your client, but WITH your client so they can grow in their “autonomy and confidence” as you put it!
        To answer your question, I highly recommend looking up “Yoga with Adrienne” on youtube! She is a really talented and quirky yoga instructor that has yoga videos anywhere from 10min to an hour that are very easy to follow along to. Right now, she is doing a “30-day yoga challenge” where she uploads a new video every day on January. Each one is about half an hour and its been a life-saver! I try to do it every morning before I shower and it really helps me feel good and mindful through my day. It also feels like I’m in a community because she has so many followers doing the same thing. I hope you try it and like it!

        Reply

    • Brianna Walls
      Jan 12, 2021 @ 15:48:22

      Hi Zoe! I have always wanted to try yoga, people say it is such a relaxing activity. I’m hesitant to try it though because I am not an athletic person nor do I know anything about yoga. Do you have any recommendations for a beginner?

      Reply

    • Cailee Norton
      Jan 13, 2021 @ 17:19:53

      Hey Zoe!

      I’m so glad you were able to find an online community to challenge you at home! I love that youtube has been able to be classroom for so many different types of at home exercises during this time! I have to agree with you that I’m glad to be in a program that is less research based and more focused on the clinical side of things. Like you I’m not very familiar with all things CBT but I’m confident this program and these courses we’ve got lined up will be able to prepare us to achieve our personal goals.

      Reply

    • Christina DeMalia
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 12:08:57

      Hi Zoe,

      I used to dance and loved it as well, but unfortunately I’ve never really been able to find classes for adults in my area, so a college dance class was the closest I’ve gotten in a while. I also turned to yoga as a way to fill that hole and still get exercise, and I love the way mindfulness is intertwined with the practice. I’m not sure which yoga community you have found on YouTube so far, but I am a huge fan of Yoga With Adriene. She is super knowledgeable, but also doesn’t take herself too seriously and loves making awkward jokes and including her dog Benji in the videos. She’s always putting out new videos and 30 day challenges so if you haven’t seen any of her videos yet I definitely recommend checking her out.

      Reply

  8. Cassie Miller
    Jan 11, 2021 @ 17:44:09

    Hi!

    My name is Cassie Miller. I graduated from Assumption College with a major in psychology and a double minor in philosophy and ABA. My most adaptive coping skill during this pandemic would have to be taking everything day by day. If I realized anything over quarantine it was that it is extremely difficult to plan for things during a pandemic. For this reason, I try not to overwhelm myself with the unpredictable nature of the future; I have found that staying in the moment and taking everything as it comes has been much more helpful. I also have become a little more tech savvy, which is really saying something for me!

    My biggest take away from my first semester of graduate classes would really have to center around client rapport. It is so important to look at every client in an individualized context and to make sure you adjust your approach to match their style. If the client does not feel comfortable or safe to share personal information with you, you can pretty much say goodbye to progress. It is also very important to frequently update client progress through continuous assessment in therapy. These things are so important because they determine whether a client will continue with their therapy, as well as how they respond to it. I find CBT to be very useful in this line of work because it really hones in on an individual’s negative thought patterns and how they may affect their actions/behaviors. It is so important to identify where an individual’s line of thinking stems from and how it effects their own view of themselves, as well as their perception of how others view them. This is also so beneficial when focusing on their learned patterns of negative behaviors. These unhelpful patterns must be realized before they can work on growing their own autonomy and confidence. I have found in my job that when I process certain negative behaviors with my students, it is so important for them to realize the root of why they participated in that given behavior. Once they can connect the antecedent to the actual behavior, they can develop coping skills that provide a much better response to similar internal/external triggers.

    Reply

    • Michelle McClure
      Jan 12, 2021 @ 15:10:48

      Hi Cassie! I have to say I completely agree with you, sometimes you just have to take life one day at a time. I know that they say that is a surviving mentality but I say what’s so wrong with that? As long as you have some long term goals in mind then taking things one day at a time or even some days just one hour at a time, it can really get you through some tough times in my experience. I personally have always struggled with mindfulness but I love a challenge and I keep trying and have for years and I get better at it little by little. I am always personally trying to become more self aware and I like to help my clients become more self aware as well. That is another reason I love CBT. I hope you have an awesome semester and stay safe and well.

      Reply

    • Tayler Weathers
      Jan 13, 2021 @ 14:20:32

      Hi Cassie! I think you’re right about planning during a pandemic – it’s been a truly eye-opening experience! I love the way you think about the future, I feel like we could all use a little more of that! I also think that client rapport is so crucial, and I found it so interesting last semester as well. I hope we all keep that in mind; I know for me it will be difficult not to get so swept up in the method that I forget the rapport!

      Reply

    • Pawel Zawistowski
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 18:51:54

      Hi Cassie!

      I agree with you that taking it day by day is a very good way of getting through this pandemic! It is easy to get disappointed when you try to plan things out but COVID guidelines get in the way. Also, I appreciate your insightful response about CBT and sharing your work experience. It is important to recognize the behavior as problematic or maladaptive before you can begin to develop treatment plans for the behavior.

      Reply

  9. Michelle McClure
    Jan 12, 2021 @ 14:58:20

    Hi Everyone! I am Michelle and I received my B.A in Fine Arts in Psychology from the University of Southern Maine. I started at Assumption University in the spring of 2020, so I got to experience a little of the normal campus routine before the epidemic hit. The epidemic has been very hard on me personally and I am really looking forward to a day when things become closer to normal and not so new normal. Before the pandemic I used to be a therapeutic mentor for south bay community services so I know the importance of self care and I do try to practice what I preach. Usually my self care involves reading, journaling, writing poetry, taking long hot bubble baths, and playing with my puppy. I recently started a new job as an intensive care coordinator at Community Health Link and I love that I am working in CBHI again. My new position is, well, intense at times and I am learning so much and I really feel that my classes at Assumption just help me even more to excel at work and vice versa. I really love CBT and I love being a clinician and working in this field.

    Reply

  10. Brianna Walls
    Jan 12, 2021 @ 15:44:09

    Hi! My name is Brianna Walls, I graduated from Worcester State University in the spring of 2020. Honestly, I don’t really have a coping skill to help me deal with the current pandemic. I’ve been trying to just stick to my normal routine as much as possible and I try not to watch the news because it tends to make me anxious. My biggest take-away from my first semester of grad school was to stay organized and DO NOT procrastinate because it will make the assignment even more stressful than it already is. I’ve had the opportunity to experience CBT from a client’s perspective, but I am eager to learn more about CBT from a therapist’s perspective. In addition, during my undergrad studies, my psychology classes only went over the basics of CBT. Therefore, I can’t wait to learn more about CBT and how it is used during a therapy session.

    Reply

    • Abby Robinson
      Jan 13, 2021 @ 23:48:41

      Hi Brianna,
      That’s interesting that you’ve been able to see CBT through the perspective as a client! I wonder if that will give you a well-rounded understanding of CBT as we learn more about CBT through the clinician’s point of view. Seeing both sides of it, I feel, will help you establish a solid relationship with clients.
      I also have been trying to stick to a regular routine to help keep some normalcy in my life! I actually wrote myself a schedule to help me stay on track and not get too off of my tasks and what I’m supposed to accomplished. It’s helped me keep up with a solid routine which makes me feel better about all the change that happened to abruptly.
      See you in class 🙂

      Reply

    • Lina Boothby-Zapata
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 20:09:19

      Hi Brianna,
      Just wondering how was your experience with CBT. I have been client for a while already in psychodynamic orientation. I guess, is more for individuals who really like to go deeper into history and relationships. Based on the videos that I have seen from Dr. V and others it looks like CBT focus on the problem that the client brings in to therapy, while Psychodynamics has goals that you can spend years on therapy. How was for you?

      Reply

  11. Althea Hermitt- Mcpherson
    Jan 13, 2021 @ 01:59:32

    Hi everyone, my name is Althea Hermitt-Mcpherson. I graduated from the University of the West Indies-Mona Campus in Kingston Jamaica. I must say that I have neglected adaptive coping skills for some maladaptive coping skills such as eating. However my treadmill gets delivered tomorrow and I will be exercising, a more adaptive coping skill. Having never been to school in the United States, being accustomed to the European style of teaching, and being out of school for quite some time, I was really uncertain about doing this program. However, the biggest takeaway from my first semester of graduate school was that I got this. I have no experience with CBT as the facility I currently work for utilizes ABA therapy however I know that ABA focuses on more immediate and specific issues while it is said that CBT utilizes a more comprehensive approach that is focused on long-term growth. I am looking forward to learning CBT as previous professors mentioned that CBT is the gold standard of psychotherapy. That has piqued my interest and I’m looking forward to being skillful in this form of therapy.

    Reply

    • Tayler Weathers
      Jan 13, 2021 @ 14:17:58

      Hi Althea! That is so interesting to compare the American style of teaching to the European style. I would love to know more about that! I also have a feeling that ABA will translate a bit more than you think for CBT (at least, that’s what I’ve heard!) so I feel like it’ll be interesting to get your perspective in class!

      Reply

  12. Yen Pham
    Jan 13, 2021 @ 12:23:31

    Hell everyone,
    My name is Yen Pham, a member of class 2020. I graduate from Assumption University. My most adaptive coping skill during the pandemic that is I like to walk, to meditate and to practice yoga. These habits help me to have a balance life. My biggest take-away from my first semester of graduate classes was my in person class rather than the remote class as we have now. I have limited in technology so it took time for me to learn it. My initial thoughts (or experience) about cognitive-behavioral therapy are. The CBT is a form of psychotherapy that focuses on how a person’s thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes affect their feelings and behaviors. CBT, this hands-on approach lends its practice to the theory that human problems stem from faulty patterns of thinking. Thus, a clinician would like to help his clients to challenge their thoughts as well as to encourage them to find logic in their way of thinking. In turn, that facilitates his clients in moving beyond the exploration of thoughts and feelings to insight and action.

    Reply

    • Anna Lindgren
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 10:01:02

      Hi Yen! Walking and yoga have been balancing and grounding activities for me too during the pandemic. I want to get more into meditation but have found it hard to settle into a practice. Do you have any suggestions? I’m missing in person classes too, hopefully we can be back in the classroom sometime soon! See you in class,
      Anna

      Reply

      • Yen Pham
        Jan 14, 2021 @ 11:40:26

        Hi Anna,
        I am happy to know that we find the same ways to balance ourselves. I am sure you are not the only one who find that is not easy to settle into a practice a meditation. I sometimes also find that is hard too but I have tried to focus more on my breath and I think what we think about while meditating that is matter. Thus, I sometimes have reflected on the day, practiced gratitude for both negative and positive things, chose a phrase that I like and repeat it, and tried to open my chakras during mediation. I also think the place and the time to meditate is important. For me, I prefer to practice it on the early morning or before the time is to bed. I hope some of my suggestions will work for you.

        Reply

    • Yen Pham
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 10:40:32

      Hello Everyone,
      I apology for my misspelling on the first post, I meant “Hello” Not “Hell” 🙂 Thank you for your understanding and I am looking forward to seeing you all in a few hours.

      Reply

  13. Tayler Weathers
    Jan 13, 2021 @ 14:15:33

    My name is Tayler Weathers, and I graduated in May of last year from Trinity University in San Antonio, TX. My most adaptive coping skill during the pandemic has probably been pushing myself to FaceTime my friends! My biggest takeaway from last semester was that grad school seems to be what you make it – if you push yourself, you can learn a lot more about the subject than you ever thought you’d need to know! It’s awesome. My initial thoughts about CBT are that I’m excited to get into the mechanism of it, I’ve only had surface-level intros previously, which talk about that it works, but not necessarily why or how! So I’m excited to get all that background, and of course imagine myself actually doing it!

    Reply

    • Cailee Norton
      Jan 13, 2021 @ 17:16:47

      Hey Tayler!

      I’m glad that you’ve been able to connect more with your friends with Facetime. I think it’s been so important to keep our friends close during such an odd period of time. I had a FaceTime Christmas with my parents and I was really glad that we had the technology to even do that. Like you, I’ve only had basic introductory classes into CBT without diving too deep into the nitty gritty of it, and I’m really excited that this program offers such in depth courses in it.

      Reply

    • Yen Pham
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 12:12:41

      Hi Tayler,
      I agree with you that technology is one of the key factors in helping us to balance our lives in this pandemic. I am glad that you have met with friends through Face Time that makes you more happy and contributes to your balancing life. As like you, I am so excited to study more about the meaning and applying the CBT in the field of counseling because what I have known and thoughts about it just is very basis on the definition.

      Reply

  14. Cailee Norton
    Jan 13, 2021 @ 17:13:18

    Hey everyone,

    My name is Cailee, and I graduated May 2020 from Framingham State University with a major in Psychology and minors in Sociology and Anthropology. My most adaptive coping skill during the pandemic has been experimenting with cooking and baking. I’ve tried to cook at least two new interesting dishes every week and have been able to make some of my favorite foods at home instead of getting take out (like hot pot, sushi, jollof, curried dishes, gyros, etc.). With the pandemic being able to feel like I’m still trying new things has been important to maintain sanity.
    My biggest take away from my first semester of graduate classes has been to be organized, keep up with readings, and doing the work ahead of time. Graduate classes are fast and keeping up with them can seem daunting with maintaining other responsibilities, however it is really worth it in the end to make sure you are fully understanding the material and reaching out for assistance if you have questions. I’ve had very little work place experience with CBT, and only basic introductory courses on it as well so I’m very excited to really understand the fundamentals and applications of CBT for my future clinical endeavors.

    Reply

    • Lilly Brochu
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 09:02:52

      Hi Cailee!

      I would love if you could share with me some pictures or recipes of the dishes you have cooked over this pandemic! I love learning new cooking and baking recipes, and trying new foods. I find it interesting that you chose to make dishes that are staple foods outside of the American culture. I have been really wanting to create a curry dish because I have never tried it before! 😮 Good luck with this semester, you will do great!

      Reply

    • Anna Lindgren
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 09:56:13

      Hey Cailee! I have a love/hate relationship with cooking, what has been your favorite new recipe that you’ve tried? I totally hear you on keeping up with readings. It’s a lot of work, but it’s better than waiting till the last minute and risking not understanding a concept for a big paper or exam. See you in class!
      Anna

      Reply

  15. Anne Marie Lemieux
    Jan 13, 2021 @ 21:32:18

    Hi my name is Anne Marie Lemieux. I received my Masters in School Counseling from Fitchburg State University in 2011. I’ve realized I’ve turned into my father during the pandemic. I now enjoy documentaries and woodworking. In addition to upcycling furniture, I’ve moved and reorganized my whole house. While I’ve been out of school for a long time, I learned a lot during my first semester. My biggest take away from it was that I made the right decision to pursue my dream to be a therapist. My initial thoughts about cognitive-behavioral therapy is the importance of evidenced based research. I hope to work with children and I’m looking forward to learning more CBT techniques.

    Reply

    • Yen Pham
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 12:02:38

      Hi Anne,
      I admire your spirit of learning. Congratulate you with your Masters in School Counseling and wish your dreams of becoming a therapist to be fulfilled and successful. I have realized that you are not only good at studying but you also good at woodworking.

      Reply

  16. Lilly Brochu
    Jan 14, 2021 @ 07:59:04

    Hi everyone! 😊 My name is Lilly Brochu. I graduated from Worcester State University last May. In the beginning of the pandemic, the after-school program I worked at closed, and it freed up quite a bit of time for me that I did not have before. Journaling was one of the best coping skills I had to dump all my negative thoughts out in the morning or at night before bed. Moreover, I used a journal and a planner to create and maintain a routine as best as I could during the week to stay consistent and motivated. Before the pandemic, I was working out 5-6 days a week at the gym, and because gyms were closed, I had to get creative with home-workouts because I had limited equipment. Working out consistently at home helped me cope because of how good it made me feel after I was finished with it. Other things that soothed my anxiety during this time were cooking and baking, binging tv shows, and video games. At the end of my first semester of graduate school, I realized that time management was even more critical than it was in undergraduate. At the start of this semester, I made the decision to cut hours down at work to give myself more time because I was struggling to find time for myself between school and a 35-hour work week last semester. Lastly, cognitive-behavioral therapy is one of the more practical and best approaches to therapy. It appeals to me because it challenges the individual to reverse their negative thoughts and behaviors. Overall, that is incredibly difficult and takes time because they can be so routine and deeply integrated into our personalities. I am looking forward to learning and understanding the CBT model a lot more this semester because I do not have a lot of knowledge in this area since it was not touched upon very often in my undergraduate studies.

    Reply

    • Lina Boothby-Zapata
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 20:00:10

      Hi Lilly,
      I find amusing your journalism cope skill. I used it for a few years during my undergraduate school. Quick question, did you figure out what to do with it, or your notes are sitting on a bookshelf? I burned mines when I decided to immigrate to the US. I kind of regret that.

      Reply

    • Carly Moris
      Jan 16, 2021 @ 19:22:24

      Hey Lily!

      I agree with you cooking and baking are a great way to destress, especially considering you get to eat whatever you make! Do you have anything specific you like to cook or bake when you are stressed? Personally my go to food for stress baking are these triple chocolate chip cookies.

      Reply

    • Anne Marie Marie Lemieux
      Jan 17, 2021 @ 16:27:35

      Hi Lily, I think the importance of maintaining a routine during the pandemic has been essential to keeping some sense of normalcy. I am inspired that you are working out regularly. It is my goal for 2021 to exercise at least four times a week. Recognizing that you needed more balance in your life and making it happen is such a healthy approach that not everyone takes. I hope you have a wonderful semester!

      Reply

  17. Anna Lindgren
    Jan 14, 2021 @ 09:50:05

    Hey everyone! My name is Anna and I graduated from Emerson College in 2014. The most adaptive coping skill that I integrated during the pandemic was getting into a regular yoga practice, which has helped tremendously with both my mental and physical health. My biggest take away from my first semester is that there is still a lot that we don’t know about what causes mental disorders, and even how medications to treat them work within the brain, but regular assessments can help give us a picture of how the client is doing in various areas of functioning. My initial thoughts about cognitive-behavior therapy are that it is a reliable form of treatment that is focused on the here-and-now and is action-oriented. It seems to be the most effective type of therapy for helping clients to reach treatment goals in a timely manner, and I’m looking forward to learning more about how to implement CBT skills in a clinical setting.

    Reply

    • Nicole Giannetto
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 13:37:58

      Hi Anna! I enjoyed reading your post. I love that you’ve been utilizing yoga skills throughout this time. I enjoy practicing yoga as well, and it is great self-care activity that is SO good for the mind, body, and sou! I also like how you emphasized that CBT is practicing being in the ‘here and now’. I noticed how this relates with your interest in yoga practice, because both can be effective when we tap into that mindfulness that comes from concentrating on the present. Once we can do that, the rest can fall into place if we maintain that work. I am looking forward to working with you in class!

      Reply

  18. Christina DeMalia
    Jan 14, 2021 @ 11:53:44

    Hi everyone! My name is Christina and I graduated from Nichols College. A new coping skill I’ve developed over the course of the pandemic has been playing videogames. For years I’ve had reliable coping skills like yoga, meditation, and reading which I have kept up with. However, my biggest issue with the pandemic has been boredom. I was used to having a crammed scheduled so now all of this free time has left me feeling too relaxed and bored, and there’s only so much Netflix a person can watch. So instead I picked up my boyfriends “coping skill” of playing video games, Warzone specifically. It lets me socialize and talk to friends over the headset that I wouldn’t get to see in person, try something I have never done before and build new skills, work together as a team to communicate and accomplish tasks, and pass time in a way that’s at least a little more exciting than just watching TV. I’ve found it to be a fun distraction without being too passive.

    My biggest take away from my first semester has been that I definitely picked the right field for myself. My friends and family love making fun of me for how happy I get about being in classes, but I genuinely get so excited every time I read a new article or have a new project to work on. I know they’ve gotten tired of me saying “Want to hear about this really interesting thing I learned?” but it is nice to know I picked something to study that truly excites and interests me. As for CBT, it has always been the approach that makes the most sense to me. The more we learn about it in our classes, the more that has been solidified. I think that the point of therapy can often be to changed unwanted behaviors and to reinforce positive behaviors. However, the change in behaviors can’t happen without understanding the thoughts and reasoning that go into people’s choices and actions. Understanding both the cognitions and the actions of a person and how they are intertwined is the best approach to understanding the whole picture and making real change.

    Reply

  19. Carly Moris
    Jan 14, 2021 @ 12:33:13

    Hi everyone! My name is Carly and I graduated from Assumption College in 2019. One of my most adaptive coping skills during the pandemic has been trying to go on daily hikes with my dog. It’s nice because I live in a very wooded area and there are a number of trails near my house. Though, I haven’t been able to go as much recently due to the winter weather. So I ended up doing a fair amount of painting over break as a way to relax. One of my biggest take always from last semester was how important it is to stay organized and stay on top of work. I started keeping a white board calendar of all the readings and assignments I have due, which really helped me stay on top of things!One of the things I like about CBT is that it is evidence based. This makes me feel more confident in the skills and techniques we will be learning because they are backed up by research. I also know that CBT has been shown to be extremely effective for helping individuals with anxiety or depression.

    Reply

    • Connor Belland
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 21:10:17

      Hi Carly, I definitely agree with you about the importance of organization. I realized this last semester but have always struggled with it but am hoping i can keep improving my organization and time management skills as I am sure they will be crucial for when we are actual practicing counselors.

      Reply

  20. Nicole Giannetto
    Jan 14, 2021 @ 13:24:06

    Hi everyone!
    My name is Nicole Giannetto. I began my first year of undergrad at Loyola University in Chicago, IL studying psychology in 2016. After freshman year, I made the decision to transfer to Merrimack College to be closer to home and graduated from there this past spring with a Bachelor’s degree in psychology and social justice. My most adaptive coping skill during the pandemic has definitely been facetiming friends and going on walks outside.
    My biggest take-away from my first semester of graduate classes is that it has reaffirmed what I want to do in my career. There is a lot of work, but it is endlessly interesting and I am eager to learn as much as I can.
    I was introduced to CBT in undergrad in a few of my psych courses. I work at an inpatient behavioral health center for individuals with psychiatric illnesses and co-occurring substance use disorders whose treatment plans are developed by following a CBT as well as DBT framework, so I’ve been able to see how this type of therapy translates into a real life setting. I am very excited to learn more about CBT to implement into my work currently, and in the future!

    Reply

  21. Timothy Cody
    Jan 14, 2021 @ 15:08:53

    Hey everyone,
    My name is Tim. I graduated from Assumption last May 2020. During the pandemic I have been keeping sane by reminding myself of my accomplishments, all that I have been able to do, and all that I want to do. For example, one of my passions is travelling and I have been able to do a lot of that before and during my undergraduate. At this point, we are all accustom to quarantining or staying in one place for a period of time. I remind myself during these times that I had plenty of opportunities to travel and explore the country and world before the pandemic and that I will have ample opportunities to do so again in the future.
    My biggest take away from the first semester is that I have a lot to learn. Graduate school is definitely more advanced and fast paced than undergraduate school was. However, I realize that this because our professors are simply pushing us in the direction that they know we will help us succeed. I find I am doing more work outside of the classroom rather than inside the classroom. When I was in my undergraduate, I would usually complain or become irritated if we are instructed to read or learn something for homework that we do not discuss in the classroom. But as I have grown and matured, I know that whatever I learn either inside or outside the classroom will help me progress in my future as a counselor. My initial thoughts on cognitive-behavioral therapy are that it is the most effective form of therapy (according to many of my professors in the Psychology Department at Assumption). Having not experienced any other form of therapy in my education or real-life experiences, I find that Cognitive-behavioral therapy is my preferred method of use. I look forward to exploring it further as my time in the program progresses.

    Reply

  22. Pawel Zawistowski
    Jan 14, 2021 @ 15:32:55

    My name is Pawel Zawistowski and I graduated from UMass Amherst. My most adaptive coping skills have been running, hiking, and skiing most recently with the cold weather coming in. My biggest take-away from my first semester is that graduate school is a lot more work than I had expected! However, I am enjoying this program a lot so far and am glad that all the material we are covering are topics directly related to my major. My initial thought about cognitive-behavioral therapy is that it is very useful therapeutic approach to helping an individual dealing with mental health challenges. Going over some of the useful tools in our clinical skills class with Dr. Stoner has helped me better understand the goal of psychotherapy.

    Reply

    • Lina Boothby-Zapata
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 15:50:19

      Post

      Hi all,

      I am from Colombia and a mother of two kids that made my life busy and happy. I immigrated ten years ago to Massachusetts.

      I have two bachelors’ degrees, one in psychology, and the other in philosophy, and a Specialization in Clinical Psychology and Mental Health from my country. I studied French and Latin doing my Bachelors in philosophy and only English in my late 20’s no a good thing at all.

      It sounds weird but I have taken this pandemic as an opportunity to re-enroll in the program. I am also taking time to exercise every morning or take a nice walk with my hubby and our chocolate lab, Sansa Stark. Lol. Also tried to do meditation, and finally … I have my therapist for already 3 years, she is psychodynamic oriented and she has been so helpful! Wondering what Dr. V is thinking about it right now 😊

      Anyway, what I desperately miss is the library and have a coffee with friends, chat, and laugh without having the fear of being infected.

      My theoretical background in psychology has been hardcore psychoanalysis, meaning French psychoanalysis, Jacques Lacan, Miller, and obviously Freud and his friends. My dream in my 20’s was to go to France and complete my Ph.D. at Paris VIII University. I guess life change and I divorced from them!! Here, I am it took me 15 years to get into Bandura, Beck, and the rest. Never is too late and I am on board and happy to continue this learning experience for me of a new perspective about the human being and therapies.

      Reply

      • Tim Cody
        Jan 15, 2021 @ 18:07:52

        Hi Lina,

        I dont think we have ever talked about this but I also graduated in my alma mater with two Bachelor degrees in psychology and philosophy! I have gotten to know both departments here at Assumption very well. I have also take time in my early 20’s to travel to France! I hope you get the chance to visit Paris someday!

        Reply

    • Althea Hermitt- Mcpherson
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 18:21:49

      Hi Pawel, I responded to your post because I find your name interesting and was wondering where you are from or where did your name come from, it’s unique. Your adaptive coping skills are great I’m about to embark on a fitness journey however hiking and skiing are not my favorites but it great that you enjoy these adventurous undertakings. Graduate school is definitely some good work. I love this program and professor Stoner she is just amazing.

      Reply

      • Pawel Zawistowski
        Jan 14, 2021 @ 18:31:35

        You’re definitely right she is amazing! Also, I hope some day you give skiing and hiking a second chance. Taking on winter sports is essential for getting through New England’s brutal winters. And thank you for the compliment, my name is Polish.

        Reply

    • Connor Belland
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 20:17:17

      Hey Pawel, Good to hear you have been able to get out of the house a bit to help cope with stress. I have also found skiing to be a great activity for the pandemic. Its not any different at the ski mountains because everyone has always worn a mask skiing anyways.

      Reply

    • Elizabeth Baker
      Jan 16, 2021 @ 16:55:22

      Hello Pawel!

      It is so cool that you ski! I have always wanted to try winter sports like snowboarding and/or skiing, it seems really fun. It is nice that you have activities to get you out of the house!
      I can also agree that assignments for grad school are very different compared to undergrad. There is far more reading now and more time is required to complete high-quality assignments. Although I am also glad that these assignments are in line with our career paths, as they keep us motivated and interested.

      Reply

  23. Connor Belland
    Jan 14, 2021 @ 17:21:38

    Hi! I am Connor Belland and I graduated from Umass Dartmouth. The best way I found to cope this past year was through exercise and working out. One of my biggest takeaways from first semester is how much writing there is in grad school, but also the importance of building rapport with clients. My impression of CBT is it definitely seems a very powerful and useful tool that I can’t wait to learn more about, i understand what it is on paper but i am interested to learn what it actually looks like in therapy. I just need to start making the connection between when someone says they are using CBT methods and what that actually looks like.

    Reply

    • Pawel Zawistowski
      Jan 14, 2021 @ 18:26:46

      Hey Conner! I am glad to hear you’ve been able to exercise to cope with this pandemic, I know all the state guidelines have discouraged many people from doing so. I also had a similar impression of my first semester in grad school is that there is so much writing involved.

      Reply

    • Tim Cody
      Jan 15, 2021 @ 18:14:59

      Hey Connor,

      I definitely felt the same with our papers from the first semester. We are definitely being pushed to write more than I ever thought possible. I think in total from the fall semester I wrote over 100 pages. But I know that this is higher level education and our professors simply want to push to where they believe we will succeed. All this writing will definitely help with creating Assessments in our future careers. Hopefully it will also translate into action with CBT as well.

      Reply

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Adam M. Volungis, PhD, LMHC

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