Introduction: Say a Little about Yourself! {by 1/13}

Yes, it’s this again!  For most of you this is your second semester of graduate classes and it’s in class!  We’ll see how long that lasts!  Let’s continue to get to know each other.  Please answer the following about yourself (some same, some different): (1) Name?  (2) What college/university did you graduate from?  (3) How has your life changed the most since COVID-19 pandemic?  (4) What was your biggest take-away from your first semester of graduate classes? (5) What are your initial thoughts (or experience) about cognitive-behavioral therapy?!?

 

Your original post should be posted by 1/13.  Post your two replies no later than 1/15.  *Please remember to click the “reply” button when posting a reply.  This makes it easier for the reader to follow the blog postings.

 

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41 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Tressa Novack
    Jan 07, 2022 @ 16:44:34

    Hi, everyone! My name is Tressa. I attended Assumption University for my undergraduate years and decided to get my Master’s here as well. My life has changed in a couple ways because of the pandemic. When it started I was a junior in college, and now I am in my second semester of graduate school looking for an apartment in Worcester to move into at the end of this semester as my time living on campus will come to close. It feels like I grew up and became an adult in a blink of eye, because I missed out on many of the fun experiences that were supposed to come with being an upperclassman in college. However, I did get to spend a lot more time with my parents, because my dad had to work from home and I was home from school for an extended period of time. I feel like I became closer with both of them.

    My biggest takeaway from my first semester of graduate school is time management. During high school and my undergraduate years I would do all of my assignments at the last minute. In graduate school I learned that I could not put off work, and still expect to do well. This is because the workload was so much greater, and the work was more challenging. I definitely learned how to really prioritize and manage my time better last semester, which actually made my life less stressful in the long run.

    My initial thoughts about cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is that it is evidence based practice that targets negative patterns of thinking and aims to adjust those thought patterns. I actually am in therapy right now with a therapist who uses CBT. One of the exercises that I practice is analyzing my negative thoughts by seeing what triggers them, analyzing how they make me feel, what a more rational explanation for the thought is, and then reframing that thought into a neutral thought. It has been helpful in making me more aware of my own negative thought patterns and catching those thoughts before they spiral.

    Reply

    • Victoria Cestodio
      Jan 11, 2022 @ 16:10:54

      Hi Tressa!
      I can totally relate with getting closer to my parents since the pandemic. Going from living at school to back at home with them definitely strengthened our relationships. Also, I totally understand the feeling of missing out on upperclassmen experiences, I couldn’t even have a graduation which was such a bummer and really upsetting.

      Great post:)

      Victoria

      Reply

    • Lauren Pereira
      Jan 11, 2022 @ 16:33:09

      Tressa,

      It is nice to read about how the pandemic has made you closer with your parents! It is easy to see that even though the pandemic has made us miss out on a few opportunities in our twenties, there have still been some positive outcomes throughout the process.
      Just like you, I was actually able to manage my time better throughout our first semester of graduate school. It is something important to grasp when working towards earning a masters degree. Having this skill will help us overcome more obstacles!
      I like how you incorporated your real life experience of CBT into your definition. It proves that the process of targeting negative patterns of thinking does work in therapy.

      I enjoyed reading your post!

      Lauren

      Reply

  2. Victoria Cestodio
    Jan 11, 2022 @ 16:06:31

    Hi everyone!
    My name is Victoria. I graduated from Western New England University in May 2021. This pandemic has definitely shifted a lot of things for many people, one way it has changed my life was socially. The pandemic definitely made me more of a homebody and I tend to appreciate my alone time a lot more now compared to before the pandemic, which I see somewhat as a positive thing.
    My biggest takeaway from my first semester of grad classes was that there are a lot of readings….and you actually have to read them. In undergrad having ‘readings’ meant I had no homework, but in grad school that is not the case at all. Doing your readings in grad school is actually very important. Also another takeaway I had is that you have to make time for yourself. You can’t always be doing school work, because you will indeed lose your mind a little bit.
    My initial thought on CBT is that I feel it is highly effective and interesting. With CBT you are trying to reframe and rewire someone’s thoughts (whether they are intrusive, negative, etc.). I think it is a powerful way to do therapy and it leads to more positive outcomes than negative ones. I also like that CBT can be used with an array of disorders, which is another huge pro. Disorders such as depression, anxiety, phobias, eating disorders, sleeping disorders, etc. can all be helped with CBT!

    Reply

    • Lauren Pereira
      Jan 11, 2022 @ 16:25:03

      Victoria,

      The pandemic has definitely shifted our social lives and it shows because I also enjoy my alone time. It is nice to find the good in these types of situations.
      I completely agree with you about the readings. In undergrad, it was okay if students did not have time to complete their readings because it wasn’t always the most important task. In graduate school, I have done a significant amount of reading compared to other years in college.
      I like your comments about CBT because I feel the same way. CBT has shown that it is effective and it is even interesting to learn more about. This type of therapy has also proven to help with several different disorders which shows how broad it can be.

      I enjoyed reading your post!

      Lauren

      Reply

    • Tressa Novack
      Jan 11, 2022 @ 21:23:42

      Hi Victoria! I’m glad that you found that you appreciate and enjoy your time alone more than you did before the pandemic. I feel like the pandemic has had the opposite effect on me, but I admire that this has been your experience because I think it’s really important that we are comfortable with time to ourselves. I think nowadays with social media people forget what it is to truly be alone and spend time with themselves, and it’s great that you can do that. Your comments about reading made me laugh. I feel like I read until my eyes are about to fall out of my head. I get you.
      Tressa

      Reply

    • Jeremy
      Jan 13, 2022 @ 13:33:59

      Victoria.
      I definitely share your experience of being shocked by the amount of reading for the program. readings in undergrad were often disjointed from the class itself and it wasn’t well-integrated, However here the reading is a lot longer and denser and provides so many relevant details. Good luck balancing the reading time to mental breaks, sometimes it’s best to walk away from the readings a bit!

      Reply

    • Madelyn Haas
      Jan 13, 2022 @ 18:35:17

      Hi Victoria,

      The pandemic has also made me more of a homebody. While I still do like to go out and get dinner sometimes, I often times feel perfectly content sitting in my room with my cat and playing Animal Crossing. Also, your point on making time for yourself is really important. I found myself struggling with that last semester, especially when Dr. Doerfler gave us his take home exams, haha. I need to find a good balance between school and doing things I like.

      Reply

  3. Lauren Pereira
    Jan 11, 2022 @ 16:19:05

    Hi everyone, my name is Lauren Pereira. I had recently graduated from Worcester State University in May of 2021 where I received my Bachelor’s of Science in Psychology. Being familiar with Assumption and the city of Worcester, I began my graduate program here in the Fall of 2021. I went through many life changes throughout the pandemic where a lot of experiences of mine were cut short. I was not able to have in-person classes my entire senior year of college. Unfortunately, I was not able to have a traditional college graduation either. Other than that, I feel as though I have grown in such a short amount of time. Having a lot of time for myself, I was able to become more active and kept myself busy with some new hobbies. I was also able to start a new career and have been working with kids through this pandemic.

    I learned a lot throughout my first semester of graduate school. I started off struggling when trying to balance my time between work and school. Throughout the semester, I was able to create better daily schedules for myself and I have significantly improved my time management skills. I have put aside more time for myself and more time to get school work done so I am not stressing out as much as I used to. The workload is more significant in graduate school so it did take some adjusting to determine the best set schedule for myself. I now have a much easier time completing homework assignments without having it interfere with my work schedule.

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a significant form of treatment that is very popular for therapists to use with their clients. CBT tends to focus on reducing ones mental health conditions by targeting their negative thoughts. These types of patterns tend to have more positive outcomes on treatment. Each individual has their own struggles and they all cope in different ways which makes conditions more possible to overcome when using a CBT method because they can be based on the specific needs of each individual. This process gives the client a better idea of how their thoughts make them feel and how this may disrupt processes of their daily lives.

    Reply

    • Victoria Cestodio
      Jan 12, 2022 @ 11:40:21

      Hi Lauren!
      I can totally relate with not having a college graduation, I spoke about that in my post too, and it was definitely a difficult thing. I also agree with you that balancing work and school was a big struggle. It definitely took me some time to get adjusted to, and once I figured out exactly how to manage everything I felt a lot less stressed out all the time.

      Victoria

      Reply

  4. Tressa Novack
    Jan 11, 2022 @ 21:27:58

    Hi Lauren, I am sorry to hear that you did not get to have a graduation. I can imagine that was a really tough situation to not get to graduate with the people you had just gotten so close to over the past four years. However, it’s great that you’ve had the opportunity to start a new career. For all you know this could open many doors for you in the future. I also found that I have gotten better at time management thanks to the first semester of graduate school. I used to be a huge procrastinator, and now I only procrastinate slightly!

    Tressa

    Reply

  5. Monika
    Jan 12, 2022 @ 12:48:57

    Hello everyone, my name is Monika Dhamale. I graduated from Pune University, India. The pandemic has not only changed my daily routine but also my perspective. First, it made me realize never to take friends and family for granted and that your time is limited, so it’s really important to appreciate and cherish the relationships and people in your life. During the first year of the pandemic there was a lot of confusion and chaos. I was experiencing a lot of emotions, I was really worried about my family, my dad being a veterinarian and a government employee, had to work outdoors. He came in contact with a lot of people which was scary because at the time we did not have any vaccines. Along with this was a sense of Isolation that I never experienced before. I couldn’t meet my friends, neighbors or even go out for a cup of coffee because India had strict lock downs for almost the entire first year of the pandemic. Initially I tried to be happy by convincing myself that the lock downs are going to be like a long vacation where you can stay home and relax. But soon I realized that sitting around and having a lot more time than usual, I didn’t know what to do. I was bored of being bored and I realized how important our routines, social interactions, and connections are. I picked up a few hobbies, started exercising regularly and even tried meditation to stay sane.

    The first semester was really exciting for me as this is my first time in the States. My biggest takeaway from first semester has been being organized. I realized that it’s important to make a note of all the dates of assignments, exams and presentations well in advance. I actually missed adding the due date for a paper in my schedule and I realized it on the same day it was due. I almost had a mini heart attack and I was freaking out. Even though I managed to finish it in a day, I experienced a lot of unnecessary anxiety. So, I realized it’s crucial to plan everything in advance and have enough time to prepare.

    I think to be an effective therapist it’s important to have enough ‘tools’ in your bag to deal with your clients effectively. And CBT offers a lot of techniques, some of which I was not aware of. I learned that CBT is an approach that relies on the evidence-based principles which are derived from research. I also learned that one of the essential component of CBT is homework, thanks to which clients can practice the skills they have learned in sessions in their daily life and might gain the chance to apply the coping techniques taught by the therapist when they face challenges.

    Reply

    • Jeremy Wronski
      Jan 13, 2022 @ 13:47:06

      Hi Monika.
      I certainly relate to the need to note dates well in advance. the end of the semester felt like a whirlwind, and despite my best efforts, things kept creeping up on me. One of the biggest takeaways from the first semester that I found was that its good to have due dates, but recognize that even the best systems fail and not to get discouraged and to tackle the project anyways!

      Reply

    • Will
      Jan 13, 2022 @ 21:18:05

      Hey Monika,

      It was especially interesting to hear a different cultural experience on the pandemic like how shutdowns/lockdowns were different and how you felt during that difficult time. You made a great point during the lockdown about not taking your friends and family from granted. It’s pretty crazy how in the span of a few weeks how everything went from normal to as you said not even being able to get a cup of coffee. I’m glad you were able to find your own ways of coping with boredom during this time!

      Reply

    • Will Roche
      Jan 13, 2022 @ 21:24:16

      Hey Monika,

      It was especially interesting to hear a different cultural experience on the pandemic like how shutdowns/lockdowns were different and how you felt during that difficult time. You made a great point during the lockdown about not taking your friends and family from granted. It’s pretty crazy how in the span of a few weeks how everything went from normal to as you said not even being able to get a cup of coffee. I’m glad you were able to find your own ways of coping with boredom during the pandemic!

      Reply

  6. Jeremy Wronski
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 13:26:50

    HI everyone, my name is Jeremy Wronski, I graduated from Sacred Heart University in Fairfield CT. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed a lot of my life, but the most significant change is the amount of time I have spent offline, reading books as an intentional break from our new digital world. The strongest takeaway from last semester was how experienced we already are. In my mind only having a bachelor of Psych meant I had little knowledge in the field, but throughout the classes last semester I had come to realize how specialized my knowledge had become. Through brief introductions to the measurements and therapeutic framework that CBT inhabits, I realized how small my knowledge of CBT is. I am excited to learn about the formal CBT process and to understand why CBT functions so well in therapy. While I understand that CBT seeks to identify negative thought patterns, and attempts to build new behaviors to improve the client’s emotions I am excited to get into the formal therapeutic process this semester. .

    Reply

  7. Vanessa Nichols
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 18:04:31

    My name is Vanessa Nichols. I graduated from Keene State College this past May. I majored in psychology and minored in Addiction studies.

    When this pandemic started, I was a junior at Keene state now. I am on my second semester of grad school and figuring out my internship. I also lived in New Hampshire when this pandemic started, I did not always enjoy how New Hampshire handled the pandemic, but I am glad to be back in Mass. Other than the significant time since the pandemic started, my overall life and interests have not changed much. I like being at home reading, watching movies, hanging out with a couple of friends, so socially distancing and staying inside has not been too difficult for me to adjust to.

    My biggest takeaway from the first semester is that projects, reading, and exams just keep on coming, so it’s essential to keep up with the weekly work or you will become overwhelmed very quickly. I notice this semester that there are even more readings for each class. I think long-term planning and time management are the best skills to have in grad school.

    I do not have much experience in CBT, but I am excited to learn. I know that CBT focuses on connecting thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. One thing I like about CBT therapy is that the goal is for therapy to end. The client actively works in therapy alongside the therapist. The goal is to teach and help the client, so in the future, they will be able to handle these things or situations on their own. CBT skills and training can be used for almost every disorder.

    Reply

    • Madelyn Haas
      Jan 13, 2022 @ 18:30:05

      Hi Vanessa,

      I couldn’t agree more on the time management aspect of graduate school. I feel like we have to read every day to not fall behind sometimes. The readings really stack up, and I already have to catch up on some classes because my textbooks aren’t all in yet.

      Also, I agree with your takes on CBT as well. The fact that CBT is evidence based and heavily involves the client is what drew me to this type of therapy. I’m looking forward to learning a lot about it over the next year and half.

      Reply

    • Will
      Jan 13, 2022 @ 21:21:03

      Hey Vanessa,

      I’m interested to hear how dealing with the pandemic was different in New Hampshire than it was here. I also was a junior in undergrad when the pandemic started and here we are now. Crazy how that time felt so slow yet fast at the same time when you look back on it. I had a similar feeling to you when people ask how I dealt with the pandemic. As content as I am socially with people and going out, I am also perfectly content with staying in and doing things in socially distanced manner. Looking forward to this semester and how we can continue to deal with the pandemic during our second semester in the program.

      Reply

    • Will Roche
      Jan 13, 2022 @ 21:23:51

      Hey Vanessa,

      I’m interested to hear how dealing with the pandemic was different in New Hampshire than it was here. I also was a junior in undergrad when the pandemic started and here we are now. Crazy how that time felt so slow yet fast at the same time when you look back on it. I had a similar feeling to you when people ask how I dealt with the pandemic. As content as I am socially with people and going out, I am also perfectly content with staying in and doing things in socially distanced manner. Looking forward to this semester and how we can continue to deal with the pandemic during our second semester in the program.

      Reply

  8. Will
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 18:11:37

    My name is Will, I attended Quinnipiac University and graduated in 2020. I feel like we have been in the pandemic for so long that I’ve forgotten what is different about my life from before the pandemic began. I really can’t think about anything that has changed so drastically other than wearing masks and being generally more cautious around those that may be ill. When the pandemic started I was on vacation in the Dominican Republic when I was 22 in my senior year at QU. Now we are still in the pandemic and I have had my first job in the field of psychology, left that job and returned to school in this graduate program.

    My biggest take-away from the first semester of graduate classes is to not overwhelm yourself with the thought of how difficult it may be, but rather to take it one step at a time and it will eventually become easier than you had initially feared it might be. I have been somewhat familiar with cognitive behavioral therapy for quite some time now, probably since my junior year in college when I started to learn about Beck and Ellis and I gravitated towards the practicality of CBT and knowing how there is empirical evidence to support that CBT actually works. If I was going to dedicate my life and a career to something, I wanted to make sure that it was something that is known to actually work, rather than speculate if it does or not. This is why I have always liked CBT or other methods of therapy and what ultimately led me to this program at Assumption.

    Reply

    • Monika
      Jan 16, 2022 @ 23:25:07

      Hi Will,
      You made really good points. I totally agree with you when you said not to overwhelm ourselves, I could relate to it so much because in the first semester I took some time figuring out what is expected in the assignments, papers and presentations. And even though initially it felt like a lot of work, it got easy with time. I learned to just focus on the task at hand and not worry about the next exam or assignment. It’s good to hear that others feel the same way.

      Reply

  9. Alexis
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 18:18:03

    My name is Lexi, I graduated in 2017 from Fitchburg State University. My life has changed less than most thankfully, I was able to work remote for much of 2020/2021 before making the decision to go back to school. The biggest change for me was probably just not being able to go out to eat etc. as often in the beginning. My biggest take away from the first semester in the program was that there is a lot I have to learn about CBT and about the therapeutic process in general. I am excited to get into the coursework this semester and increase my knowledge and understanding, as well as start to get a better feel for what my own clinical style will start to look like. CBT is really fascinating to learn about and the more I understand the approach the more confident I feel about my decision to choose this program specifically, I love how CBT empowers the client / person seeking therapy to effectively change their own life circumstances and combat poor mental state with the assistance of a therapist. The active role that the client has in therapy I think is a really cool and empowering thing, so I am excited to start.

    Reply

    • Moises Chauca
      Jan 14, 2022 @ 21:18:48

      Hello Alexis,

      Your post makes good points. Before the pandemic, I had many plans and wanted to try many restaurants, but they all were canceled as well. Finally, you said good points about CBT and how the relationship and active role between therapist and client helps them feel empowered and make a change, I feel that this is true and a unique thing of CBT.

      Reply

  10. Madelyn Haas
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 18:25:04

    Hi, my name is Madelyn Haas. I went to Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas for my undergraduate degree. I graduated in December 2019, so just before everything got messed up by COVID-19. In reality, the biggest change in my life since the pandemic started was unrelated to the pandemic itself. My move from Texas to Massachusetts was the biggest adjustment for me, especially with the weather, haha.

    I’ve enjoyed my time up here thus far, especially when going to class and being able to see everyone. I’m looking forward to getting back into the classroom. My biggest takeaway from last semester of graduate school was that everyone feels some degree of imposter syndrome right now. I thought that everyone else would, I don’t know, feel more ready or more capable than I do. It turns out that everyone that I’ve spoken to feels a mix of nervous and excited about our future careers.

    As for my knowledge on CBT, I currently only know the basics like cognitive distortions/common styles of thinking and the thoughts, feelings, behavior triangle. Everyone’s got to love that triangle, right? I think I’ve already written it in my notebooks 3+ times since the beginning of graduate school. I’m looking forward to learning more this semester, especially interventions.

    Reply

    • Vanessa Nichols
      Jan 15, 2022 @ 10:21:11

      Hi Madelyn,

      I really liked and related to your post, especially about the imposter syndrome. As messed up as it sounds, it is nice to know that we are not alone in feeling like we don’t know anything or are not prepared enough for this next step. It is not true for any of us, but it’s nice to know that I am not the only one that freaks out sometimes.
      I imagine that the move from Texas to Massachusetts would be a substantial change, especially during the pandemic when it’s harder to get to know people and get out there. Being online must make all those changes so much worse. I believe once we get into the spring and summer months, you will really start to like Massachusetts. I am really excited to start learning more about CBT as well. Between this class and the addiction intervention class, I feel we will get a great fundamental understanding of CBT this semester.

      Thank you!

      Reply

  11. Sandra Karic
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 18:31:41

    Hi everyone! My name is Sandra and I finished my undergrad at Trinity University in San Antonio, TX. My life has changed a lot since the beginning of the pandemic; I finished college (no graduation though, yay class of 2020), completed a DBT oriented internship, learned how to bartend, and moved from San Antonio TX to Worcester, MA.
    I think my biggest takeaway from the first semester of graduate classes was that I have actually learned how to manage my time better. I was very disorganized as an undergrad, and while I did improve my habits towards the end of college, I was nervous that I didn’t have the discipline to manage a graduate workload and a job. So I was glad to see that I have continued to improve my work habits and was fairly successful in managing my time last semester.
    I feel like CBT is versatile in the sense that it can be a very effective treatment for many different disorders and I like how much evidence there is supporting it. Last semester we did not discuss many specific interventions, other than recognizing common styles of thinking and the cognitive triad. I am excited to learn more about CBT and its associated interventions this semester!

    Reply

    • Moises Chauca
      Jan 14, 2022 @ 20:52:08

      Hello Sandra,

      I enjoyed your post! Time management is crucial, and I shared a similar experience with you about my time management before starting the program. However, I have been able to get the hang of it and like they say practice makes perfect. Finally, I agree with you that CBT is versatile and really effective for many disorders. I am excited to practice and learn more intervention as well.

      Reply

    • Monika
      Jan 16, 2022 @ 23:33:09

      Hi Sandra,
      I could relate to the points you made regarding time management. It took some time for me to get organized as well with my daily tasks and I have benefited a great deal from it. I also liked the point you made about CBT being versatile and effective in treating a lot of different disorders.

      Reply

  12. Emily Barefield
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 19:44:52

    Hi! My name is Emily. I graduated from Trinity University last May. As a result of the pandemic, my family has grown closer, which makes me feel very fortunate. At the beginning of the pandemic, of course, my family spent a lot of time together and tried lots of new things – new recipes, games, outdoor activities etc. So, as strange as it sounds, that time was really special to me. We also had more frequent facetime calls with extended family, which has been helpful in growing relationships with them. Because maintaining relationships during the pandemic requires such intentionality, this time has also helped me realize which relationships are important for me to maintain and which ones were more draining and perhaps formed out more out of convenience or close proximity.
    My biggest take-away from my first semester of graduate school is the importance of planning and sticking to that plan. It was really helpful for me to plan out exactly when I was going to do each reading and assignment. It also helped me feel less overwhelmed by the amount of readings and projects I needed to get done and stress about one thing at a time. I am very excited to learn more about cognitive behavior therapy. I am drawn to CBT because of the research that supports it and because of the wide range of mental disorders it can be used to treat. I also find the ability to help someone identify their thoughts and to improve their experience to be fascinating. I have found that being able to analyze my own thoughts and identify problematic thinking patterns or the thoughts that are contributing to my negative emotions and changes in mood to help me feel unstuck and not necessarily controlled by my emotions.

    Reply

    • Sergio Rodriguez Pineda
      Jan 15, 2022 @ 19:01:05

      Hi Emily,

      I agree with you that CBT is the most evidence-based therapy, making it the most helpful for patients. Moreover, it is also the basis for many other therapies (DBT, ACT) effective that are based on it. Therefore, this specific course is suitable to apply the knowledge to yourself and then explain it and apply it with clients, understanding the process of how thoughts, emotions, and behaviors affect each other and they can be modified to generate changes.

      Great post,

      Sergio R.

      Reply

  13. Moises Chauca
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 21:01:14

    Hello, My name is Moises Chauca. I graduated from Worcester State University. Since the pandemic, my lifestyle has changed much. I seemed to find myself more on my room and computer for online classes and remote working, which has affected my mental and physical health. Last year, many of the plans I was looking forward were canceled, and the holidays felt much different without my friends and other family. However, this change has provided me with some time to spend time and create new memories with my close family.
    My biggest takeaway from this first semester was that I learned much and had a good experience. I quickly realized that time management is crucial because graduate courses provide many reading assignments and exams that could be easy to fall behind. I learned a ton of information about psychological instruments, counseling, and mental disorders that will help me for this semester.
    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is fascinating for me. My initial thoughts about CBT are that it emphasizes the importance and connection between thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In addition, CBT provides many effective techniques to help a client change their behavior and thoughts. Lastly, one crucial aspect of CBT is the positive therapeutic relationship, as this is a predictor of the patients’ treatment effectiveness and outcome.

    Reply

    • Emily Barefield
      Jan 15, 2022 @ 11:41:57

      Hi Moises,

      I can certainly relate to feeling the effects online classes and remote work on my mental health. I am glad you had the opportunity to make new memories with close family.
      Time management has also been a skill I needed to improve last semester, especially with keeping up with all of the reading. You make some good points about CBT, and I like your emphasis on the positive therapeutic relationship.

      Reply

  14. Will Roche
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 21:23:23

    My name is Will, I attended Quinnipiac University and graduated in 2020. I feel like we have been in the pandemic for so long that I’ve forgotten what is different about my life from before the pandemic began. I really can’t think about anything that has changed so drastically other than wearing masks and being generally more cautious around those that may be ill. When the pandemic started I was on vacation in the Dominican Republic when I was 22 in my senior year at QU. Now we are still in the pandemic and I have had my first job in the field of psychology, left that job and returned to school in this graduate program.

    My biggest take-away from the first semester of graduate classes is to not overwhelm yourself with the thought of how difficult it may be, but rather to take it one step at a time and it will eventually become easier than you had initially feared it might be. I have been somewhat familiar with cognitive behavioral therapy for quite some time now, probably since my junior year in college when I started to learn about Beck and Ellis and I gravitated towards the practicality of CBT and knowing how there is empirical evidence to support that CBT actually works. If I was going to dedicate my life and a career to something, I wanted to make sure that it was something that is known to actually work, rather than speculate if it does or not. This is why I have always liked CBT or other methods of therapy and what ultimately led me to this program at Assumption.

    Reply

    • Sergio Rodriguez Pineda
      Jan 15, 2022 @ 18:46:05

      Hi WIll,

      I definitely agree with you sometimes we just go with it day by day, and it is hard to remember how things were before the pandemic. Did you get locked down in the Dominican Republic when everything started?
      I also consider it is good for your experience as a future therapist that you have had an experience in the field. Wish you the best in the program.

      Thanks for the post!

      Sergio Rodriguez

      Reply

  15. Pilar Betts
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 21:45:53

    Hello! I’m Pilar, I graduated with my bachelors in psychology with a minor in sociology from Western New England University. My social life has been the main change during the pandemic, I wasn’t a person who went out all the time but I did hang out with my friends more often but now I don’t really want to go places especially indoors because I become very anxious. I have always been cautious of germs but being in a pandemic is probably my biggest fear.

    My first semester of graduate school was alright. It’s crazy how fast time goes by the fact I will be starting practicum this summer is crazy. It almost seems too soon. The amount of reading is overwhelming, in undergrad we had readings but you could skim through them and get a good understanding. The readings for graduate school are more wordy and lengthy which is terrible. I don’t know when I’ll be able to read for pleasure again! Ha ha. Also I liked having later classes in undergrad, but now … not so much.

    My initial thoughts about cognitive behavioral therapy were that it is a pretty effective approach to therapy because it accounts for the effect of peoples thoughts on their behavior. I enjoy watching some of the videos of interviews with clients because they are helpful with understanding the concepts and indicators for particular disorders. I also feel as if my personal style I develop as a counselor will mesh well with cognitive behavioral techniques.

    Reply

    • Vanessa Nichols
      Jan 15, 2022 @ 10:30:10

      Hi Pilar,
      I totally relate to your change due to the pandemic. I used to go out a little, but now I just get so anxious, especially indoors. Pre pandemic, I loved going to shows/concerts, but now I just get so anxious at the idea that I have not been able to go to one. I think this pandemic really opened a lot of people’s eyes to personal space and germs in general.
      I can’t wait till I get to read for pleasure again too. There is just so much reading it can be exhausting, and I do not want to read in my free time from reading for this program. You are right too. It was easy to skim and get the gist of it in undergrad, but for the grad program, you can’t do that without missing vital information.
      Thank You!

      Reply

    • Emily Barefield
      Jan 15, 2022 @ 11:53:31

      Hi Pilar,

      I can also relate to my social life changing significantly since the pandemic. It is hard to balance being safe due to the virus and trying to maintain social relationships. I also have struggled with trying to read for pleasure too. Although I really do enjoy reading, it is hard to want to read after reading for school all day. Having night classes has also been an adjustment for me. I think I prefer to have class first and then have the rest of the day to work.
      I also enjoyed watching videos of counseling sessions last semester, especially in 600. It helped me have a better grasp of the techniques and how they can be implemented.

      Reply

    • Sandra Karic
      Jan 16, 2022 @ 12:50:17

      Hi Pilar,
      I definitely relate to becoming more anxious after the pandemic began. I’ve always had a lot of health anxiety and Covid has made it so much worse. It was especially bad when I was living in Texas because I’d get really bad allergies and I was constantly trying to figure out whether I was experiencing allergies or had gotten Covid. I also am not the biggest fan of how late some of our classes are. I used to be able to stay up late without any problems but now that I’ve gotten a bit older I find myself struggling to stay up past 10pm.

      Reply

  16. Sergio Rodriguez Pineda
    Jan 13, 2022 @ 23:58:28

    Hi all

    My name is Sergio Rodriguez. I graduated from El Bosque University in Bogotá, Colombia as an undergraduate in psychology. My life changed because of Covid since part of my family lives in Spain, and I was able to go see them for a long time.
    My biggest take-away from my previous semester was to organize my time better and set clear limits at work when I am taking on too many responsibilities, and I’m getting extra work from my full-time job that is interfering with my duties at school.
    I consider cognitive-behavioral therapy the first approach to the experience-based psychology method. Before that, it was easy for me to follow any method or “therapy” that could show quick results or was interesting. Now, I learned how substantial is the evidence on the therapy and the investigation related to it. In addition, this therapy unifies the Cognitive and Behavioral components. From the therapist’s perspective, the human being is seen from a more holistic view, which leads to better understanding and treatments for the mental health problems.

    Reply

    • Sandra Karic
      Jan 16, 2022 @ 12:41:57

      Hi Sergio,
      My ability to see my family was also affected by the pandemic. Most of my family lives in Serbia and it really sucked having to cancel plans to see them, especially since it was already hard to see them before Covid. I also had learn to start setting firmer boundaries with work as I spent a lot of the semester being pressured into working extra hours which started making it extremely challenging to keep up with school.

      Reply

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Adam M. Volungis, PhD, LMHC

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