Topic 8: Appraisal of Personality {by 11/4}

Based on the text reading and lecture recording due this week consider the following two discussion points: (1) How can accurate personality assessment help the therapeutic relationship and treatment?  (2) Discuss your concerns about the continued use of projectives impact on clients and/or the mental health field.

 

(Prepare for Class) – Complete the following for class: (1) Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), (2) Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS), (3) GAD-7, and (4) PCL-5 (I gave copies of 1-3 in class; access 4 on my website).  (Please remember to come prepared with a few questions/observations.)

 

Your original post should be posted by 11/4.  Post your two replies no later than 11/6.  *Please remember to click the “reply” button when posting a reply.  This makes it easier for the reader to follow the blog postings.

56 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Moises Chauca
    Oct 30, 2021 @ 21:50:00

    Accurate personality assessments are beneficial for the therapeutic relationship and treatment in many ways. The therapist is able to identify the client problems more accurately and provide an effective treatment. The therapist can use personality assessment to identify important factors that are influenced by the client personality. Whiston (2013) states that a client personality influences many factors like coping styles, needs and desires, and environmental stressors. For the therapist, these factors are helpful to create a positive therapeutic relationship and provide an effective treatment. Lastly, an inaccurate personality assessment cannot provide these important factors that can lead to damaging the therapeutic relationship and have a no or negative effect on the client problem.
    The continued use of projective techniques does make me concern for the client and the field. Many of these techniques have no empirical research behind them and have none or a negative effect on the client. These interventions that do not or have little reliability, meaning that they do not have validity. A client personality assessment’s results can be interpreted in many wrong ways, that can damage the therapeutic relationship and negative effects on the client treatment. In addition, these techniques focus exclusively on the psychodynamic theory and conceptualize the client drives, defense, and conflicts to external stimuli and environment. One of my concerns is that these concepts promote the unconscious mind that can reinforce the impression that dysfunctional beliefs are out of control of the client. Lastly, some of these techniques have many racial and ethnicity biases that lead to false positives or negatives. This causes me great concern because these social factors have many great influences on the client personality. However, these techniques should be updated to solve all of their critical points because it can be helpful to the therapist when integrated with structured personality instruments.

    Reply

    • Victoria Cestodio
      Nov 01, 2021 @ 14:42:47

      Hi Moises,
      I really liked how you incorporated that quote from Whinston. This was an interesting fact because coping styles are a huge part of therapy and how we try to overcome what is going on with us. Therefore this shows how personality is so important to therapy. I also mentioned in my post that projective tests really bother me because of the racial biases and that they lead to false positives and negatives as well. I would be interested to see what these tests would look like if they were updated.

      great response!

      Reply

    • Will Roche
      Nov 03, 2021 @ 13:36:59

      Moises,

      You make some great points on the negative impacts of projective tests in the mental health field. First and foremost, these tests lack reliability, and therefore do not exhibit validity. Especially in the program that we are in, where we rely on empirically based evidence, it’s crucial to see how projective tests lack objectivity in assessment. For other concentrations in counseling, objectivity is not deemed as important. However, for our case in CBT, it’s vital that we assess and treat based on empirically based evidence. Moreover, the racial/ethnicity biases that some projective tests have are also detrimental for clients and the mental health field, and I like how you said that if these tests are still going to be used, they need some updating. This was a similar point that I made in another response. Overall, it’s important that for assessment, we use objective and empirical evidence to diagnose and treat clients. Great work.

      Reply

    • Kelsey McGinness
      Nov 07, 2021 @ 15:54:38

      Moises, I like the points you bring up about a lack of reliability and validity within these assessments as well as the racial biases that can occur. The points you raise are valid and thought provoking, great job!

      Reply

  2. Vanessa Nichols
    Nov 01, 2021 @ 12:30:22

    I believe that accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment because it creates a deeper understanding of who the client is, how they view the world, themselves, and other people. Although Personality assessments can be wishy-washy, I believe if they are not used for diagnosis, but to provide insight to the client, they can be very beneficial (like the Myer Briggs). The Myer Briggs is very cool because none of the personality types are right or wrong; they just are. All the personality types do is provide information on the client, their behaviors, and thought processes. I believe personality assessment can provide information on how much of the problem can be fixed. For example, introverted people who struggle with social anxiety give the counselor a realistic understanding of how much this problem can be solved and potential problem areas regarding treatment.
    I don’t like projective techniques; they contribute to the notion that psychology is not a “real” science. I believe they contribute to this notion because they are not empirically based. They lack reliability and validity. Projective techniques are often biased and subjective; the clinician’s opinion, view, and values often contribute to their interpretation of the results. Many projective techniques require expensive time and training; my personal opinion is that they are not worth it. Also, some of these assessments are a little old and have racist views like the TAT. The TAT pictures can be highly racists. If you presented this to a client, you would lose some credibility because it is clearly racist pictures. The book mentions that if you use these assessments to initiate conversation, that is a good way to use them, and for some of them, I can see that benefit, but for a lot of them, I believe they need more empirical evidence.
    I believe using projective techniques can be detrimental or have adverse effects for clients because they infernal a lot about the client based on subjective results. These results may not be accurate or could be exaggerated based on the clinical personal views or feelings. These techniques are also found in the psychoanalytic theory that focuses on the unconscious mind and drive. I believe focusing on the unconscious can hurt the client’s belief in their ability to get better.

    Reply

    • Victoria Cestodio
      Nov 01, 2021 @ 14:49:51

      Hi Vanessa,
      I also had the same thought on Myer Briggs! I like how there is no “wrong” or “right”. But, this still provides therapists with information about the client’s personality which I think is great and also unique. After reading your thoughts on projective tests, we share many of the same views. I also think they need much more empirical evidence to support, and also failing to have reliability and validity makes them extremely unappealing to me. I don’t think they have any real use within our field and even if they were revised I would still feel iffy about them.

      great response!

      Reply

    • Bekah Riley
      Nov 01, 2021 @ 18:02:26

      Hi Vanessa,

      I thought your post was great this week! I really enjoyed reading your description of the negative effects of projective techniques on the mental health field in particular! I liked how you argued that projective techniques support the notion that psychology is not a science. This is due to the lack of reliability and validity and how subjective they are because they are solely based on the therapist’s interpretations and opinion. This means that while one therapist may think a client’s responses are concerning, another may not. In addition, I agree that some of these techniques come across as very racist and may ultimately make the client feel uncomfortable or even offended by the assessment.

      Reply

    • Will Roche
      Nov 03, 2021 @ 13:28:49

      Vanessa,
      I think you did a great job at clearly illustrating the issues with projective tests in counseling and the effects they could have on clients and the mental health field. Your descriptions are straight to the point, and defined very well. Furthermore, highlighting the racial undertones of TATs is a great point that may be overlooked by those who have used them or maybe currently still do. While TATs are not great sources of assessment anyway, it might be important to see changes in what these TATs look like. Take the pictures away from anything that may be racially construed and revamp the pictures to eliminate any racial undertones there may be. Overall, any findings from these tests should be regarded as purely subjective and therefore don’t serve a great purpose is assessment for treatment. Great points all around.

      Reply

  3. Monika
    Nov 01, 2021 @ 12:47:43

    The American Psychological Association stated that Personality assessments involve the scoring, administration, and interpretation of “empirically supported measures of personality traits and styles” to inform and structure interventions, increase the accuracy of behavioral prediction in various contexts and settings, and refine the clinical diagnosis. Assessing a client’s personality is a part of the counseling process since individuals’ personality is frequently intertwined with their problems and issues. Therapeutic interpersonal relationships have the capacity to transform and enrich the clients’ experiences. Personality can have an influence over coping styles, needs and desires, responses to environmental stressors, interpersonal patterns, and intrapersonal sensitivity. And so, an accurate personality assessment can help in selecting interventions and making decisions about the treatment which will work in the long run and provide better results in comparison to when an assessment is done inaccurately. An accurate personality assessment can help the client get a better understanding of themselves and help the mental health professional to have better communication, discussions which in turn will improve the therapeutic relationships.

    Projective techniques involve asking subjects to interpret or fill in visual stimuli, complete sentences, or report what associations particular words bring to mind. I think the major drawback of projective techniques is the subjectivity in the interpretation of these techniques. In addition, there is no professional consensus on how any of these techniques should be specifically interpreted. Furthermore, there is significant controversy associated with some projective techniques such as Rorschach, Hunsley & Bailey, 1999 claiming, “There is currently no scientific basis for justifying the use of the Rorschach scales in psychological assessment”. Another concern I have is the risk of interpretation bias. Sometimes mental health professionals interpreting and analyzing the responses of the examinees could misinterpret the results and perhaps assume that a benign response is seemingly hostile. The reliability evidence for most of these techniques is quite low, which means there are higher proportions of error in these measures as compared with other measures. Drawing inaccurate inferences from projective tests could seriously harm the client because it could point towards personality flaws or shortcomings which the client doesn’t have. Rigorous interviewing and analysis are required to draw conclusions from projective techniques. This, coupled with the need for trained professionals, can make it an extremely expensive process on part of the client.

    Reply

    • Bekah Riley
      Nov 01, 2021 @ 17:55:26

      Hi Monika,

      I really enjoyed reading your post this week! I really liked how you went in depth when describing how a client’s personality is intertwined in therapy. As you stated, many of the client’s problems have a relation to their personality type. That is why it is so important for the therapist to have an understanding of their client’s personality in creating a treatment plan.

      Your description of why projective techniques are not beneficial in the mental health field gave me a better understanding on the subject. As you mentioned, there are no set standards for how each test should be interpreted; it is usually up to the therapist to interpret and decide whether the client’s responses are a cause for concern. This leads to inconsistency in interpretations on various techniques from different therapists.

      Reply

  4. Victoria Cestodio
    Nov 01, 2021 @ 14:35:11

    Accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment in a variety of ways. If the therapist is able to understand the client’s personality more, the therapist will then know how to forgo treatment better. This also strengthens the relationship by having the client being open to different treatment options. Whether you get a diagnosis or not from a personality assessment, I do not think that is the most important part. If you do get a diagnosis that is great, however if you don’t you can still get so much information about your clients personality that can lead you to develop a closer bond. For example, a client may have anger problems. Then, as the therapist we give them the ADS. Their results show that it is not as severe as we may have thought, however now we can focus on specific items they answered that may be affecting them more than others, which then leads us to develop better treatment and it gives us more insight on more specific things that make them feel or act angry.

    Projective tests will sadly continue to have a negative effect in the mental health field. These types of tests do concern me because it’s the epitome of “correlation does not equal causation”. An example of this would be the rorschach inkblots. The inkblot shown in the lecture could have many interpretations such as elephants, people high fiving, sorts of aggression, or seeing something more sexual. As Dr. V said in the lecture, it’s sometimes human nature that someone would respond seeing something sexual. Therefore a person seeing something sexual would be seen as more abnormal than seeing the elephants for example, but correlation does not equal causation in this scenario. Also the racial biases these tests have is absurd, and should not still be practiced. Obviously as we saw in lecture, Dr. V stated how these can then lead to false positives and negatives which would be extremely damaging. These types of tests are not evidence based, and therefore I don’t see much use for them at all.

    Reply

    • Vanessa Nichols
      Nov 02, 2021 @ 12:50:25

      Hi Victoria,
      Really great post this week. I like how you talk about using personality assessment to see if a problem presents and then using other assessments to really understand the severity and impairment of the problem. I do worry about using any personality assessment for diagnosis due to a lack of reliability and validity. I worry that diagnoses from these would be inaccurate.
      Projective tests make me very nervous. I believe that they are extremely subjective I believe your example from the lecture highlights how subjective they can be. I worry that this subjectivity contributes to the negative notion about psychological research and tests.

      Reply

    • Lauren Pereira
      Nov 02, 2021 @ 16:00:16

      Victoria,

      I really enjoyed reading your response! I find accurate personality assessment to be important within therapy and it seems to involve the relationship with the client and therapist. I like how you mentioned that the more the therapist learns about their client’s personality, the better treatment they will have access to. This is very relatable as you need to go to know your client before moving forward.

      I also agree that projective techniques are causing negative effects. I thought of the same example when learning about this topic. Rorschach inkblots can be viewed in multiple different ways which can be difficult in resulting in positive treatment. You make another good point that this involves false positives and negatives which will do more damage to the effects.

      Reply

    • Madelyn Haas
      Nov 02, 2021 @ 22:19:02

      Hi Victoria,
      I enjoyed reading your response. I think your point about diagnosis is great. Diagnoses, while helpful, are not the only important part of therapy. Not only that, assessments are useful for many other purposes, like understanding a client’s motivations, for example. I also agree with your point on projectives. While they can be interesting and kind of fun, they are not very reliable or valid. If we interpret too much based on non evidence based assessments, we could actively harm our clients. It is best to use well researched and empirically supported assessments instead.

      Reply

  5. Bekah Riley
    Nov 01, 2021 @ 17:46:42

    An accurate personality assessment can help with both the therapeutic relationship between the client and therapist as well as the treatment plan for many reasons. In having a more accurate knowledge on a client’s personality, it may be helpful for the therapist in identifying different problems the client may have. Identifying those particular problems then helps the therapist decide which treatment plan would be most beneficial to the client. For example, a client who has been diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) that is also very introverted may respond well to one intervention while another client with GAD who is very extraverted may not. In understanding a client’s personality, it gives the therapist a more in depth understanding of how that client may either improve or not with certain treatments/interventions. In treating the client effectively by gearing their treatment plan to their personality type, this may help the therapist establish a more therapeutic relationship with the client because the client may feel more comfortable moving forward with the treatment and with their therapist that helped construct their treatment plan.

    The continuing use of projective techniques in the mental health field is concerning. The wide range of interpretation for different projective techniques makes it seemingly impossible for the therapist to draw accurate conclusions about their client. For example, the Rorschach Inkblot Test provides the client with a number of inkblots in which they are asked to say what they see. However, there are many different ways the client can interpret the inkblot. The client’s interpretation may lead to concern from the therapist, but with the unlimited amount of ways each inkblot can be interpreted, it would be very difficult for the therapist to draw and accurate causal conclusion based on the client’s response. As mentioned in the lecture recordings, some responses are just human nature, such as seeing something sexual in the image. However, this may not mean that the client has a problem or is portraying abnormal behavior. Therefore, making accurate conclusions may be very difficult when using different projective techniques such as Rorschach Inkblot. In addition, there is low reliability when it comes to different projective techniques which would make it a poor instrument choice when looking to interpret client problems and treat them.

    Reply

    • Vanessa Nichols
      Nov 02, 2021 @ 13:08:37

      Hi Bekah,
      I think you had a great post this week. I agree with you that personality assessment can be very beneficial to treatment planning. I feel like different personality types will respond to treatments very differently. So it is essential to consider all factors before assigning a treatment plan. I like your example of GAD because I think some therapists may expect more than the client can give. I believe by considering personality; we would have better treatment outcomes.
      I agree that projective techniques are extremely concerning. The lack of reliability is alarming. It’s concerning that one therapist can see a client and get completely different results than the next. I would not use projective techniques.

      Reply

    • Lauren Pereira
      Nov 02, 2021 @ 16:11:44

      Bekah,

      You did a great job explaining accurate personality assessment! I like how you mentioned that this assessment can be helpful in identifying different problems that the client may have. These traits can be important when trying to find the right treatment for your client. I like your example within GAD. It helps identify what can happen if you do not know much about your clients personality. It also shows how important getting to know your client is within therapy. You do not only create a better therapeutic relationship, but it also benefits the treatment plan.

      Projective techniques tend to have a negative effect. I like how you mentioned that the wide range of interpretation that it brings will make it harder for the therapist to determine an accurate conclusion for the client. I also thought of the same example within Rorschach Inkblots. This technique concludes that there are various amounts of choices that can come which result in less of an accuracy within finding the conclusion. Therefore, it is not only a poor technique but it can also effect a person’s mental health within therapy.

      Reply

  6. Lauren Pereira
    Nov 02, 2021 @ 15:24:19

    Accurate personality assessment is yet another important construct within therapy. Getting to know the client in a deeper and more sufficient way can benefit the therapeutic relationship as you are learning more about your client. From this, the client also gets to open up and gain trust in their therapist. This not only benefits the relationship with client and therapist, but it also benefits the treatment that the client is obtaining. The therapist will get a better idea on how to treat their client with the more information they are given. Getting a better idea and understanding of what your client is like and what their hobbies are can help a therapist adjust their treatment plan. Continuing to learn more accurate personality assessments is a great start to therapy and it can also help a therapist determine changes that may be necessary. A type of personality test that relates to this assessment is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, as it contains many valid and reliable constructs in measuring personality. These types of test back up accurate reasonings for why personality assessments are so significant within therapy.

    The idea of projective techniques allow for respondents to project their opinions and beliefs onto others. With such a wide variety of interpretations, this will make it extremely difficult to determine more accurate information on the client. This technique can damage one’s mental health as well as cause more lack in success throughout the client’s sessions. There is a huge lack of reliability and validity as these techniques are more subjective. It does not allow for the client to voice their opinion and feel secure in the therapists response. There seems to be a lot of negative feedback and different outcome on the use of projective techniques, like in the Rorschach Inkblots, for example. These inkblots may identify as different objects and can be confusing to others. In this specific type of scenario, we also see how correlation does not equal causation. These constructs can be misleading for clients. Overall, the projective technique can cause more obstacles for the clients and it will effect their ability of future success.

    Reply

    • Madelyn Haas
      Nov 02, 2021 @ 22:25:14

      Hi Lauren,
      Great response! I agree that personality assessments can be extremely beneficial for treatment plans. The more you get to know the client, the better you can treat them. You will slowly figure out what does and doesn’t work for your client, and personality assessments can help expedite the process. Not only are they helpful for the treatment plan, personality assessments can help engage clients because they get to learn about themselves as well. As for your response to projectives, I couldn’t agree more. Ultimately, I think they can do more harm than good, especially if you put too much emphasis on your interpretation of the projective. For example, if you think a client seeing a sexual image in an inkblot makes them a sexual deviant, this could hut the client and make them feel bad about therapy.

      Reply

    • Mary Altomare
      Nov 04, 2021 @ 18:11:20

      Hi Lauren,
      I really enjoyed reading your post this week and I thought it was super insightful. As you explained, personality assessments may be very beneficial in understanding the client on a deeper level and provide the client with a more effective treatment. Additionally, I agree with you that knowing your clients interest, hobbies, and likes/dislikes can assist the therapist with implementing interventions that involve there preferred activities. Furthermore, the book does talk about a lot of awesome assessments that are reliable and valid to use when assessing for a client’s personality.

      Reply

  7. Madelyn Haas
    Nov 02, 2021 @ 22:14:05

    Personality assessments can be extremely useful for counseling. By giving a client a personality assessment, you learn more about them as individuals and learn what can help them in therapy. Personality assessments can help you build rapport with a client. If you know what their personality is like, you can tailor how you interact with them to best fit them and their needs. For example, if you learn that your client is bashful and reserved, you would not want to talk to them in the same way you would talk to a super outgoing client. Personality assessments can also help you, the clinician, make informed decisions on what interventions to use with a client. For example, you might not want to give a person who is not open to new experiences an intervention that pushes them too far out of their comfort zone. If you do, there is a good chance they will not follow through with it. It is important to tailor the counseling experience to each individual client in order to help them the most effectively.

    While projectives can be useful in some cases, particularly with children, they are not very reliable or valid. Not only that, there is often not a set way to interpret the results. They can be very subjective to interpret. In that sense, you may not actively be learning anything useful about your client. For example, just because a child draws a violent image doesn’t mean they are being abused by their parents. The child could have just seen it in a video game or movie or could be drawing a nightmare. Not only are projectives subjective on the side of the therapist, there is a lot of variability on the side of the client as well. Maybe the client will finish sentences with aggressive phrases because they are exhausted, hungry, and in an overall bad mood. Projectives make the field of counseling less data-based and ultimately could negatively impact the client. If you misinterpret what their drawings or statements mean, you could wrongly assume what their problem is without having any evidence. Overall, it is best to use more standardized assessment, and if you do use projectives, use them sparingly and don’t put too much stock in the “results.”

    Reply

    • Moises Chauca
      Nov 03, 2021 @ 23:03:55

      Hello Madelyn,
      Your post has many good points on personality assessment and projective techniques. I agree with you about the usefulness of personality assessment.
      These assessments provide the therapist with information that can facilitate rapport building, best approaches to the client, and a good counseling experience. In addition, I liked how you pointed out that projective are useful with children at times but also pointed out that weaknesses of these techniques. Lastly, your point about prioritizing standard assessment rather than projectives holds truth because these are low evidence techniques. Great work!

      Reply

    • Mary Altomare
      Nov 04, 2021 @ 18:06:38

      Hi Madelyn,

      I really enjoyed reading your post this week! I liked the way you explained the benefits of personality assessments, and the different ways clinicians can utilize these assessment to build rapport and connect with their client. Also, I too, talked about how personality assessment can be helpful with clinicians, specifically with selecting certain interventions for that client, which would deem most fitting. I also enjoyed reading your explanation and examples of projective techniques, it helped me understand this technique better. As you stated, this type of technique does not have a fixed way of scoring the results and they are often subjective when the clinician interprets the results. Drawing conclusions based on a kiddos drawing could be detrimental to the kiddo and there therapeutic experience.

      Reply

    • Olgena
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 18:55:45

      Hello Madelyn,
      I enjoyed reading the examples that you described, and I also think that is truly important to create a comfortable environment and build a healthy relationship with you client are equally significant. As you described, I also believe that while for the clinician might be easier to feel comfortable approaching the client, some individuals have difficulties finding their comfort zone, where they can share more about themselves. Personality assessments are a great tool for these individuals to help them focus on important matters, and help the clinician direct his/her attention toward these matters as well. Projective assessments, as you described could have a negative effect on client, because of subjective and misinterpreted conclusions which are not based on empirical data, and represent old unethical approaches.

      Reply

    • Kelsey McGinness
      Nov 07, 2021 @ 15:56:59

      Madelyn,

      You make great points about personality assessments and how they can not only help you determine what a client could get out of therapy but also how it can aid in building a strong rapport with your clients. Great job!

      Reply

  8. Will Roche
    Nov 03, 2021 @ 13:23:55

    According to the textbook, a client’s personality, and the utilization of assessment for personality, is important because of how intertwined one’s personality is with a person’s problems and issues. Many of our daily issues (social, communication) are due to our personal thoughts/beliefs on how these interactions went. This stems from our personality. Secondly, a client’s personality should be assessed in therapy because this might impact the treatment plan for them. If a client’s personality indicates that they may not want intensive treatment immediately, it may be more efficacious to take a slower approach with them. This may also impact their treatment outcome in a positive manner. Another important aspect of using personality assessments is the eliminate the subjectivity of a counselor’s perception to avoid biases based on differing personalities. While observations and interviews are important, the textbook notes that using the psychometric qualities of observation and interviewing is tantamount when assessing personality in clients. All of these factors mentioned may help build a better therapeutic relationship with the client, and therefore, lead to better treatment.

    There are many potential concerns one may have about using projective techniques for clients in the mental health field. Similar to what I discussed previously, the subjectivity of these tests go somewhat against the teaching of CBT. The fact that projective tests are not empirically based delegitimizes them for accurate personality assessment. CBT uses empirically based research, reliability and validity to discern what therapeutic methods are appropriate for clients (in this case personality assessment), and projective techniques lack these qualities. While projective techniques may be appropriate for potential beginning talking points with clients, I would be concerned for anyone who made clinical assumptions based on projective tests at this point in the clinical counseling field.

    Reply

    • Emily Barefield
      Nov 03, 2021 @ 23:55:37

      Hi Will,

      You bring up several good points about how personality assessment can be helpful in therapy. I appreciated that you pointed out that many of our thoughts, which affect our experiences and behaviors, are heavily influenced by our personality. I also liked that you highlighted that personality can be used to choose treatment approaches. If someone is naturally very driven and goal-oriented, a more aggressive treatment may be more appropriate, but if they are more hesitant, slowly working up to treatment goals may be a better approach. I agree that utilizing personality assessments as a check to our observation skills is a great idea.

      You are absolutely correct in that these projective techniques contradict the principles of CBT and the push to ensure that psychology is backed by research. I would also be concerned about a therapist who made clinical decisions with regards to a client based on projective techniques. Great post!

      Reply

    • Sandra Karic
      Nov 07, 2021 @ 22:06:47

      Hi Will.
      I liked your points about how intertwined our personalities are with our problems. I think that was a really good way of putting it. I also think that a client’s personality can impact which interventions and treatment plans a clinician implements. I had similar concerns about the lack of empirical support for projective techniques. While I agree that they can be used as talking points, I too would take issue with their use in clinical decisions.

      Reply

  9. Mary Altomare
    Nov 03, 2021 @ 13:32:38

    Accurate personality assessments can be beneficial for a counselor in order to build a strong therapeutic relationship with their client. Personality assessments can assist the counselor with learning and understanding their client on a deeper level that is beneficial for the client’s therapeutic treatment. Understanding the clients personality, helps the clinician make informed decisions on the interventions they utilize in their sessions. For instance, a client that is more outgoing and strong willed may respond well to the counselor pushing them outside of their comfort zone, versus a client that is reserved and shy. A clinician that understands their client’s personality can create a treatment plan that best suits their needs in order for them to be most successful in their therapeutic treatment. Furthermore, throughout the semester we have learned that understanding, connecting and forming a strong therapeutic relationship is beneficial for therapeutic treatment; I believe understanding a client’s personality can only assist the clinician more with creating a counseling experience that the client will be most successful in.

    Projective techniques is supposed to address some of the limitations of standardized personality assessments by providing clients with an unstructured stimuli for them to respond too. The aim for this technique is to eliminate a client from faking their responses, because they are not sure of what the stimuli is intended to measure. Furthermore, the clinician is supposed to examine and interpret the client’s responses to figure out their meaning. As Dr. V expresses in his lecture, this techniques has absolutely no reliability because it is based on the clinician’s point of view. For instance, the Thematic Apperception Test involves the client telling a story based on a picture that the clinician is showing them. Based on the client’s story, the clinician will examine and interpret the meaning behind it, which again is completely subjective and biased. The projective techniques has little to no reliability, thus making these assessments no valid. Overall, these types of assessment do not provide valid information to help the clinician better understand the client, and can actually cause more harm than good in treatment.

    Reply

    • Tressa Novack
      Nov 03, 2021 @ 20:56:01

      Hi Mary,
      I agree that personality assessments can help clinicians understand their clients more deeply and help them tailor treatment interventions to their client. Clients with different personalities will respond differently to the same interventions, so personality is very important to consider when forming a treatment plan. I like what you have to say about projective techniques. I think it is very interesting how the purpose of them is to eliminate fake responses, but since there is no reliability or validity, real conclusions cannot be drawn from a client’s response. It really does not make any sense for any clinicians to be using them.
      Tressa

      Reply

    • Tom Mandozzi
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 15:41:24

      Hi Mary,

      I really liked your point about how the personality of a client would inform the therapeutic process and treatment planning. I agree; if a client is really reserved and shy and maybe a bit more apprehensive about therapy, then it would be important for the clinician to know this and have a sense of their personality so that they can develop an appropriate treatment plan. If a client is more outgoing and extraverted, there may be a different therapeutic approach toward reaching the goals for this particular client. It is crucial that the clinician adapt to the client’s personality as the most effective treatment doesn’t follow a one-size-fits-all approach. Great post and insight!

      Reply

  10. Jeremy
    Nov 03, 2021 @ 17:15:29

    Personality assessments are useful in assessing clients through this assessment of personality a therapist can hope to provide a more personalized treatment. Personality tests can give clinicians insight into coping stiles, environmental stressors, clients weaknesses and strengths. A good therapist can integrate the information gained into therapy to infom goals, treatments, and can expect to go over results in a therapeutic manner. By polling an individual personality assessment, clinicians can better understand how clients approach problems, and how they handle stressors. These tools are likely not directly helpful in a diagnostic sense, instead, they help get a better sense of the client as a whole, an ipulsive exploralry type may respond to journaling worse than an antisocial reflective type. Using personality tests can help steer the therapeutic relationship.
    USe of projective test in psychology largely sever to undermine our practice as a science. Lending themself to more of a “therapy as an art” projective test have low reliability and validity and spefficaly poor interrater reliability. My biggest concerns about projective tests are their low cultural awareness and their unscientific nature. Many of the projective tests are old, fairly old. This leads to the projective test’s biggest weaknesses. The age of the test results in outdated cultural norms, race, and gender are often not properly controlled for and results in psychology being more white male-centric, as the field was dominated by them for a majority of its existence. These failings show in projective tests by their ideas of norms normal behaviors, and expectations. Secondly, Projective tests are not scientifically backed, its low interrater reliability shows that these tests rely largely on the test givers’ opinion and personal subjective view. Because of this fallibility projective tests, continued use detracts from the practice of therapy at large, they are outdated and inconsistent.

    Reply

    • Tressa Novack
      Nov 03, 2021 @ 20:51:28

      Jeremy,
      I enjoyed reading what you had to say about projective techniques. You make so many great points about why we should not use them. They are not backed up by any scientific evidence, which should be reason enough to not use them. However, as you pointed out they are completely outdated in terms of cultural norms. Many of the projective techniques are racially insensitive, which is another reason for them to never be used in my opinion. Their use contributes to the stigma of psychology not being a real science, and it is really unfortunate.
      Tressa

      Reply

  11. Tressa Novack
    Nov 03, 2021 @ 20:45:04

    Accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment because it can aid the therapist in better understanding their client. According to the book, personality most likely influences many areas of our life such as how we cope, how we respond to stress and our environment, how we view relationships and other people, and how we view ourselves. This information can help the therapist understand what problems we may be having, what thought processes we need to work on changing, and thus, guide them in forming a treatment plan that will be best suited to us. It can also help the therapist better understand how to relate to their clients, which would aid the therapeutic relationship.
    I have many concerns about the continued use of projective techniques in the field. These techniques really do not have much reliability and therefore, no validity. We know very well that humans can make errors when we rely on our observations and interpretations to draw conclusions. Therefore, it does not make sense to use projective techniques when assessing clients. We could come to the wrong conclusions and then form a treatment plan that will be of no benefit to the client. Clinicians can unintentionally project their values and views on the client, and that could be extremely damaging to the client’s progress and the therapeutic relationship. Furthermore, it does not make sense to use these techniques when we are now very capable of conducting good research. When we have the ability to properly and ethically conduct research, I don’t see there being any reason to use assessments that are not supported by scientific evidence.

    Reply

    • Moises Chauca
      Nov 03, 2021 @ 23:23:45

      Hello Tressa,

      Great job on your post! I had many similar points on my post as well. Personality assessments are a good way to understand more the client, and it helps build a therapeutic relationship with them. I liked how you provided examples from the book and connected them to the client counseling experience. Furthermore, you made some good points about projective techniques. We often make errors with observations and interpretations. Projectives are low evidence, and adding the human error factor makes these techniques less appealing to use with clients. Lastly, you are so right! Why keep using projective technique if we have reliable and valid assessments

      Reply

    • Emily Barefield
      Nov 04, 2021 @ 00:03:32

      Hi Tressa,

      I appreciate how you highlighted just how many areas of our lives are affected by our personalities. Having a good grasp on someone else’s personality can go a long way in efforts to understand and empathize with that person. Utilizing this knowledge when determining a client’s treatment plan certainly has the potential to improve their outcomes.

      I think you bring up a great point when you discussed how we have the potential to unconsciously project our values on the client, especially when using projective techniques. I completely agree that it does not make sense to use projective techniques when ethical, evidence-bases alternatives exists. I enjoyed reading your post

      Reply

  12. Emily Barefield
    Nov 03, 2021 @ 23:45:37

    Accurate personality assessment can provide the clinician with an additional method of seeking to understand the client. It may help explain or provide further clarity behind certain tendencies of a client to think or behave in a certain way. This could be particularly useful when a clinician is struggling to read a client while observing them or if the observations the clinician has made are markedly different from how the client views themselves or perhaps how someone else (parent, teacher, etc.) views the client. Personality assessments can be used to help clarify or provide a short cut to determining the client’s problems. Of course, these assessments do not give the full picture of a client’s struggles. Personality assessments can also be used to help the clinician choose interventions and make decisions about treatment that are best suited to the client. A client’s personality likely influences their interests and how they cope with stress. Knowing and incorporating a client’s personality into the process of helping a client utilize coping skills can increase the success of those coping skills. Finally, a client may appreciate that the clinician is seeking to understand their struggles through the lens of their personality, which may build rapport.

    The most obvious concern with projective techniques is their lack of reliability, and therefore their lack of validity. It highly problematic that scores obtained using projective techniques are so inconsistent. Inconsistent scores do not provide useful information. It is impossible for an assessment that is unreliable and has inconsistent scores to be measuring what it was intended to measure well. Because projective techniques are not reliable, they cannot possibly be valid. This is problematic because they are still used as if they are valid. They are used to make decisions that affect the well-being of a client. Psychiatric diagnoses can have a significant impact on the client and can affect numerous areas of their life such as their work and their relationships. Misdiagnosing an individual with a mental disorder can lead to confusion and unnecessary or unhelpful treatment. The racial and ethnic biases present in many projective techniques is also worrisome. Choosing to use a technique that is known to result in overdiagnoses in minority groups, meaning clients from minority groups are told they have a mental disorder when they do not, is unethical. When giving clients a diagnosis that has the potential to impact how they view themselves, how they explain their thoughts and behaviors, and how they make sense of many aspects of their lives, clinicians need to strive to utilize the best and most effective resources available.

    Reply

    • Pilar Betts
      Nov 05, 2021 @ 14:29:21

      Hello Emily,

      I really enjoyed your post this week!
      I liked that you pointed out that while personality assessments can give the clinician an idea of what the clients problems could be however doesn’t give you a full picture. Incorporating the client’s personality into the session helps to build rapport and helps the clinician to know how to work with the client. A clinician can choose how to interact with the client based on their personality, what works to build a relationship with one client doesn’t necessarily work for the next.
      You addressed the lack of reliability when using projective techniques, I agree the well being of the client is of the utmost importance, misdiagnosis is problematic as you mentioned it could affect the client greatly and lead to unnecessary or unhelpful treatments.
      Its also super important that you mentioned the ethnic biases present in projective techniques, and the overdiagnosing of minority groups. These groups tend to be given more extreme diagnoses and therefore aren’t always given the best course of treatment or intervention. Its important Ethnic and cultural biases are brought into attention since so many aspects in psychology were looked at through a white male lense.

      Reply

  13. Kristin Blair
    Nov 04, 2021 @ 09:36:49

    Getting an accurate depiction of a client’s personality will simply help guide the therapeutic process and aid the counselor in choosing particular techniques and interventions that are best suited for the client. Having knowledge of a client’s personality can give insight into how the client may think and process information, how they may conduct themselves in certain situations, and how they may perceive social and formal scenarios. The better grasp a counselor has on the type of personality and person their client truly is will allow them to clarify and choose the best interventions. This also brings a sense of “knowing” to the therapeutic relationship. In other words, a patient would be more likely to feel “seen”, “heard”, and “understood” when they feel as if their “whole self” is recognized. This will strengthen rapport and aid in the therapeutic relationship! We know that this will result in more sessions, more involvement, and a higher positive outcome for addressing the client’s needs. Reaching this goal can be achieved by using a combination of formal and informal assessments.

    Projectives are very unstructured assessments that can be used to assess an individual’s “hidden thoughts or desires,” and is their response to ambiguous stimuli. There is the fact that these assessments could reveal unconscious or latent thoughts and feelings, however, they tend to usually have much lower reliability coefficients than standardized instruments, and many lack sufficient validation information. Another disadvantage is that many of these assessments are costly outdated and rely much too heavily on clinical judgment. Furthermore, they also lack any standardized criteria. Taking all those things into account I think that projectives could have adverse effects on the client due to the prominent level of inferred information.

    Reply

    • Alexis Grey
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 20:32:58

      Hi Kristin
      I agree with you that personality plays a role in how we and how clients think, as well as take in and process information and form perceptions. Understanding those thoughts and perceptions can help guide therapy and inform decision making about the strategies used in therapy. I think understanding personality can help us match to clients and develop a better more authentic relationship which has an effect on the other aspects of the therapeutic process. Unstructured is a great word to use for projective techniques, I totally agree with you they just come off as a little too magical for me and I agree with you that the potential for adverse effects is reason enough to not use these types of “intsruments”

      Reply

  14. Tom Mandozzi
    Nov 04, 2021 @ 12:44:00

    Personality assessment can provide clarity in identifying client problems, help inform interventions and treatment decisions and support the structure of a counseling relationship. I think having a grasp on a person’s personality is helpful in interacting with them because what one behavior means for one individual might mean something different in another. I liked Dr. V’s example of yawning in the lecture recording. If somebody yawns in a class or when you are speaking, it is easy to feel like they are coming across as disinterested or bored. But there are other factors that might be impacting this, such as working a full-time job, etc. The behavior of yawning wouldn’t be an indicator of a person’s personality, but other factors. This drives home the point that a client’s personality should not be judged solely by an hour-long session. I think naturally having a better feel for a client’s personality would support developing appropriate interventions that will support success based on the individual and support communication between therapist and client. Projective techniques are associated with the psychoanalytic approach and these assessments do not have good reliability and validity in the field. For example, the Rorschach Inkblot Test lack’s structure and clear diagnostic value because there is a wide variety of responses that can be given. From a cultural and racial standpoint, as Dr. V mentioned, many of these projective techniques were racist and sexist and inappropriate for assessment. Also, the way these types of tests would vary from one therapist to another and thus would not provide an accurate or standard evaluation of a client’s mental health presentation, which would ultimately have a negative impact on successful treatment moving forward. I liked Dr. V’s point about establishing rapport with clients in ways other than assessment and how administering an assessment should typically not be used to build rapport. Though getting a better understanding of a client’s personality would support rapport building and communication between client and clinician, the assessment itself should not be used for building rapport.

    Reply

    • Alexis Grey
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 20:47:03

      Hi Tom
      I agree with your point that behavior may mean something different for different people or different observers. Adapting your behavior to match to the client I think is a skill that will take time to develop but can be so beneficial to the outcome of therapy. I think your point about projective techniques being somewhat prone to biases is also an important and valid consideration.

      Reply

    • Sandra Karic
      Nov 07, 2021 @ 22:15:34

      Hi Tom,
      I really liked that you brought up the yawning example and not making judgements about a client’s personality based on one hour-long session. I agree with your points on how problematic the lack of reliability is for projective techniques. I also liked how you emphasized the racist and sexist elements of some of these techniques.

      Reply

  15. Kelsey McGinness
    Nov 04, 2021 @ 14:10:49

    An accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment because it can help a therapist better understand how to navigate therapy, communication of therapy, as well as how to simply communicate to ones client. Some clients is more preferred to shoot the shit versus others its better to communicate on a more therapeutic terminology level, whereas others may need another form of communication or relatability to progress in therapy.
    There are many concerns involving the use of projective assessments and their impact on clients and/or the mental health field. For example, there is a high need of interpretation needed to draw conclusions for clients, and due to this high need for interpretation it can lead to inaccurate interpretation therefore proving that correlation does not equal causation. By using projective assessments such as the Rorschach Inkblot Test it can lead to inaccuracy in diagnosis and therefore overall treatment of a client.

    Reply

    • Pilar Betts
      Nov 05, 2021 @ 14:41:09

      Hello Kelsey
      You bought up an interesting point about the “high need” for interpretation in order to draw conclusions about the client when using projective techniques which could lead to overinterpretation or misinterpretation. Not to mention the fact, how exactly is the criteria set to look for certain responses as problematic or connected to a diagnosis. Who decides that if you see a ghost fighting in the picture that means you are depressed and what happens when someone’s response doesn’t fit into specific interpretations? Every client is different and symptoms present in different mixes. Some people are just really creative and outside the box when they look at artwork, but that doesn’t necessarily warrant a diagnosis.

      Reply

  16. Alexis Grey
    Nov 04, 2021 @ 16:10:43

    Accurate personality assessment helps the therapeutic relationship because having a good understanding of the client’s personality can assist you in building rapport and adjusting how you interact with that client to make them feel comfortable within the therapeutic relationship. You want to adjust your own manner of speaking, word choices etc to fit the personality of the client as best as possible in order to make them feel understood and comfortable. Similarly having a good understanding of the client’s personality can help guide treatment and intervention techniques. Some interventions may be better suited to certain personalities as opposed to others and so it can be helpful to consider personality when selecting interventions. Personality can also play a role in the way the client interacts with their environment and within interpersonal relationships, therefore personality can tell us a lot about the types of issues clients are having in their day-to-day life, and how they deal with issues when they do encounter them. Personality can help us identify client strengths and weaknesses in terms of how they interact with their world.

    Projective techniques are a bit outdated in my opinion and are not really supported at all by any type of research. The vagueness of these techniques I think is dangerous if they are being used to make any big decisions about treatment or about diagnosis. These tests are so subjective and so unsupported by actual data that it seems like its maybe a step above a horoscope? I am not sure why they are still used but I know if I was in treatment, these are not the types of tests, I would want my therapist or psychologist using to judge me, my mental state, or make decisions about my course of treatment. Essentially my issue with them is the subjectivity, you could do an ink blot test with 10 psychologists and get 10 very different results because it’s too open to human interpretation and biases. It feels sort of like palm reading or fortune telling to me.

    Reply

    • Teresia
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 21:22:51

      Hi Alexis,

      I enjoyed reading your post! I agree that understanding the client can help in treatment cause you could have a better gauge when they might struggle and how they deal with the stress of treatment. Projective techniques are outdated and they lack reliability and validity. I liked your analogy that they are like horoscopes because I was thinking the exact same thing.

      Reply

  17. Teresia
    Nov 04, 2021 @ 16:58:50

    Accurate personality assessment helps the therapeutic relationship and treatment because it helps the therapist understand the client better. Having a better understanding of the clients can make it easier to identify the clients problems and issues. Accurate personality assessment also helps in treatment decisions and choosing interventions. Although it is also important to remember that personality assessment can not give a full picture of the clients issues.
    The use of projective techniques impacts on clients and/or the mental health field does concern me. The technique is unstructured and lacks reliability which means it also lacks validity.It’s also very easy for a clinician to come to their own conclusion and misunderstand what the clients struggles are or the message they are trying to convey is.I believe they are a little outdated and require lots of training which I truly don’t think is worth it. There is also the problem that these techniques are unsuitable for assessment due to the sexist and racist influence.

    Reply

  18. Pilar Betts
    Nov 04, 2021 @ 22:28:11

    Establishing rapport and building a relationship with a client is the most important thing in counseling, therefore having an accurate assessment of personality is valuable. Personality has an influence on a variety of factors such as coping skills, needs and desires, interpersonal patterns, intrapersonal sensitivity and responses to environmental stressors. Personality assessment can also give the therapist valuable insight on how to structure and build their relationship with the client and aid in the selection of treatments and interventions. It is important that counselors’ observations are objective when assessing personality. A person’s personality consists of their beliefs and biases as well as other aspects, Counselors have to be aware of observations being influenced by their own beliefs and biases.If the Counselor has an accurate assessment of the client’s personality it helps the counselor to execute and appropriate plan of action for a particular client, for example if a personality assessment reveals that the client is a people pleaser then the counselor can pay attention to times the client is trying to validate the counselor rather than the other way around. The counselor can also make observations about how the client may be navigating real life situations based on their personality. If the counselor is aware of a particular trait they then can look for it. The two types of personality assessments are informal and formal. Informal personality assessments are observation and interviewing; these can give the counselor an initial understanding of the client’s personality. Formal personality assessments help the counselor to get deeper into how exactly the client’s personality influences their lives and influences how they interact with other people. This is done through the use of structured personality tests; which are structured questions that help the counselor to identify particular symptoms that could correspond to particular diagnoses. For example the MMPI-2 which assesses multiple categories of behavior based on the clients answers to a series of questions like “I cry easily” or “ I think the world is against me”. These questions are answered true or false and scored. Based on this assessment the counselor is able to focus on specific areas and discuss them with the client to figure out what the problem areas are. This helps with the therapeutic relationship because the results of the assessment can be discussed and the client is consistently a part of the process.

    The continued use of projective techniques is concerning because although they can be somewhat revealing in the respect that the client is talking and based on what they say this may tell the counselor something about them. But stimuli used in projective techniques don’t actually mean particular things or hold true meaning. An example of a projective technique are Rorschach “Ink Blot” tests, in which clients are shown 10 ink blots and asked to describe what they see. Unfortunately this is what some people think therapy is like and that this is a technique used often in therapy, this technique dims the true benefits of therapy and its more common and more effective practice and techniques. However, one positive thing that can be taken away from projective tests is the use of images to convey what’s going on a clients mind. Asking someone to draw what they feel or are thinking can be used for young children or people who are non verbal to help them convey the more complex feelings they don’t necessarily know how to describe.

    Reply

    • Jeremy
      Nov 04, 2021 @ 23:46:41

      Hi Pilar,
      I liked your points about rapport building with a proper assessment of personality. property assessing how your therapeutic style will need to change from client to client. Personalty can inform many aspects of a client’s presentation as well. however, It is important to note that personality has a limited effect compared to other effects such as environmental factors. It is important not to rely solely on insights from personality tests unless a conversation is had about the extent of the feelings on the tests.
      You raised a good point about the use of dating task when dealing children or nonverbal clients, there are still good clinical uses for certain projective techniques and we should be shifting our view to using more adaptive techniques .

      Reply

    • Tom Mandozzi
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 15:30:54

      Hi Pilar,

      I really liked your example and application of the MMPI-2 and how the results of this assessment might support the therapeutic process and what to focus on in terms of the counseling process. Gathering information about these multiple categories of behavior can help the clinician develop appropriate interventions for treatment while continuing to foster a positive therapeutic relationship with the client. I think knowing information about the personality of a client can help development of a personalized approach that is tailored to a client’s individual needs and presentation. Great post – it really helped me better understand the concept and importance of personality assessment!

      Reply

  19. Olgena
    Nov 04, 2021 @ 22:28:25

    According to this week lectures and recordings, it is important to remind the importance of assessments in counseling especially during the first intakes, where the clinician has not yet built a relationship with his/her client. Personality assessment are great tools to learn more about an individual essentials, requirements and other features that help a clinician to direct their focus on important matters that are needed to discuss with their client. Furthermore, personality assessment could direct the clinician on how to find the best methods to approach the client based on his/her expectations toward him/herself or others. For example, there are individuals that find it easier to express themselves filing a questionnaire rather than talking directly to their therapist. In this case, personality assessment would be helpful to the clinician to select, analyze, and develop the right techniques to create comfort and obtain credibility toward his/her client. Moreover, the personality assessment would help the clinician create beneficial therapeutic strategies and plans to help the client. Personality assessment are helpful introductory tools that help the clinician learn more information toward a client stand toward different aspect and help the client to express and show more aspects of themselves. However, as discussed in previous lectures there is always more to observe, consider, and explore, beside numerical results.

    Projective are assessments could lead to unrealistic and subjective definitions because of their lack of reliability and validity. These techniques previously based on psychoanalytic elements are considered unethical and discriminatory toward important spectrums related to an individual mental wellbeing. Good professionals, whose primary principle in mental health field must be ethical approach, would not define their decisions based on these types of assessments.

    Reply

  20. Sandra Karic
    Nov 05, 2021 @ 11:09:21

    I think the results of a personality assessment are very valuable knowledge to clinicians. Specifically, I think personality assessments can give a clinician a better idea of the client’s worldview and coping styles. This information may be useful in determining how a client will deal with stressors and may even show the clinician some maladaptive beliefs that the client holds. Furthermore, a personality assessment can give the clinician a glimpse into the client’s desires which would be helpful in supporting clients make and achieve goals. Of course, all of this information would need to come from a properly utilized and reliable assessment.

    I do not really like the idea of projective assessments. I can see how an assessment that is harder to “fake” responses to would be very useful in certain populations (I suppose mainly people who are not in treatment by choice?) but I worry about clinicians over interpreting the results. I guess I don’t have a huge issue with them being used to form hypotheses about what might be going on, but I strongly dislike the idea of using a projective assessment to make a diagnosis or come to any real conclusions. Many of the projectives have little to no reliability (or validity) so using them to make a decision that will directly impact a client sounds horrifying.

    Reply

    • Jeremy
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 15:30:02

      Hi Sandra,
      I liked your point about helping support clients’ desires. knowing some aspects of their personality can help clinicians pick how they help a client achieve goals. Matching motivational styles to appropriate interventions can help increase effectiveness and rapport.
      You point out how projective test unreliability can lead to more fake responses. This made me think about how projective assessments are particularly vulnerable to several of the populations it is meant to project .

      Reply

    • Olgena
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 18:35:55

      Hello Sandra,
      I think you did great job contrasting the difference of personality assessments and projective assessment, where is clear that a true professional would always choose assessments there are reliable and valid, to help him/her diagnose a patient. While personality assessment are helpful to focus on different aspects of a client life aspects, projective assessment lack these features and as you mentioned the word “fake” seems so proper to use, considering their discriminatory and subjective structures. I agree, when you say that using them to make a decision for a client would be horrible, and I think that would vandalize the ethical principles that a professional must have.

      Reply

    • Teresia
      Nov 06, 2021 @ 21:12:32

      Hi Sandra,

      Great post, I enjoyed reading it! You brought up a great point of how personality assessment can give information on how an individual will deal with stressors. I think this could give a clinician some thoughts on how to approach treatment but I do agree that a reliable assessment is needed. Projective techniques to me leave room for clinicians to misinterpret what the client is saying and that could lead to consequences during treatment. Going back to building rapport the client might not feel as if the clinician understands their problems.

      Reply

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Adam M. Volungis, PhD, LMHC

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