Topic 8: Appraisal of Personality {by 11/10}

Based on the text reading and lecture recording due this week consider the following two discussion points: (1) How can accurate personality assessment help the therapeutic relationship and treatment?  (2) Discuss your concerns about the continued use of projectives’ impact on clients and/or the mental health field.

 

Prepare for class: (1) NEO Five-Factor Inventory-3 (NEO-FFI-3) and (2) Anger Disorders Scale-Short (ADS:S).

 

Your original post should be posted by 11/10.  Post your two replies no later than 11/12.  *Please remember to click the “reply” button when posting a reply.  This makes it easier for the reader to follow the blog postings.

75 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Tiana Faulkner
    Nov 04, 2022 @ 11:22:31

    Because of the clarity accurate personality testing can provide in identifying client’s problems, there is sort of a domino effect into the rest of the therapy that is being administered. When a therapist is able to accurately identify a client’s problems, they are then able to administer the correct interventions, work with the client to create a treatment plan that works, and this can in turn bolster the therapeutic relationship. This accuracy gives the therapist the tools they need to provide the best care possible and give the client what it is they need to succeed.
    Projective tests are simply way too subjective. Not that all inventories are not a little subjective, but these are just too up to interpretation of the professional administering it. There is also just not enough reliable evidence for really any of the projective tests. I do not really understand why people still continue to use techniques that do not have enough research to strongly support them. There is too much that can go wrong within the interpretations, not that they are completely useless but there just seems to be more bad than good. Also, to have techniques that have some race/ethnicity biases, again not that all inventories are great at encompassing every minority but to be giving individuals assessments that have clear biases within the actual assessments seems to be unnerving. I feel like these assessments discredit the mental health field a bit, they take away a bit of the professionalism and large amounts of research that is constantly being done. It also could do serious damage to clients when not done correctly, there is too much that plays into projective tests that can cause harm to those they are administered to.

    Reply

    • Whitney Andrew
      Nov 07, 2022 @ 20:58:22

      Hi Tiana!

      I didn’t think of it as a domino effect in identifying a client’s personality, but I really like that explanation for it! I agree that it is influential over the rest of the therapeutic relationship, creating a domino effect of the client’s personality for the rest of the rapport and relationship.
      As for projective tests, I also think that there is not enough reliable evidence to support projective testing and interpretations may not always be productive. There is 100% a threat to the mental health field’s credibility due to the lack of reliability due to the tests and it poses the question of why not get rid of them if they can’t be relied on? I agree that the risk of harm is very present in using these tests and there is too much playing into it when an interpretation can severely harm a client.

      Reply

  2. Ashley Millett
    Nov 05, 2022 @ 10:57:09

    According to the book, personality assessments can be beneficial for both the client and the counselor. The counselor can benefit from the personality assessment because it shows who they are as a person. Rather than asking a nervous client on their first day, a counselor can give them an assessment. Personality assessments can show different things about the client such as stressors, desires, needs, behavioral patterns, sensitivity to certain things and much more. The counselor can then structure the sessions based on the client’s personality. Personality assessments can be considered a shortcut to identifying the client’s issues. The counselor can see why different issues were caused and how they could be caused. The counselor can also be alert about different things from the client. The counselor can be careful about possibly triggering the client. The counselor may be able to relate to the client on certain things due to looking at their personality assessment. Due to this, it can become more personal during each session. They can have a personal connection with each other. Though I can see some benefits of projective tests, I do think these are outdated. These can be traced back in the early 1900s. Projective tests are not modernized in the 21st century. There are many current assessments that can show a client’s personality. Tests that require an interpretation of something, can be a double edge sword. According to the book, projective tests have no professional consensus on how these should be interpreted. Even if the counselor explains the instructions well, there still can be a negative outcome. The counselor can interpret it the wrong way which can anger the client. The client might also get frustrated with the counselor thinking the test is a “trick question.” During sessions, it should not be stressful for both the client and counselor. There is an end goal for both. Counselors should use modern assessments that can make sessions easier rather than stressful.

    Reply

    • Tiana Faulkner
      Nov 07, 2022 @ 10:53:32

      Hi Ashley! I like how you included a variety of different ways the personality tests can help the counselor understand the client. It just goes to show how much these assessments can benefit the client when done correctly and can benefit the long-term therapeutic relationship. As for the projective tests I agree with your response. They are completely outdated and can do a lot of damage because of the lack of structure and research. There is also so much more that is not so great about these tests. Not just in how outdated it is, but also in the types of information that is being shared to the client whether intended or not. I also like how you stated that these tests can create a strain between the client and counselor. These tests can really bring up negative emotions and unneeded stress.

      Reply

    • Whitney Andrew
      Nov 07, 2022 @ 21:03:58

      Hi Ashley!

      I like how you pointed out bringing up that these assessments are a good alternative to getting to know a nervous client, I know I would feel more comfortable answering a personality assessment rather than trying to open up to a complete stranger most of the time. I would agree that they are a beneficial shortcut to identifying the root of issues for the client as personality plays into almost every issue they are dealing with.
      I would not have thought to consider the projective testing as outdated, but I kind of like that term for them. There are most definitely better tests that are more current and are more reliable in gathering a client’s personality. I agree it shouldn’t be stressful for the client and the counselor to administer an assessment so why do we even use these anymore?

      Reply

      • Tiana Faulkner
        Nov 08, 2022 @ 23:20:01

        Hi Whitney! I really like the example you used to show how personality assessments can benefit the therapeutic relationship. Having as much information as possible about the client is definitely a super important factor that impacts the success of the therapy. I also agree with your viewpoint on projective testing. There is absolutely way too much ambivalence that has the potential of causing a lot of harm. There is also not enough research to back up this type of testing and not enough structure. Like you had stated, a clinician can see a certain shape as meaning something that is simply not true. I also like how you had stated that these tests should really only be used as the beginnings of hypotheses rather than reliable measures, I did not even think of this but definitely agree. However, I also feel like there is so much harm that can be caused not only because of the ambivalence, but also because these tests are simply outdated, with damaging racial and societal undertones. There needs to either be an update in the individual tests to better represent the times or a complete decrease in their use altogether.

        Reply

  3. Becca Boucher
    Nov 07, 2022 @ 16:08:36

    Having completed an accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment because you can learn a lot about how an individual may react to life stressors and certain treatments from their results. For example, you can learn about how a client approaches difficult situations, how they perceive information, how they process or make judgements about information brought to them, and how they may respond to certain work such as expressing emotions, setting boundaries, or helping and working on themselves. Someone who scores high in openness to new experiences may be more willing to try new treatments, or reframing thoughts. However, someone high in conscientiousness may struggle with setting boundaries with others.
    Continued use of projective tests concerns me because they are so subjective. Depending on the clinician conducting the projective test and interpreting the results, you can get incredibly different interpretations. Therefore, the client is not getting sound results that they could get from an empirically tested assessment, and if their clinician is not properly trained, or just not good at their job, they could interpret some pretty crazy things from projective tests. The mental health field has been shifting into a scientific field and many researchers have worked hard to make mental health diagnosis and treatment scientific that using projective tests ignores the findings made, and brings psychology and the mental health field back to the days in which nothing was known.

    Reply

    • Magdalen Paul
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 23:01:48

      Hi Becca! I really like your point that the use of projective tests is almost a disservice to the state of the mental health field as it exists today. The growing research and evidence that has been conducted and collected to help inform clinical assessments and decisions seems entirely discarded and even irrelevant to a degree, when it pertains to projective assessments. I think this is an interesting perspective. Why should certain assessments require firm empirical evidence before being used with clients, yet projective tests seem to be the exception? I wonder if the curiosity of those in the psychology field about the human condition, combined with the deep interpretive opportunity projective tests provide, are what keep highly invalid and unreliable assessments “still on the table”….

      Reply

  4. Whitney Andrew
    Nov 07, 2022 @ 20:52:44

    Accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment in gathering a better understanding of the client and how their personality is inherently intertwined with every aspect of their life. For example, if a client’s personality is more strategic and logical, it is beneficial for the therapist to know that and be able to better incorporate set goals and plans of action for said client. Gathering information on a client’s personality also helps the therapeutic relationship to grow because they therapist is able to gather more knowledge about the client and work well with their personality and therefore continues rapport because the client feels heard.
    In terms of projective testing, there is a great amount of ambivalence, and therefore potential harm in relying on these assessments. As the textbook states, a clinician might see any triangle drawn as an indication that is simply not true. It seems as though these techniques are only passable as beginning hypotheses rather than reliable measures at all. It is nice that projective techniques have the potential to identify complex themes of personality, but the reliability of them is too low to take seriously in my opinion.

    Reply

    • Abby Sproles
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 09:55:55

      Hi Whitney, I agree with your point on the lack of reliability in projective techniques. In the Rorschach test, different therapists could have different interpretations of the client’s response. Therefore, these tests lack inter-rater reliability. Interpretations of client responses can be harmful because it may implant false beliefs about themselves. I would rather take a formal assessment that assesses my personality rather than a therapist tell me my personality based on their subjective interpretation.

      Reply

  5. mikayladebois
    Nov 08, 2022 @ 08:17:59

    Personality tests provide a wide range of data on the individual and their tendencies so it is very important for the assessments to be accurate if the clinician wants to draw any conclusion from them. In the same way that all assessments need to be accurate, personality assessments are another way for clinicians to gather information about their client so they can be properly treated. The clinician can learn the best way to present information or therapy to the client or glean a deeper understanding of how the client thinks and acts.
    Projective assessments have been demonstrated to be somewhat hurtful in the field of psychology as their results are not reliable or valid. Getting an inaccurate diagnosis in any field can be a disaster, but in the context of mental health where there is already so much stigma and shame associated with certain disorders, an inaccurate assessment can really change the way someone lives their life. I think the use of projective tests should be limited to adding information or completing the picture of a client, not being the first assessment that the diagnosis is based on.

    Reply

    • Emily Forde
      Nov 09, 2022 @ 09:52:07

      Hi Mikayla, I agree that personality assessments need to be valid and reliable, just as any other assessment does. I like the point you made about personality assessments helping rapport if utilized and interpreted correctly. Do you feel like rapport is needed before a personality assessment is utilized in order to offer some support if the interpretation is off?

      Reply

    • Chandal Powell
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 00:29:56

      Hi Mikayla,
      I agree that it is important that personality tests are accurate. As with all assessments, the therapist needs to be able to collect accurate information to effectively treat their client. It allows for more insights into the client and the way they think, communicate and process information. Ultimately, this will allow the therapist to be more effective in the way information is presented and/or received by the client. I appreciate your opinion on the potential usefulness of projective assessments. I never considered that it could be useful for adding to the overall picture of the client.

      Reply

  6. Gitte Lenaerts
    Nov 08, 2022 @ 11:18:01

    Accurate personality assessments can help improve the therapeutic relationship and treatment process if done effectively. Personality assessments help provide further clarity in identifying clients and their problems. Though there are negative traits of personality assessments, they can help with selecting interventions, aid in further treatment decisions, and build a therapeutic relationship. Personality assessments allow the clinician to look deeper within the client and assess different areas of the client other than mental health issues. Informal personality assessments are not as accurate as formal personality assessments. With informal personality assessments there provides room for random error that can affect the assessment and further treatment. We want to use formal personality assessments as they are more reliable than informal personality assessments. Additionally, they provide better insight for the client and clinician.

    There are many concerns with projective tests as they raise many red flags. Projective tests are subjective interpretations that aid in many biases. es. Furthermore, these tests are also not reliable or valid. Using these forms of tests in the mental health field may result in misunderstandings, which can turn into misdiagnoses. This will affect not only the course of treatment but the client’s overall well-being as they are not receiving the proper care. Projective testing can be extremely damaging and inaccurate due to the use of interpretations. This allows for much room for error and damaging further treatment.

    Reply

    • Emily Forde
      Nov 09, 2022 @ 09:49:00

      Hi Gitte! I really agree with how you mentioned that personality assessments can be helpful to the therapeutic relationship, if done correctly. It is vital that they are done and interpreted correctly because if not the therapist will likely make incorrect interpretations about the client and not create the best treatment plan for them. I agree with your points made about the harm in projective tests, and it makes me wonder why they are still being used. I think every client deserves to get reliable and valid assessments, especially when it comes to their mental health and overall well-being.

      Reply

    • Abby Sproles
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 10:06:17

      Hi Gitte, I resonated with your worry of the use of projective techniques for diagnosis. As Dr. V discussed in his lecture video, many projective techniques are outdated and lack generalizability to other race/ethnic groups. Therapists may be more likely to misdiagnose clients from marginalized communities when using the techniques for diagnosis. This worries me because there are already extreme discrepancies in diagnosis between racial groups, exacerbating the burden of many marginalized groups.

      Reply

    • Alysha Benoit
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 22:28:09

      Hi Gitte! I really appreciate that you mentioned how personality assessments can aid in other areas beyond mental health issues. I agree it’s important to gather an understanding of a client outside of their clinical issues. For example, if a client is presenting with issues in session, assessing their personality can help determine if there might be other things contributing to their mental health. This could also help to understand things they may not initially talk about such as other underlying problems that they themselves may not be aware of.

      Reply

  7. Emily Forde
    Nov 09, 2022 @ 09:44:49

    A client’s problems are not completely separate from their personality. Because of this, using personality assessments in therapy can help to identify problems. In addition to this, the therapist can gain a better understanding of their client through personality assessments. They can understand many aspects of the client following personality assessments, including potential stressors the client may have or how they typically behave. Overall, personality assessments help the therapeutic relationship by providing a way for the therapist to better understand the client and where they are coming from and why they behave in the way they do.
    Personality assessments can also give therapists information regarding what types of treatment interventions may be most effective for the client based off their personality.

    Projective tests are incredibly subjective and can lead to countless different interpretations. Because of the large number of different interpretations that could be made regarding results, these tests are not a reliable, or valid, way to assess a client’s problem. If results would differ based off the same picture or interpretation from therapist to therapist, it should be concluded that these tests are not an effective way to draw conclusions regarding mental health.

    Reply

    • Melissa Elder
      Nov 09, 2022 @ 12:08:03

      Emily,
      I love your first line, pointing out that clients’ problems are not completely separate from their personalities is not only so true but so important. As we have talked about in some of our courses it is possible to have been treating a client for a long span of time and then suddenly approach the helper with information that ends up connecting all the issues together, like a missing puzzle piece. The personality assessment allows the helper a head start to get to know the client at a deeper level during the very early stages of the therapy process.
      I also agree that projective tests are not an effective way to draw conclusions regarding mental health, cause as you stated the tests allow for a large number of interpretations that can only end up harming the client, helper, and therapeutic relationship.

      Reply

    • Jack Halliday
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 15:33:25

      Hey Emily, I feel like your first line is a really good summation of why personality tests are important when it comes to counseling. I totally agree that they also have a positive impact on the therapeutic relationship and just give the therapist a better understanding of many facets of the client’s life and behavior. I also agree that projectives are invalid and not reliable and cannot accurately or ethically be used to assess a client’s problem, but I wonder if that means they have no clinical utility whatsoever? I definitely don’t disagree with anything you’ve said, but I do wonder if, when used with other reliable and valid measures, they could be helpful.

      Reply

  8. Abby Sproles
    Nov 09, 2022 @ 10:27:05

    Personality assessments can provide the therapist with information regarding the client’s coping styles, needs, responses to stress, and how they interact in interpersonal relationships. This information may not be gained through other assessments or observations. Therapists can use this information to ‘match to’ the client by altering their communication style, and adapting the treatment plan to what would benefit the client the most. For example, if a client’s MMPI2 results demonstrate that they have an anxious personality, the therapist may be encouraged to incorporate relaxation techniques in session. Therapists can often assume one’s personality through observations; however, personality assessments can uncover hidden or unconscious personality traits.
    I am concerned that mental health professionals continue to use projective techniques, even when research has shown that these methods have little efficacy. I think therapists should be malleable to embracing other methods and continuously educate themselves on evidence based treatments. It is also disheartening that some counseling programs continue to teach and train these methods to future therapists. Projective techniques are completely subjective and can be harmful. The therapist’s interpretations are imposed on the client which can implant false beliefs.

    Reply

    • Melissa Elder
      Nov 09, 2022 @ 12:01:57

      Abby,
      I really liked that you pointed out that the information that is gathered from a personality assessment may not be able to be obtained from any other assessment, that is such an important point. I totally agree that this assessment can help with the helper’s ability to match the energy of their client, this is so important in regard to building a strong therapeutic relationship.
      I am also concerned that Projective testing is still being used. I agree that this practice should no longer be continued to be trained to new mental health professionals as it is not a good practice.

      Reply

    • Lucy Rising
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 08:53:18

      Hey Abby, I like your point that a personality assessment can best be used as a way to help direct therapeutic planning. These assessments can best be used not to determine and define a client’s personality, but as a way to identify certain tendencies they are inclined to, and knowing those tendencies can be beneficial to how the clinician goes about constructing their therapy plan or how they respond to the client (like you said with the matching to). Like with all assessments, we can’t use these tests to pigeonhole clients into a diagnosis or a “type” but simply use them as a tool to help further the therapeutic process in a way that would best fit the client and how they are presenting.

      Reply

  9. Melissa Elder
    Nov 09, 2022 @ 11:54:10

    Accurate personality assessments help with the therapeutic relationship and treatment process due to the assessments ability to accurately showcase who the client is as a person, the assessment helps showcase things such as stressors, preferences, behavioral patterns, their motivations, emotional make up, styles of interacting and more. When a client is given an assessment they may find it easier to answer all questions accurately rather than sitting in front of their new helper, attempting to open up to them on your first visit. The personality assessments allows the client to feel more comfortable while also being able to show the helper what kind of person they are. The information that the personality assessment gives to the helper can assist them in not only understanding the client deeper but also how to work best with their personality type and finding a good treatment path for the specific individual!
    My concerns regarding the continued use of projective assessments is that they have been shown to cause more harm within the therapy process due to the results not being valid or reliable. I do not believe using this assessment to get a diagnosis is ever a good idea as this can be detrimental to the client and the helper. The book states there is no professional consensus on how the tests should be interpreted. As stated prior the test can cause harm to the client, helper as well as the therapeutic relationship.

    Reply

    • mikayladebois
      Nov 09, 2022 @ 15:23:08

      Hi Melissa, I really like your comment about the ease of answering an assessment over talking with a new helper. I hadn’t thought about the act of answering the questions on paper as opposed to out loud. I also think that having the opportunity to think about the answer without feeling pressured to respond in a certain amount of time will lead to more accurate scores.

      Reply

    • Stephanie Lugo
      Nov 09, 2022 @ 21:38:45

      Hi Melissa,

      I agree with you that using projective tests and assessments is never a good idea because they have little to no scientific backing supporting them. Using projective assessments opens up room for so many problems to occur. When using projective assessments the clinician has total control of the interpretation. This can be a problem because there will never be consistency in the interpretation. Every single clinician’s interpretation will be different depending on what they believe the client means at that point in time. This makes the results of projective assessments extremely unreliable when it comes to obtaining any real data about the client.

      Reply

    • Taylor Poland
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 20:43:29

      Hi Melissa!
      I agree that personality assessments can be beneficial with the therapeutic relationship and treatment process. I specifically like how you touch on the idea that the client may open up a bit more during or after taking the assessment. It can be really scary to meet with a new therapist so taking an assessment may take some pressure off of the client. I agree that projective assessments are suspicious; they have more faults and inaccuracies than good or redeeming qualities so I will be sure to stay away from them. Great post!

      Reply

  10. Jack Haliday
    Nov 09, 2022 @ 12:27:35

    Accurate personality assessments can be beneficial for the therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Sometimes, personality assessments can be a shortcut towards identifying the clients’ problems, as personalities and issues are often intertwined. Also, it is likely that personality has an influence on many aspects of life that are relevant to counseling such as coping styles, interpersonal patterns, and response to stressors. Basically, I feel that personality assessments help the clinician to get a better understanding of their client which in turn makes their time with the client more beneficial. Personality is a big piece of the puzzle that makes people who they are, and as a therapist the more pieces we have to the puzzle that is our clients, the better equipped we are to give them the best help we can. When done accurately, it can also help with the therapeutic relationship because it can help make the client feel more understood and seen.
    Projectives seem to be a very polarizing thing in the field of mental health. Granted, I’ve only ever met people who are against them, but they are so vehement about their stance that I imagine it is due to the frequency that they meet people who are proponents of them. I feel like the amount of weight they carry is directly related to how much of an impact the clinician feels the subconscious has on individuals. I found it very interesting that the book said that extensive training is needed to accurately interpret the results of these assessments, then goes on to say that there is no consensus on how exactly they should be interpreted. Personally, I think that some forms of these projectives could provide interesting information, but they should not be the only source of that information. For example, you could use one of these methods, but I think it would be very important to follow up about the information you think you have gathered from it due to the general lack of validity and empirical research surrounding this form of assessment. I don’t necessarily see anything wrong with them as a tool for gathering information, but they should only be used as a precursor to more valid and accurate forms of assessment and/or information gathering. They’re almost akin to those internet tests about which Harry Potter house you would be in. You could get something from them, but without anything more they’re basically useless.

    Reply

    • Wendy Fernandes
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 11:29:52

      Hi Jack,
      I agree with the benefits you listed for accurate personality tests, and I would also add that if the therapist understands the personality of the client it can allow for thoughtful and efficient communication during treatment.
      I also agree with your thoughts on projectives being a potentially a good source of information. When used with other assessments it may add some colour to the picture, but cannot be used on its own to paint the picture.

      Reply

    • Becca Boucher
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 09:33:15

      Hi Jack! I really like that you mentioned the positives of projective personality tests. I hadn’t thought of the fact that they could be used just to gather some baseline data that you can then further explore with your client. I also like that you mentioned that even though they lack validity that it doesn’t mean they’re useless. I feel like it’s obviously important to have valid and reliable assessments, but that we often push aside methods that could be useful in a similar manner because they’re lacking validity. However, if we open ourselves up to the possibility of using things like projective personality tests and other assessment methods that lack validity as a way of gathering a baseline we could possibly provide better treatment to clients.

      Reply

  11. Esther Konadu
    Nov 09, 2022 @ 12:54:36

    An accurate personality assessment could reveal certain things about the client that might not have been addressed yet in therapy. Granted, the therapist and the client should communicate in session, but sometimes, clients can feel apprehensive about bringing up certain things. After the assessment is done, the therapist can review it and discuss the results with the client to spark a conversation. From there, the therapist can better understand how to shape treatment. For example, maybe the assessment showed that the client prefers more hands-on examples or visuals than explanations. The therapist can adapt accordingly and implement those in session and with the homework given.

    Projective assessments have essentially no evidence to suggest that they work. To give something to the client that might not work and ruin the therapeutic relationship is pointless. Projective assessments might make the client feel inferior, and that would change the structure of the therapeutic relationship into something negative. Using projectives can affect the treatment provided because a client might feel rejected or reluctant to continue. When clients feel valued and welcomed in the therapeutic space, they have better outcomes. Also, projectives remind me of the Rorschach – there is no evidence that it works, but some people are convinced that the interpretations mean something.

    Reply

    • mikayladebois
      Nov 09, 2022 @ 15:37:07

      Hi Esther, I totally agree with your thoughts on projective tests. I see no benefit to them that could not be found in some other way, so why even include the potential downfalls? I think some people would want a projective test because that will rely less on facts and more on internal opinions.

      Reply

    • Stephanie Lugo
      Nov 09, 2022 @ 18:14:35

      Hi Esther,

      You are so right about the fact that personality assessments are very beneficial for clients who are afraid to speak up and talk to their clinician. If you have a child or teenager who is mandated to attend therapy they may not want to communicate with the clinician as they may be afraid or blocked off from their emotions. This is where personality tests will be super beneficial. While the individual may not feel comfortable speaking directly to the clinician they may feel safer and more comfortable answering the questions on the assessment. If an individual does agree to take a paper assessment or personality assessment compared to speaking about their problems this can at least give the clinician basic knowledge about the client’s problems and daily struggles. This may allow the clinician to build more rapport and trust with the client and hopefully develop a therapeutic relationship that will allow for future positive therapeutic sessions.

      Reply

    • Jack Halliday
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 15:38:14

      Hey Esther, your point about personality assessments revealing previously uncovered things is a really good one that hadn’t occurred to me. Personality assessments are a way to start a conversation that might’ve previously gone un-had, which is a great point regarding their clinical utility. This conversation might also lead to insight that could strengthen the therapeutic relationship and/or better assist treatment. Your points about projectives are also very interesting, I never thought about them in the sense of making the client feel less valued or welcomed. When used incorrectly, I definitely think that there’s a higher risk that they will hinder the therapeutic process more than other types of assessments would.

      Reply

    • Becca Boucher
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 09:39:46

      Hi Ester! I really liked your point about how accurate personality assessments can reveal something about the client to the clinician that could help them form a better treatment plan for that individual. I think especially when using a personality assessment like the NEO-PI-3 seeing the openness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and extraversion scores could be helpful for a clinician. If the client they are working with scores low in openness, they may then be more prepared for some push back from the client about trying new things or doing their homework. Additionally, if someone scores really high on conscientiousness they could have perfectionistic tendencies that could be affecting their daily functioning, adding to their stress, and may need to be addressed in therapy. If someone scores extremely low on extraversion, then the clinician could not only help them overcome any social anxieties that might arise because of that, and also assign homework that don’t push the client too far out of their comfort zone if they are working on interpersonal relationships.

      Reply

    • Ashley Millett
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 10:01:27

      Hi Esther,

      I agree with what you said on personality assessments. Clients do feel apprehensive to talk about certain things to their therapist. With personality assessments, it can allow the therapist to spark up conversation with the client. The therapist can use these assessments to “break the ice” with the client if they suspect the client has more to talk about. I also agree that projective assessments are pointless. They might not work and it might make the client annoyed due to it not working. These can waste both the client’s time and also the therapist’s time.

      Reply

  12. Stephanie Lugo
    Nov 09, 2022 @ 18:05:49

    Personality assessments are extremely beneficial when it comes to developing a therapeutic relationship between a client and their clinician. Personality assessments are beneficial because it gives a more in-depth view of who the individual is. This in-depth personality assessment can allow the clinician to gain an overall picture of the client before they even have their first sit-down session. Personality tests can measure many different things, such as the client’s stressors, thoughts, desires, wants, needs, behaviors, and sensitivities. If a client can complete the personality assessment either before or during the first session it would allow the clinician time to learn about their client in depth. Using personality assessments is considered to be a type of shortcut when it comes to understanding the client they are assessing. If the clinician reviews the client’s personality assessment they can see what the client’s strengths and weaknesses are when it comes to how they will be doing in therapy. As a clinician, having personality assessments to consult will allow them to be able to guide therapy sessions easier as they will already know what motivates the individual to work harder.

    Using projective tests on clients in the mental health field can become very tricky. A projective test in psychology means that the client is presented with words, images, and situations, and the client’s responses are analyzed by the clinician. The clinician will then try and understand their unconscious expression and their personality traits. Project tests are so incredibly subjective. This means that the conduction and interpretation of these project tests are solely based on the clinician. Giving the clinician that much power can cause many issues as every clinician is very different. When you leave the interpretations of projective tests up to the clinician you never will have one cohesive assessment. The interpretation will vary from clinician to clinician which is not a good thing. In my opinion, the mental health field needs to be backed by science and research. Since projective tests are solely based on the clinician and what they think it would not be a proper type of assessment. Projective tests ignore many findings and science as a whole. This is not good because we want to go forward with our research not backwards. We currently have so many scientifically backed assessments, so using projective tests are not beneficial.

    Reply

    • Grace Ling
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 16:00:25

      Hi Stephanie,
      I agree that personality is a great way to learn more about clients though we do need to be careful in terms of solely looking at testing results. When emphasized too much, personality assessments can alter our view of clients as we are only seeing them for a limited span of time.

      I like that you point out the power differential in using projective techniques. This power differential may make it difficult for clients to stand up for themselves because it perpetuates that clients are “test subjects.”

      Reply

  13. Chandal Powell
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 00:11:39

    Accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment as this allows the therapist to better understand the client and how to interact with them. In treating a client as a whole understanding their personality can provide essential insights into how they process information. These assessments can provide the therapist with pertinent information regarding the client’s strengths, coping styles, need areas, responses to stressors, and how they function in their interpersonal relationships. Therapists can then alter how they communicate information based on the client’s personality and adjust their treatment plan to make the therapeutic process more beneficial for the client. While therapists can often assume an individual’s personality through observations, they are humans and make mistakes. These assessments can assist in confirming the therapist’s assumptions or uncovering personality traits that were not easily identified by the therapist. Once the client feels they are being heard and their voice matters, this will eventually improve or allow the therapeutic relationship to grow.
    Projective assessments have little to no evidence to suggest that they are beneficial. Therapists have complete control over how the assessment is evaluated, so there is no consistency across the mental health field, which makes it unreliable. Also, building a therapeutic relationship is so essential to a client achieving their treatment goals, so why would a therapist risk damaging that relationship by providing an assessment that is unlikely to provide useful information.

    Reply

    • Grace Ling
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 16:12:11

      Hi Chandall,
      I really like your point about personality assessment allowing for more understanding regarding coping styles and responses to stressors. Some facets of personality give some insight to clients’ lives. It is very true that we need to also evaluate our assumptions that we may place on clients given the results of an assessment. This is also extends into projective techniques and how they may fulfill confirmation bias. This is especially important if therapists are helping clients of different gender, race, and age groups.

      Reply

    • Magdalen Paul
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 23:16:41

      Hi Chandal! I really like your point that, in using projective assessments, clinicians are actually risking damage to the therapeutic relationship. Consider an individual who had an ongoing, well-established therapeutic relationship with a clinician. Imagine that the diagnosis the two had been working through together throughout sessions was informed primarily from projective test results/interpretations. This shaky foundation, although likely unbeknownst to the client, would constantly jeopardize the therapeutic relationship. If that client was to seek a second opinion, undergo another projective assessment, and receive entirely different results, that client may question everything–and for good reason! The therapeutic relationship with the first clinician would likely need some repairing…but which clinician’s interpretation should the client believe? That is the trouble. Therefore, not only do projective tests put therapeutic relationships at risk, but can also greatly mislead clients and ultimately not result in the most beneficial treatment.

      Reply

    • Alyson Langhorst
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 11:08:34

      Hi Chandal!

      I agree that understanding a client’s personality can help the therapist learn how to approach interacting with them. You also bring up a good point that personality can affect not only how a client processes information but also what they do with the information they receive. As you mentioned, coping skills can be affected by personality. Those who are thrill seekers may gravitate towards more potentially dangerous activities vs other individuals who are not. I think this also might tie into how disorders may present themselves in individuals.

      You also bring up a good point that there’s really no benefit that outweighs the negatives of projective assessments. Since they aren’t consistent and they are only up to arbitrary interpretation, it can cause both false positives and negatives. Assuming a client has something when they don’t or completely missing something that they do have can hurt the therapeutic relationship and hurt the course of treatment.

      Reply

  14. Megan VanDyke
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 07:38:51

    Accurate personality assessments can help the therapeutic relationship grow stronger and build a better treatment plan for the client. Personality assessments complement results from formal assessments to create a more well-rounded picture of the client and how they respond to the environment. Personality assessments also go beyond the mental health issues that other formal assessments report to humanize the client from a different perspective. Counselors can use personality assessments in the therapeutic relationship to hear what the client may not be saying in counseling sessions. For example, some clients may be apprehensive, nervous, or may not have had a choice in going. The initial sessions of a therapeutic relationship involve getting to know both parties and why the client may be there and can point the counselor toward the most effective treatment.
    There are several limitations to projective testing that can harm a client if not taken into consideration. Projective tests lack reliability and validity, which poses a risk of misunderstanding the data. As a result, the data may need to be more effectively communicated due to bias or how the counselor conveys the information. This can damage the client’s mental health and well-being, as misinformation can negatively affect treatment.

    Reply

    • Alyson Langhorst
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 11:30:56

      Hi Megan!

      You bring up a really good point about how personality assessments should be used as supplementation to other mental health assessments. Especially since some personality assessments, like projectives, are based on interpretations and it can be difficult to measure an individual’s personality the same way you can measure severity levels of different disorders. I agree that it can give the therapist a better understanding of the client because these assessments aren’t just looking for specific disorders, they are looking at the whole person. It’s important for counselors to get a complete picture of their client so that they can provide effective therapy. I agree that using projectives can also negatively impact the therapeutic relationship as well as negatively impact the individual. If a counselor ignores the fact that a client may be more apprehensive and nervous and talks to the client as if they should already know what their problems are, then it could cause the client to stop going to therapy.

      Reply

  15. Lucy Rising
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 10:31:14

    Personality assessments are meant to be comprehensive. MMI-II having over 500 questions, the NEO-PI-III having over 200, and the PAI having over 300 speaks to the vastness of the assessment and the variability of the questions being asked. By having this large variability it can give the clinician more insight into parts of the client’s identity that was not previously made available to them (either by withheld information on the client’s part or lack of adequate questioning on the counselor’s part). Looking at the NEO-PI can help show what sort of tendencies the client gravitates toward and that could help the counselor better conduct and direct their therapeutic process and program to fit those proclivities expressed in the assessment.
    Just as it is using any assessment, using projective assessments for diagnosis is problematic. Where these problems intensify for projectives is that they rely on the counselor’s interpretation of the client’s response as opposed to statistically normed and referenced objective tests. Projectives have low reliability and low validity which make the justification for using them low.

    Reply

    • Gitte Lenaerts
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 15:39:02

      Hi Lucy, you brought up a good point regarding how personality assessments are meant to be comprehensive. With the variety and duration of these types of assessments, they are meant to uncover our “true” personalities and give insight to clinicians. You mentioned that having this insight allows clinicians to look at the client’s identity that was not made available to them prior. Which is letting clinicians get a better understanding of the client and look deeper within. I also agree with your statement on how using any assessment, including projective assessments for diagnosis is problematic. Along with only using interpretations, there is a lack of reliability and validity as well as a weak norming group. Great post!

      Reply

  16. Wendy Fernandes
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 11:15:52

    Assessing personality happens all the time, mostly informally, when people meet each other, and it helps individuals to evaluate what type of people will eventually become partners or friends or people that they should be wary of. In the therapeutic relationship, an accurate personality assessment can be beneficial in helping the therapist find thoughtful and efficient ways of communicating with clients. For example, based on an accurate personality information the therapist will better understand whether a client likes to receive communications in a direct way or with some nuance. According to the text, knowing personality information can help the therapist understand the client’s coping style, needs and desires, how they respond to environmental stressors, relationship styles, and intrapersonal sensitivity. All this information can help the therapist with organizing how the treatment plan should be carried out.
    I like the idea of the reason for projective techniques – to focus on some of the limitations of structured assessments and by allowing the client a way to provide more information than a structured assessment. However, the limitations (low reliability, lack of normative data, little validation information) are disproportionate to the strengths. I find it embarrassing that a profession that is trying to associate itself with science would use techniques, like projectives, that to offer little to no therapeutic value.

    Reply

    • Gitte Lenaerts
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 15:21:58

      Hi Wendy, I like that you mentioned that as humans we assess personality all the time informally. You’re absolutely correct, we are always assessing personality with ourselves, peers, friends, whomever. Which is why it can be important to formally assess personality in therapeutic settings as we can “better” understand our clients. You mentioned and what the text brought up, assessing personality can be helpful in detecting environmental stressors, relationship styles, and intrapersonal sensitivity. Having this knowledge can better improve the therapeutic relationship and treatment. Additionally, I appreciate your response with projective techniques. It can be nice to have the client free associate within projective testing. In theory, this would help us also better understand the client. However, like the book, lecture, and you mentioned there are many limitations that take away the interest in projective testing. Great post!

      Reply

  17. Ariannah Zagabe
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 14:23:00

    The use of personality assessments assists in the progress of therapy and is beneficial. Personality assessments also help with assisting in detecting the client’s issues more quickly. By using an accurate personality assessment, it can aid a clinician in deciding which types of treatment approaches would be most effective for their clients. Overall, they assist the clinician in developing a better insight into the client’s personality, which can lead to an improved relationship with their client.

    Projective tests are frequently ineffective at generating reliable data and tend to lack validity. They are known for being subjective as well as unreliable. Its lack of validity and reliability can cause results to be interpreted incorrectly. In the field of mental health, this would result in more harm than good.

    Reply

    • Maria Nowak
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 11:11:29

      Hi Ariannah!

      I agree that personality assessments can have a positive effect on the therapeutic relationship and treatment for the client. The more a client is understood, the better a clinician can take the best course of action. I also agree that projective tests are ineffective. While a therapist is good at interpretations, it does not mean they are always right. The client deserves to express their own personality through conversing or self assessments.

      Reply

    • Megan VanDyke
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 11:10:38

      Hey, Ariannah! Personality assessments are a great supplement when deciding the most effective treatment plan, but they should still be used cautiously. I agree that using personality assessments as the only assessment form runs the risk of interpreting incorrect information as there is no reliability or validity. Instead, personality assessments better explain how the client thinks and behaves.

      Reply

    • Taylor Poland
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 20:38:35

      Hey Ariannah!
      I agree that personality assessments can be really beneficial in one’s treatment and the therapeutic relationship. As you said, these assessments can provide good insight into who the client is but it is important that the clinician does not base any decisions strictly on the results of the assessments. Great post!

      Reply

  18. Grace Ling
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 15:47:36

    Accurate personality assessment can provide some insight into a client’s life. In consideration of a client’s personality, we can provide interventions that may better suit their personality. Though something to consider is not relying too much on these personality assessments because as therapists we only see small sections of their lives. To foster the therapeutic relationship, it may be beneficial to understand clients’ personalities but they may present differently in different situations. We are attempting to understand them better before presenting appropriate interventions.
    Projective techniques seem to stress the role of personality to an extreme. These techniques lack reliability and validity in application, thus allowing a multitude of interpretations that may harm the client. As the term “projective” suggests, we as mental health providers cannot only rely on the client’s personality and our interpretations of their personality. These techniques have the potential to perpetuate disbelief in clients which may ruin the therapeutic relationship.

    Reply

    • Ashley Millett
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 10:11:42

      Hi Grace,

      I definitely agree that personality assessments can get an insight on the client’s life. Sometimes, the client might not want to tell us everything about them. With personality assessments, it gives a better look on how the client might react, their behavior and other components of functioning. I also agree that we should not rely much on personality assessments. Therapists and clients would need to communicate together and develop a therapeutic relationship. With a therapeutic relationship being created, we then can use the personality assessments as a reference on the client. I agree with what you have said on projective tests. They can produce more harm than good. It can also cause chaos between the client and therapist if the interpretation goes south.

      Reply

    • Lucy Rising
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 08:34:05

      Hey Grace, I like your point about how little we as clinicians of our client’s lives we will be privy to. A therapy session is such an artificial environment we will never be able to fully understand who the client is and how it is they may respond in certain circumstances. Perhaps personality assessments can shed some light on how they could possibly respond in the world, at the very least they can shed a little light on the parts of the client we might not normally get to see because we are experiencing them detached from the world and their surroundings (which would be beneficial to us in helping direct treatment style/plans)

      Reply

    • Megan VanDyke
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 12:02:30

      Hey, Grace! Using personality tests can improve the therapeutic relationship to create a better understanding of what the client is like outside of the office. However, counselors administering the assessment should ideally be used in the initial sessions. Personality assessments are not as practical as other formal assessments when choosing a treatment plan. I like your emphasis on the term “projective” to convey that test results are not set in stone. People constantly change and may respond differently to their environment as time passes. Counselors cannot rely on projective techniques as that can hinder the overall treatment and potentially damage the rapport between the counselor and client

      Reply

  19. Magdalen Paul
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 16:25:19

    Accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment because it helps the clinician better understand the client and what may be more or less effective when treating the client. An accurate personality assessment can help clarify client tendencies, to perhaps assist in identifying client problems to further examine (though a personality assessment cannot diagnose). Based on client personality assessment results, a clinician can better understand types of treatment that the client may be more receptive to. Additionally, a better understanding of the client’s personality can help open up discussion between the client and therapist, and lead to a more holistic view of the client. The more a clinician understands a client as a whole person, the more that the therapeutic relationship can likely grow.

    The use of projective tests in the mental health field brings up a few concerns, primarily around client outcomes. As these tests lack scientific evidence (and little to no reliability or validity), there is no foundation on which to analyze and interpret client responses. Further, there is great subjectivity involved in using these tests. When a client’s treatment, diagnosis, and overall wellness are at stake, using an invalid, unreliable, and highly subjective projective test to make determinations can be extremely risky. The same client could undergo the same projective test as guided and interpreted by two separate clinicians and receive entirely opposing results. Therefore, it appears best not to rely on projective tests in the clinical setting. When used alongside other techniques, some projective tests may be used as a vehicle to communicate and understand what’s going on with a client, at best.

    Reply

    • Wendy Fernandes
      Nov 10, 2022 @ 17:44:59

      Hi Magdalen,
      I like what you said about the personality test helping to open discussion between the client and therapist and gaining a holistic view of the patient. Some insight into personality may help the therapist further understand the client’s issues and may help guide treatment. I agree with your comments on projective tests possibly being a method to communicate, and I also agree with what you said about little scientific backing. I think those communications may have to be considered very cautiously before incorporating them into an analysis and treatment plan.

      Reply

    • Ariannah Zagabe
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 18:14:58

      Hi Maggie,

      I agree that the use of an accurate/reliable personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship because it helps the clinician get a better understanding of their client. In doing so, the clinician can gain some insight into the client’s personality and determine a treatment strategy that is most appropriate for the client.

      Reply

  20. Alyson Langhorst
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 16:36:43

    An accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship because it helps the counselor understand the client more. The counselor will be able to tailor how they respond to that client and may be able to provide treatment in a more effective way, such as selecting specific interventions. Accurate personality assessment can also be beneficial for building the therapeutic relationship because if the counselor understands that the client is more reserved, for example, then they can ask questions in a way to make the client feel more comfortable. Similarly, if the client had a really serious personality, then the counselor would approach therapy in a different way than if the client was more laid back. In a broad sense, understanding a client’s personality can help a counselor connect with them and help build stronger rapport.

    An accurate personality assessment can also help treatment. In some instances, part of an individual’s personality may contribute to the issues that they are facing. For example, if an individual wants to work on their social anxiety, and the counselor finds out that they are really shy, then it can help the counselor to figure out a way to approach treatment. If the counselor had another client who had social anxiety but was more outgoing, they may suggest a different approach to treatment.

    While projectives can be beneficial for understanding an individual’s personality, there are some issues with the objectivity- or lack thereof. The main concern with projectives is that they are very subjective and often based on selective recall and preexisting assumptions of the individual. What’s concerning is that observing an individual, and creating an explanation from their story/drawing, is solely based on how the counselor chooses to interpret what they see/hear. Because there’s so many different ways to interpret information, it leaves a lot of room for error. This can cause later issues for clients as it can have implications for treatment, and how the counselor approaches therapy. It can also be dangerous because a counselor could misinterpret an observation which can turn into mislabeling the individual as having some personality trait, when they really don’t have it. The book also mentions the example of a counselor who mainly works with clients who have eating disorders may be more partial to noticing behaviors in others that relate to eating habits. In this example, the counselor is more sensitive to behaviors involving eating than the other behaviors that the client is exhibiting. This can also be an issue because a counselor may overlook something important. The way that counselors interpret their observations of their clients directly impacts the client, so the concerns surrounding the accuracy and reliability of the use of projectives are something to consider.

    Reply

    • Chandal Powell
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 14:01:29

      Hi Alyson,
      I like the example you gave regarding the importance of accurate personality assessments. It highlights the importance of meeting clients where they are for them to feel heard and seen. This will ultimately help to improve the therapeutic relationship. I also liked how you pointed out that a part of someone’s personality could contribute to their issues. This would be important to identify as it will impact how receptive the client is to treatment and how the clinician will tailor treatment for that specific client.

      Reply

  21. Vic White
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 17:36:42

    Personality assessment can help the counselling process because it can provide shortcuts to identifying what the client is struggling with and the problems they are having. Our personality also contributes to many aspects of our lives, such as, our needs and desires, coping styles and our responses to environmental stressors. It is beneficial for the client’s treatment because it helps us select specific tools and interventions that will work best for the client and have the most positive effects. The client’s personality should also be considered when making treatment decisions because what may work best for one personality type, may not work well for others.
    Projective techniques have a good underpinning, however, the way they are scored and the results they provide are very subjective. They address things that cannot be addressed by standardised instruments, however, because of how subjective they are, the reliability of the techniques is questionable and leads to the question of if they really work and give us a deeper understanding of a individuals unconscious and their personality traits. I personally think that the idea of projective techniques, is better than how they actually are used and interpretated.

    Reply

    • Maria Nowak
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 10:47:39

      Hi Vic!
      I also described how treatments may work for certain personalities and may not work for others. This is significant because it will give the clinician insight on how to guide and treat the client. It also helps build the therapeutic relationship because there is a better understanding of the client. I would also agree that projective techniques are very subjective and do not necessarily give an accurate evaluation of an individual.

      Reply

  22. rena yaghmour
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 18:22:03

    Personality assessments can help clinicians come up with treatment that is a good fit for the client based on their personality assessment score. The clinician would be able to tell what kind of personality the individual has and work with them based on that. The clinician will also be able to come up with good coping styles that fit the individual’s personality as well as educate them on what kind of environment and needs they may particularly benefit from. With an accurate personality assessment, the clinician is also able to select specific interventions for them.
    Some concerns around the of projective’s is mainly the fact that it’s inaccurate most of the time. It will present an individual with a certain diagnosis though it is most likely incorrect making them unreliable and invalid approach to assess a client. it is also subjective which adds to the fact that it’s not entirely beneficial.

    Reply

    • Ariannah Zagabe
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 18:16:11

      Hi Rena,

      I agree that projective tests are inaccurate majority of the time. It is challenging to assess how accurate the results are because they lack both reliability and validity. It may result in a misdiagnosis, which can be very detrimental to the client.

      Reply

    • Vic White
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 23:00:23

      Hi Rena,
      I like how you mentioned about finding good coping strategies for the client based on their personality. And the mention of the environment, that is something I hadn’t considered. I agree with projectives being unrealistic and unreliable, this is a really good point and being subjective doesn’t add anything good or beneficial to the use of them.

      Reply

  23. Maria Nowak
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 18:23:40

    An accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment by providing insight in identifying a clients problems, help select interventions, assist in treatment decisions, and contribute to the structure of the counseling relationship. Each individual has a different personality. What interventions and treatments that work for certain individuals may not work for other individuals. Understanding a person’s personality will give the clinician insight on how to best guide and treat the client. If the therapist is setting up a treatment plan with aspects that will clash with the clients personality, it will create a poor therapeutic relationship.
    Concerns about the continued use of projectives impact on clients/or in the mental health field is that it is not necessarily an accurate way to evaluate personality. Projectives are obtained through stimuli and interpretations. While a clinician in the mental health field would likely produce more accurate interpretations, it does not give the client a fair chance to express their thoughts. It would not give data on information directly through the client.

    Reply

    • Esther Konadu
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 14:24:47

      Hi Maria,

      You are absolutely right – the therapist needs to meet the client’s needs & use the personality assessment to organize the treatment plan properly. Compounding the trust of the therapeutic relationship into a treatment plan that the client would make for themselves, makes a client that much more open to trying. And projective assessments are so subjective it could mean literally anything and still not be the right thing.

      Reply

    • rena yaghmour
      Nov 15, 2022 @ 00:12:24

      Hi Maria,
      I definitely agree with you! I like your point on how each individual treatments may be different from one another especially because certain approaches don’t work for everyone. I think it is very important that a clinician gets to know their client and get a better understanding of their personality so the work is effective and done in a way that best fits the client. treatment for the client should be best tailored to not only fit what they express to work best for them but their personality as well. A clinician can’t joke around a lot with their client if their personality is more on the serious side. The client would be frustrated with that approach and there would not be a good therapeutic relationship.

      Reply

  24. Taylor Poland
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 18:36:41

    Accurate results of personality assessments are crucial for the therapeutic relationship and treatment. In order to draw conclusions from personality assessments, the assessments need to be as valid and reliable as possible. The results from the assessments can be used to gain further insight into the individual, such as their coping styles, needs and desires, responses to stressors, relationship patterns, and interpersonal relationships. From this information collected, the counselor can implement various treatment strategies that may work best for the client. Projective techniques entail the client describing or responding to unstructured stimuli. Projective techniques are thought to be an effective method for uncovering hidden or unconscious aspects of one’s personality. However, mental health counselors can be biased when interpreting their observations. The inaccurate interpretations can lead to embarrassment or shame surrounding their personality/diagnosis/treatments. As a future clinician, I need to be aware of my own beliefs to avoid pushing them onto others.

    Reply

    • Alysha Benoit
      Nov 12, 2022 @ 22:31:55

      Hi Taylor, I really liked how you were specific in your description of how personality assessments can be beneficial to a client. I agree that it is super important to use assessments in ways that not only get a better understanding of the client but also provide a deeper context in treatment planning. Assessments like these also support the fact that every client is different, with different coping styles, and differing needs from their counselor.

      Reply

    • rena yaghmour
      Nov 15, 2022 @ 00:18:38

      Hi Taylor,
      I agree that accurate results are important for therapeutic relationships and treatments. I would definitely hate finding out that my clinician gave me a wrong diagnosis and has been providing me with the wrong treatment. I also think getting a deeper look into the clients personality is important for treatment because it helps the clinician come up with skills the client may be more receptive to and ways to incorporate them into their life and treatment. Each personality is different and so is each way of dealing with certain situations which is also important to note that not every treatment is going to be the same

      Reply

  25. Alysha Benoit
    Nov 10, 2022 @ 23:08:14

    Accurate personality assessment can help the therapeutic relationship and treatment through various ways. Personality assessments help both the client and the counselor in establishing a better understanding of the type of treatment intervention needed to help the client. Furthermore, accurate personality assessments help establish rapport by allowing the client to understand more about themselves and the motive in providing assessments. Beyond the influence personality assessments have on helping to identify client issues, it also can help to determine how one’s personality may be affecting their everyday lives.

    The continued use of projectives may have a harmful impact on the way counselors view and treat their clients. To this point, projectives have little to no scientific benefits or validation to them. There is danger in comparing clients to those of the norming group in that several, significant factors may impede these differences. Not only could there be significant differences between comparative groups such as demographic backgrounds, but the use of projectives are subjective as well. The subjectivity in using projectives can be harmful to client progress in that varying answers to assessments, such as inkblot assessments, take up time that could be used assessing individuals with instruments that have stronger validity and reliability

    Reply

    • Esther Konadu
      Nov 11, 2022 @ 15:12:19

      Hi Alysha,

      I agree, it is surprising to hear that some therapists are using these subjective assessments when there are several better options out there. It also speaks to how some therapists and other professionals in the field feel like they can continue to do what they feel is right and disregard their clients’ feelings and thoughts.

      Reply

  26. Vic White
    Nov 12, 2022 @ 23:14:36

    Hi Alysha,
    Good point about establishing rapport with the client, I guess doing any type of assessment could help build rapport and I hadn’t thought about that until reading your post. I really liked your comment about projectives being harmful to a client progress, I think it would be hard to track an individuals progress too if there was repeated use of projectives without assessments, etc. to help track progress.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Adam M. Volungis, PhD, LMHC

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 88 other followers
%d bloggers like this: